Events

Upcoming events within the Ignatian Center.

"Economy and Security in the 21st Century" with Madeleine Albright
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    How can America retain its leadership role amidst rapid globalization? Is America truly the indispensable nation? How do domestic politics influence foreign policy?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
"What Makes a Champion?" with Ronnie Lott
  • Thursday, Oct 9, 2014 at 7:30 AM

    What makes an athlete courageous? Staying in the game at all costs or sitting out when physical safety is at risk? What would one of the fiercest tacklers in the NFL say?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
#TWEET: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     Contemporary music technology, 16th century madrigals, and everything in between. The songs of birds serve as a starting place for an evening full of innovation from one of the original sources of musical inspiration. Combined with live audience feedback and interactive compositions, it’s a night where you'll want to make sure your smartphone is anything but off.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
11th Annual Bronco Legacy BBQ
  • Friday, Sep 19, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

    The Bronco Legacy BBQ is for incoming legacy students and their families and takes place on the Friday evening of Welcome Weekend. Legacy students are those whose parents, grandparents, or siblings also attended Santa Clara. The barbecue give the Alumni Association a chance to recognize their unique connection to our Santa Clara family and is a great way for them to meet other students with strong SCU ties.

    Friday, September 19
    5:30pm - 7:00pm
    Mission Gardens
    $20 per person (including the incoming student)
    Children 12 and under are free
    Prices include BBQ dinner and beverages

    RSVP ONLINE


     

     


    Cost: $20
    Location: Mission Gardens
5K Bronco Fun Run/Walk
A Bold New Vision: SCU in 2020
  • Friday, Oct 10, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

    Featuring Dennis Jacobs, University Provost

    Join the Provost for a presentation and discussion about Santa Clara 2020, the University's new strategic plan that promises to transform the Santa Clara student experience, and elevate the University's position among the nation's premier institutions. Come hear what the University's plans are for enrollment and facilities that honor our historical mission while building upon our core strengths and opportunities.

    Event includes lunch & beverages.

    Visit the Grand Reunion Schedule and RSVP today >>


    Cost: $25
    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Advent Celebration
Advent Reconciliation
African American New Student Welcome Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2018!

    This reception is for all incoming freshmen and transfer students with African American ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as to learn about different ways to get involved with the African American community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP Coming Soon


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Arts & Sciences Building
         SCU Campus
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
Alumni Association Board of Directors Meeting
ALUMNI Travel to England
  • Sunday, Aug 31, 2014 at 8:00 AM to Friday, Sep 12, 2014 at 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    Then & Now: SCU in England – London, York & Durham

    Celebrate 50 years of Study Abroad at SCU with the Alumni Association in the summer of 2014.

    - See more at: http://www.scu.edu/alumni/learn-travel/TravelAbroad.cfm#sthash.b6Ii4rab.dpuf

    SCU in England - London, York and Durhm

    Celebrate 50 years of Study Abroad at SCU with the Alumni Association.  Join History Professor Emeritus, Tim O'Keefe and Political Science Chair, Dennis Gordon on this unique Bronco excursion to England. 

    RSVP

    SThen & Now: SCU in England – London, York & Durham

    Celebrate 50 years of Study Abroad at SCU with the Alumni Association in the summer of 2014.

    - See more at: http://www.scu.edu/alumni/learn-travel/TravelAbroad.cfm#sthash.b6Ii4rab.dpuf

     


    Cost: TBD
An Evening with Andy Ackerman
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Hear Andy Ackerman ’78 in conversation about directing and producing some of TV’s funniest and most beloved series, including Seinfeld, The New Adventures of Old Christine, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
Ash Wednesday Tri-School Liturgy
Asian Pacific Islander New Student Welcome Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2018!

    This reception is for all incoming freshmen and transfer students with Asian/Pacific Islander ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as to learn about different ways to get involved with the API community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP Coming Soon


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Kennedy Mall, Commons at Kennedy Mall
         SCU Campus
Bannan Institute: Encounter, Engage, Create: Moral Imagination and Ignatian Leadership
Behind the Scenes: Santa Clara Chorale's
  • Thursday, Dec 11, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.
    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

     

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weiris the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Dec 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.
    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

     

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weiris the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Bergin Society Brunch
Boston AFO- Volunteer at Greater Boston Food Bank
Brazil for Beginners: an Introduction to the History, Politics and People That Made Modern Day Brazil
  • Tuesday, Sep 23, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Sep 30, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 7, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Bronco Arts Showcase
Broncos Go Social: Levi's Stadium Tour
  • Thursday, Sep 18, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM

    Join the SCU Alumni Association and fellow Broncos for a behind-the-scenes tour of Levi's Stadium. Tour includes access to locker rooms, club and suite levels, and more!. Spots on the tour are very limited, so sign up early!

    Who is a young alum? We define "young alumni" as those who graduated between 2005-2014 and are 35 years old or younger. As always, we welcome alumni from all classes to enjoy our "young alumni" events.

    RSVP TODAY!


    Cost: $25
    Location:
         Levi's Stadium
Broncos Meeting Broncos
Bruno Ruviaro - Electronic Music
Building a Culture of Excellence with Maj. General Tooliatos
  • Friday, Oct 10, 2014 from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM

    HOOAH: Building a Culture of Excellence

    Maj. Gen. Nick Tooliatos, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), will offer the best practices for creating and sustaining a culture of excellence in the workplace. In order to enhance performance culture, a successful organization needs an ever-evolving ethos that shapes and develops leaders. TRADOC fundamentally transformed the Army into the best trained, equipped, led and organized modern land power in the world. As a senior leader in the Army Reserve, Maj. Gen. Tooliatos will discuss key lessons from the military's leadership culture and how he created a culture of excellence in his civilian job as a partner at Pleasanton's law firm, Randick O'Dea & Tooliatos, LLP.


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         TBD
Building Self Esteem Through Sports from the Jerry Smith Coaching for Life Academy
  • Thursday, Oct 9, 2014 from 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM



    Please join us for a 
    workshop featuring an esteemed surprise guest speaker. There will be an overview of the Jerry Smith Coaching for Life Academy. We will provide insight into our goals and objectives, including the use of sports as a vehicle to build self-esteem, develop leadership, create good healthy habits, improve teamwork, and enhance communication. We welcome faculty, students, staff, alumni, and members of the community to attend.

    Click Here to RSVP
     


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Locatelli Center
Campus Tour
Campus Tour
Central Coast 41st Annual Dinner
Chicago Summer Send Off Reception
  • Monday, Sep 8, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

     

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Henrik, Annemette and Frederik '17 Clausen.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.  

    Reception ~ Casual Attire
    RSVP by emailing Frankie Bastone in the Alumni Office at FBastone@scu.edu


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         The Clausen Residence
Chicano Latino Chapter: Mexico vs. Chile Soccer Match
  • Saturday, Sep 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     Join the Alumni Association and the Chicano Latino Alumni Chapter for an exhilarating soccer match featuring Mexico and Chile. Guests will enjoy lower bowl seats that around surronded by fellow Broncos.

    RSVP ONLINE



     


    Cost: $45.00
    Location:
         Levi's Stadium
Chicano Latino New Student Welcome Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2018!

    This reception is for all incoming freshmen and transfer students with Chicano Latino ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as to learn about different ways to get involved with the Chicano Latino community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP Coming Soon


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
         SCU Campus
Christmas Eve Liturgy (5 pm)
Christmas Eve Liturgy (9 pm)
Class of 1949 Reunion Lunch
Class of 1954 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1959 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1964 Golden Anniversary Dinner
Class of 1964 Kickoff Dinner
Class of 1969 BBQ
Class of 1969 Reunion Party
Class of 1969 Women's Reception
Class of 1974 After Party
Class of 1974 Campo di Bocce Evening
Class of 1974 Reunion Party
Class of 1979 Reunion Party
Class of 1984 Reunion Party
Class of 1989 Reunion Party
Class of 1994 Reunion Party
Class of 1999 Reunion Party
Class of 2004 Reunion Party
Class of 2009 Reunion Party
Climate Change in the 21st Century
  • Wednesday, Oct 8, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Note: This is a shorter version of the on-campus class with the same title.

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

     

    Instructor:
    David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

    Shoort Course, Other Dates: October 8, 15

    Location: The Villages at the Vineyard Center


     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Oct 15, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Note: This is a shorter version of the on-campus class with the same title.

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

     

    Instructor:
    David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

    Shoort Course, Other Dates: October 8, 15

    Location: The Villages at the Vineyard Center


     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Climate Change in the 21st Century
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Nov 3, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Dec 1, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
College of Arts & Sciences Reception
Combined Choral Concert
Commencement Recital
Coz Cup Rugby Game
CPSY x245: Addiction for Psychotherapists
  • Friday, Oct 10, 2014 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, Oct 11, 2014 at 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CPSY x245: Addiction for Psychotherapists

    DATE: Friday, October 10 & Saturday, October 11 *Must register by October 1

    TIME: 8-5PM each day (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 134

    WORKSHOP FEE: $384

     

     

     

    *This course meets the 15 hr substance abuse requirement for SCU CPSY grad students in the 78 unit program. The course will appear on your transcript with a Pass or No Pass.

    This course meets the qualifications for 15 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION 

    In this course, the concept of addiction as disease is explored on many levels. An understanding of the neurochemistry and actual changes in the brains of those who have become addicted is crucial, as well as contributing genetic and environmental factors. Activities from the Betty Ford Center Childrens Program will provide useful metaphors for the addiction and recovery process. These activities are useful in-group and individual therapy with adolescents and adults as well as children. Chronic and shame are factors in addiction, and this workshop will consider theories on the development of shame and defenses against shame, including addictions. How therapists can incorporate 12-step recovery into their work with addicts, and alternatives to 12-step programs will be presented as well. Consideration is given to Jungian and Self Psychological theories as they relate to addiction, and the role of spirituality in addiction recovery. The second day will focus on the effects of addiction on the family, and the developmental stags of the disease process as it affects both addict and the family and the stages of recovery as well. The course will incorporate lecture, video, music, some reflection and writing, small group discussion, and activities.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Acquire a solid understanding of the neurochemistry & brain changes that occur in addiction
    • Have experienced activities providing useful metaphors for understanding the addiction & recovery process that can be used with clients individually or in groups
    • Appreciate the profound role of stress in the development of addiction and its role in craving and relapse
    • Recognize the role of shame and its relation to addiction
    • Incorporating 12-step recovery in the therapy process
    • Consider the role of spirituality in recovery and both Jungian and Self-Psychological theories related to addiction
    • Understand the roles family members take in addicted families
    • Acquire knowledge of the developmental stages families experience in their own recovery 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: MFT's, LCSW's, Psychologists, SCU CPSY grad students in 78 unit program, and Addiction Counselors.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Wendy Wade has been involved with children and parents throughout her career, beginning with her work with children of addicted parents in 1979, through elementary school teaching and administration. She worked at Betty Ford Center as Coordinator of their unique program for children of addicted parents, and has provided many trainings and conference presentations, both locally and nationally, on the disease of addiction and working with children of addicted parents. She has combined her experience in education with her psychotherapy training to work for Santa Cruz Country Children’s Mental Health. She has three articles published in professional journals, and is beginning work on a book on the experience of a person’s Catholicism in drug and alcohol recovery. Her education includes a BA in psychology from Stanford University, a Master’s Degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Santa Clara University, a teaching credential from San Jose State University, an Educational Administration credential from Santa Clara University, and a PhD from Pacifica Graduate Institute. She has an LPCC license and is certified as a CADC 1 counselor.


    Cost: $384
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 134
CPSY x262: You Are the Caring Presence
  • Saturday, Oct 18, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x262 - You Are the Caring Presence

    DATE: Saturday, Oct. 18 *Must register by October 8 

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This workshop will give participants a working understanding of post-traumatic stress and cumulative stress reactions as the natural response to loss, illness, change, trauma, or death. Effective techniques for recognition and intervention will be practiced, and specific tools for healing and transforming the traumatic event will be explored. Participants will also examine the specific issues related to response/caregiving professionals and their unique delayed response to trauma.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Explain the differences between the feelings, behaviors, and symptoms associated with post trauma stress and grief.
    • Describe the grief process and its components.
    • Discuss tools that accurately determine acute and delayed stress response and select techniques for intervention.
    • Utilize critical incident stress model for immediate and intermediate response.
    • Explain one's own emotional awareness.
    • Describe communication skills that are requisite in supporting individuals and groups. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Nurses, Physicians, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students and Others.

    LEVEL: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Janet Childs is Director of Education Centre for Living with Dying through the Bill Wilson Center and is the director of the Bay Area CISM Team. She has Over 35 years experience in counseling, crisis intervention, volunteer management and training development. She has worked at Project Headstart, Community of Communities, Valley Rape Crisis Center, Suicide and Crisis Service, Alum Rock Counseling Center, Santa Clara University, San Jose City College, San Jose State University, and many other institutions of higher learning. Ms. Childs has been a keynote speaker at trauma and loss conferences around the world, is recipient of the Santa Clara County Medical Association Citizens Award, the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children Father Ken Czillinger Professional Award, the COMA (Communications Operations Managers Association), Susan Voellger Award for Training, San Jose Fire Department: Class A: Civilian Devoted Service, Oakland Fire Outstanding Performance, City of San Jose Commendation, as well as numerous other recognitions and honors.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x274: Gottman's Couple Therapy (Level 1)
  • Friday, Nov 14, 2014 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Nov 15, 2014 at 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x274: Gottman's Couple Therapy (Level 1) 

    DATE: Friday, November 14 & Saturday, November 15 *Must register by November 5

    TIME: 9-4:30PM each day (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $360

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION 

    In this inspirational two-day workshop, you'll learn: 

    How to help understand couples' struggles using new research-based assessments and effective interventions 
    Research-based strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict 
    Skills that empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues by uncovering their underlying dreams, history, and values 
    Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts 
    Techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse 

    You’ll receive a 300-page Clinical Manual featuring new relationship assessment questionnaires and clinical interventions that you’ll be able to use immediately with your clients. 

    Clinicians who take this workshop will be equipped with new methods and tools to help couples break the cycle of criticism, defensiveness, contempt and stonewalling. Through demonstrations and films from the clinical office, you'll see how to apply the research-based principles and interventions of Gottman Method Couples Therapy to strengthen:
    The Friendship System - the building block for intimacy, passion, and good sex. 
    The Conflict System - the basis for helping couples manage solvable problems and understand and manage irresolvable differences. 
    The Shared Meaning System - the existential foundation of the relationship that helps couples create shared purpose in building a life together. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Summarize the research on prediction of future relationship stability.
    • Describe the seven levels of the Sound Relationship House theory.
    • Conduct a couple's therapy assessment using elements of the couple's narrative, the Oral History Interview, written questionnaires, observations of conflict, and individual interviews.
    • Describe two interventions to help strengthen a couple's management of conflict.
    • Describe two interventions to enhance a couple's friendship system. 
    • Describe two interventions to explore a couple's system of shared meaning.  

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Mental health providers, allied professionals and clergy, students & interns, family clinic staff, professors/teachers of couples therapy, researchers in the social sciences, and employee assistance professionals. 

    LEVEL: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    As a trained and Certified Gottman Method Therapist, Robert Navarra integrates research-based approaches in helping couples grow closer, manages differences, and creates opportunities for shared meaning and connection. Working as a relationship coach, I provide couples tools to deepen their friendship and effectively deal with conflict, especially with the “stuck issues”.


    Cost: $360
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy

    DATE: Saturday, December 6 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This course will present Aperture as the powerful central focus for couples therapy. In it we will discuss the neurological concomitants of this openness, what we know about the conditions that result in opening or closing, interventions for maximal effectiveness in opening apertures, use of the evaluation and early sessions in relation to ApertureTM, maximizing early progress, and the relationship between ApertureTM as a focus and the various models for couples therapy.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:
    • Explain the relevance of a focus on Aperture for couples therapy.
    • Describe the possible neurological correlates of Aperture.
    • Discuss how to use Aperture awareness to guide their interventions.
    • Perform interventions for opening Aperture through: eye contact, pacing, balance, internal self-management, reassurance, and inquiry.
    • Describe the relationship between Aperture focus and treatment models.
    • Discuss methods for maximizing early change.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: This course is appropriate for clinical practitioners working with individual, couples or families and for graduate students working toward degrees leading to the practice of psychotherapy including individual, couples and family therapies.

    Level: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO
    Kathryn Ford, M.D. has been working with couples for 20 years and has a private practice in Menlo Park. She has developed Learning Partners, an approach to helping couples see their difficulties as part of their development and to bring their creative strengths into the relationship. She has taught and supervised at Stanford University School of Medicine and at local graduate schools of psychology, including The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology and Santa Clara University. She received her M.D. from Brown Medical School and completed her training in psychiatry at Stanford.
     
    In addition to teaching and her clinical practice, Dr. Ford offers individuals a group consultation to therapists and workshops for both couples and therapists. 

     


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x284: Being a More Effective Therapist: Understanding What Clients Bring to the Table
  • Saturday, Oct 25, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CPSY x284: Being a More Effective Therapist: Understanding What Clients Bring to the Table

    DATE: Saturday, October 25 *Must register by October 15

    TIME: 9 AM-12 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    Workshop Fee: $72

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Course Description: 

    This course will review the research on how clients act as active self-healers in psychotherapy. It will also consider the implications of these findings for practice and make a number of suggestions for better improving the quality of your clients' participation in therapy. The recent development of "feedback-informed therapy" will be discussed in this context. Brief exercises will be used to bring the material alive. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe two relevant research findings that illustrate the role of client agency in psychotherapy.
    • List the factors involved in promoting client engagement in psychotherapy & cite two relevant research findings.
    • Describe 3 client characteristics that can interfere with productive involvement in psychotherapy & discuss ways of dealing with them.
    • Explain what effective collaboration & empathy really mean & how they operate in psychotherapy.
    • Describe ways clients are creative in psychotherapy and approaches to facilitating creativity. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Anyone who does psychotherapy or counseling, such as clinical psychologists, marriage & family therapists, licensed professional counselors, addiction counselors, social workers, psychiatrists, or psychiatric nurses.

    Level: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO  

    Arthur C. Bohart, PhD, is professor emeritus at California State University Dominguez Hills. His work has focused on empathy in psychotherapy, on the role of the client as active self-healer in psychotherapy, and on the role of experiencing in psychotherapy. Dr. Bohart's books include Empathy Reconsidered: New Directions in Psychotherapy (with Leslie S. Greenberg, 1997) and How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process of Active Self-Healing (with Karen Tallman). His latest book, co-edited with Barbara S. Held, Edward Mendelowitz, and Kirk J. Schneider, was published by the American Psychological Association (2012), entitled Humanity's Dark Side: Evil, Destructive Experience, and Psychotherapy.


    Cost: $72
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x320: Understanding and Working with Children from Addicted Families
  • Saturday, Nov 15, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x320 - Understanding and Working with Children from Addicted Families 

    DATE: Saturday, November 15 *Must register by November 5

    TIME: 9-4:30PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 134

    WORKSHOP FEE: $180

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 4.75 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Boards of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    In this course, psychotherapists will come to understand the experience of growing up in a home with one or more addicted parents. The presenters experience as Coordinator of the Betty Ford Center Childrens Program provides understanding & resources to share in this training. Childrens artwork will assist in illustrating the feelings experienced by children in homes with active addiction, as well as the conflicting feelings that come with parents recovery. The children make some family dynamics evident as well. Understanding the neuroscience of the disease of addiction, recovery, and relapse is crucial to working with children. Throughout the days activities will assist in illustrating the concepts presented, and copies of many activities appropriate for individual, family, and group therapy will be provided along with bibliographies of books appropriate for children, parents, and therapists.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

     

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Discuss addictive family dynamics and the effects on children.
    • Describe the roles children often take in their families and select tools to help them understand the importance of their defenses, and how to safely choose when they are helpful or not.
    • Explain the disease concept of addiction, and approaches to simplifying for children.
    • List specific kinds of support to offer children from addicted families.
    • Discuss individual resiliency factors & environmental protective factors.
    • Critique several activities that can be used in individual, family, & group therapy situations.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: MFT's, LCSW's, LPCC's, Psychologists, and Addiction Counselors.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Wendy Wade has been involved with children and parents throughout her career, beginning with her work with children of addicted parents in 1979, through elementary school teaching and administration. She worked at Betty Ford Center as Coordinator of their unique program for children of addicted parents, and has provided many trainings and conference presentations, both locally and nationally, on the disease of addiction and working with children of addicted parents. She has combined her experience in education with her psychotherapy training to work for Santa Cruz Country Children’s Mental Health. She has three articles published in professional journals, and is beginning work on a book on the experience of a person’s Catholicism in drug and alcohol recovery. Her education includes a BA in psychology from Stanford University, a Master’s Degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Santa Clara University, a teaching credential from San Jose State University, an Educational Administration credential from Santa Clara University, and a PhD from Pacifica Graduate Institute. She has an LPCC license and is certified as a CADC 1 counselor.


    Cost: $180
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 134
CPSY x644: Spousal/Partner Abuse - Assessment, Detection, and Intervention Strategies
  • Friday, Oct 10, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CPSY x644 - Spousal/Partner Abuse - Assessment, Detection, and Intervenion Strategies

    DATE: Friday, October 10 *Must register by October 1

    TIME: 9-5 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    Workshop Fee: $192

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 7 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The course presents an overview of the dynamics and impact of spousal/partner abuse—intimate partner violence (IPV)—on victims/survivors and children.
     
    The impact of abuse is presented with the following topics in mind:
    • A historical and “trauma informed” context
    • Detection as well as differential and danger assessment
    • Perpetrator dynamics and types
    • Cultural factors and same gender abuse dynamics
    • Intervention, safety planning, and treatment strategies
    • Legal system resources and response including how to apply for a protective order
    • Relevant community resources

    Learning Objectives

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe key dynamics of Battering/Intimate Terrorism/Coercive Control including the core dynamic of the abuse of power and control within a historical context.
    • Discuss Intimate Partner Violence (IPV).
    • Describe the key dynamics of dating violence.
    • Compare tools for detection and the differential assessment of IPV including lethality factors.
    • Discuss the potential impact of IPV victimization on the victim and on children exposed to IPV including, potential traumatic impact, PTSD, "Complex Trauma" and some neurobiological correlates.
    • List key perpetrator characteristics and categories.
    • Discuss unique cultural factors and same gender abuse considerations as they apply to all of the above.
    • Discuss "exposure" to IPV as an "Adverse Childhood Event" and potential risks.
    • Design intervention strategies. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Mental health providers, allied professionals and clergy, students & interns, family clinic staff, professors/teachers of couples therapy, researchers in the social sciences, and employee assistance professionals.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Steve Baron, M.A., MFT, is the retired director of Family Court Services in Santa Clara County, California, former adjunct faculty for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on the subject of juvenile dependency mediation, retired from 25 years of private practice, an occasional trainer for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Superior Court in Santa Clara County, and various community agencies on subjects including domestic violence, the impact of trauma on child development and victims of domestic violence, trauma-informed systems, mediation and custody evaluation, and ethics, and has been the recipient of awards from Legal Advocates for Children and Youth for services to families and children, “The Judge Len Edwards Champion of Peace Award” from the Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council, and the Santa Clara County Psychological Association for the training of mental health professionals in the areas of divorce, child custody, and domestic violence.  He has been a lecturer for Santa Clara University in the graduate Counseling Psychology division for the past 27 years on subjects including child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse, and trauma. He has authored or co-authored articles for the Family Court Review, California’s Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, and the Juvenile and Family Court Journal.


    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x647: Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CPSY x647– Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting

    DATE: Friday, December 5 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-5PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $192

     

     

     

    Course meets the qualifications for 7 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The course will meet all of the requirements of California Business and Professions Code Section 28. Training will be provided in child abuse assessment and reporting including detailed knowledge of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act and the assessment and method of reporting of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporal punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
     
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES
    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:
    • Discuss mandatory child abuse law requirements, rights, responsibilities, and methods of reporting.
    • Recite law definitions of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporate punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
    • Predict consequences of failure to report, and assess how to provide for a child's need after a report is made.
    • Discuss assessment considerations.
    • Discuss basic crisis counseling considerations and techniques.
    • Explain the impact of abuse and neglect on children and adults.
    • Predict traumatic impact of abuse and neglect and related implications for treatment, and evidence based forms of treatment for children and adults.
     

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Marriage & Family Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students and Undergraduate Students. 

    LEVEL: Intermediate

     INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Steve Baron, M.A., MFT, is the retired director of Family Court Services in Santa Clara County, California, former adjunct faculty for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on the subject of juvenile dependency mediation, retired from 25 years of private practice, an occasional trainer for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Superior Court in Santa Clara County, and various community agencies on subjects including domestic violence, the impact of trauma on child development and victims of domestic violence, trauma-informed systems, mediation and custody evaluation, and ethics, and has been the recipient of awards from Legal Advocates for Children and Youth for services to families and children, “The Judge Len Edwards Champion of Peace Award” from the Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council, and the Santa Clara County Psychological Association for the training of mental health professionals in the areas of divorce, child custody, and domestic violence.  He has been a lecturer for Santa Clara University in the graduate Counseling Psychology division for the past 27 years on subjects including child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse, and trauma. He has authored or co-authored articles for the Family Court Review, California’s Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, and the Juvenile and Family Court Journal.

     


    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Nov 22, 2014 at 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy

    DATE: Friday, November 21 &  Saturday, November 22 *Must register by November 12

    TIME: 9-3PM each day (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $288

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 9.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Systemic and intrapsychic perspectives are provided as organizing frameworks for treating sexual desire discrepancy, with special attention to understanding the meaning underneath details of sexual behavior. The course emphasizes using sexual difficulties for psychological and emotional development. The course includes practical application (via case studies, role plays, and skill building exercises) for better learning, understanding and integration of this perspective into clinical practice. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe the systemic concept of desire discrepancy within a couple.
    • List some common presentations of this clinical problem.
    • Recognize differences in the systemic relationship between desire discrepancy and other common relationship problems.
    • Compare the systemic nature of desire discrepancy to other more linear clinical approaches.
    • Formulate a systemic "big picture" description of the couple dynamics.
    • Demonstrate how to intervene in the couple system using this "big picture" to provide forward movement in the system.
    • Analyze family of origin, dyadic and intrapsychic issues displayed through the clients' sexual behavior. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Clinicians wishing to expand and update their expertise treating sexual desire discrepancy and other sexual difficulties. This 10-hour course will fulfill the BBS requirement for study of human sexuality.

    Level: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Monica Stone MFT maintains a full time private practice in Menlo Park where she treats couples and individuals and runs time limited women's sexuality groups. She has specialized in treating sexual issues since 1996, receiving her AASECT Sex Therapist Certification in 2001. 


    Cost: $288
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x762: Courageous Conversations about Culture and Diversity
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x762: Courageous Conversations about Culture and Diversity

    DATE: Saturday, November 8 *Must register by October 29

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.25 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This course explores how integration of both self-awareness and others' worldview has increased, but it continues to necessitate further development. It goes into the challenge that remains, how we address, integrate, and ultimately talk about matters of culture. In this workshop, the instructors propose an 8-step model for how to effectively engage in Courageous Conversations about culture and diversity. Their approach provides practical and enriching tools that further the concept of broaching cultural issues in clinical settings, supervisory relationships, the classroom, and organizations. They also facilitate experiential small group exercises that cultivate the essential skills that ultimately help us engage, connect, and build lasting relationships necessary for intimate and genuine dialogue regarding culture. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe the meaning of courageous conversations & their clinical importance.
    • Recognize the differences in the types of broaching.
    • Identify and apply guidelines to engaging in courageous conversations.
    • Demonstrate courageous conversations in small groups.
    • Design a plan of action for engaging in courageous conversations in your own applied settings.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Nurses, Physicians, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students, and Undergraduate Students. 

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Alicia del Prado is a psychologist who works in clinical and academic roles. She provides therapy and consulting services as well as teaches, conducts research, and facilitates seminars. She works with clients on a variety of concerns, such as depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship problems, body image, career issues, and stress management. She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Washington State University in 2007. She worked at U.C. Berkeley from 2006-2008 where she completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship. Prior to graduate school, she received her B.S. in Psychology from Santa Clara University in 2000.

    Dr. Kim is a cognitive-behavioral therapist whose primary areas of interest are child/adolescent development and minority mental health. Her clinical training and experience have involved working in multiple therapeutic contexts, the use of multidisciplinary resources and efforts, and the management of a diversity of mental health concerns. She has worked with children/adolescents and their families in the contexts of schools, day-treatment programs, hospitals, probation programs, foster care, residential care, social and protective services, home-based services, outpatient clinics, and private practice. She received her B.A. in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1995. She received her M.A. in Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1997 and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a Developmental Psychology minor at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Crew Reunion Row
  • Saturday, Oct 11, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Calling all Santa Clara Crew Alumni ports, starboards, and coxswains! Meet Coach Jay Farwell '94 at the Lexington Reservoir Boat House for a Crew reunion. We'll share memories and get a little water workout! All the fun of practice without the early pick up at Swig! We promise not to leave you behind if you catch a crab! Seriously though, is 10am too early for a black velvet?


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Lexington Reservoir
Cycling Club Ride
Day of Meditation and Mindfulness: Ignatian-Buddhist Dialogue and Practice
  • Saturday, Jan 31, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    January 31, 2015 | 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
    Multifaith Sanctuary, St. Joseph’s Hall

    Fee $30, lunch included

    Join us for a day of mindfulness and meditation in the Ignatian and Zen traditions. Experienced Dharma Teacher, and SCU Religious Studies Professor, Sarita Tamayo-Moraga and Robert Scholla, S.J., Bannan Faculty Fellow in the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education at Santa Clara University will guide participants through a series of meditation and mindfulness practices from the Catholic (Ignatian) and Buddhist (Zen) traditions. This retreat grows out of a yearlong dialogue and interreligious retreat both facilitators participated in, examining the intersections and distinctions among Zen Buddhist practice and Ignatian Spirituality. 

    Sarita Tamayo-Moraga is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University.  Her scholarship focuses on comparative mysticism (primarily Buddhism and Catholicism), and the use of mindfulness in pedagogy.  Her research focuses on how the spiritual practices of different religious traditions, especially Catholicism and Buddhism, transform suffering into peace, joy, and liberation.  The focus questions for her research are “Why is there so much hatred?  How can spiritual practice transform this?”  She is also Faculty Director of the UNITY Residential Learning Community at Santa Clara University and as such promotes its themes of diversity and civic engagement and is a bridge between the classroom and the residence hall for the students.  In this residence hall and others on campus, she regularly leads “De-stress with Mindfulness” sessions for students.  In addition, she has taught in the Summer LEAD program at Santa Clara University since 2005 and has also been the interim assistant director for this program which is for first-generation college students.  She is Roman Catholic and a Zen Teacher in the Soto Zen tradition and is a dharma heir of the late Darlene Cohen Roshi which means Sarita has been given formal permission within the lineage of Suzuki Roshi, founder of San Francisco Zen Center, to teach Zen independently.  Since 2005, she has co-facilitated two meditation groups on campus through the Ignatian Center at Santa Clara University.  Since 2008, she has also co-facilitated the Contemplatives in Action network on campus.  She is also guest teacher for the Crystal Springs Sangha in San Mateo, a Zen group and one of the Zen groups at Stanford University. 


    Robert W. Scholla S.J., is the Bannan Faculty Fellow in the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education at Santa Clara University. Rob holds a doctorate in Fundamental Theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. Although passionate about classroom work and having taught for almost forty years, over the years Rob’s pastoral labor has brought him to serve families seeking healing from domestic violence and young people in juvenile detention. For twenty-five years Rob has regularly offered Ignatian retreats and engaged in spiritual ministries. Having completed his term as rector of the Jesuit Community at Loyola Marymount University, Rob happily returns to service at Santa Clara.


    Location: St. Joseph's Hall, Multifaith Sanctuary
DC Networking Reception
Deadline for late registration/full refund/oral defense
Denver AFO- Volunteer at Greater Rockies Food Bank
DENVER Microbrew Tour
  • Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 3:00 PM

     

    Do not miss the SCU Denver Chapter Walking Microbrew Tour.  There is a limited capacity, so sign up today!

    The tour will begin at the River North Brewery and end at Rockbottom Brewery, with a few great stops along the way.  

    RSVP Online



     


    Cost: $20 per person
Denver, CO
Diaconate Ordination
Diaconate Reception
DISTINGUISED SPEAKER SERIES Remembering FDR
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here 

    Historians consistently rank Franklin D. Roosevelt as among the most consequential of presidents. His unmatched twelve-year-tenure in the White House changed the terms of life for generations of Americans thereafter, and transformed the international system as well as America’s role in it, in ways that persist well into the twenty-first century. This presentation will explore the sources – personal as well as historical – of Roosevelt’s remarkably deep and durable legacy.

    Speaker  David M. Kennedy is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History Emeritus and Director Emeritus of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. For more than four decades he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses at Stanford in the history of the twentieth-century United States, American political and social thought, American foreign policy, American literature, and the comparative development of democracy in Europe and America. Graduating seniors have four times elected him as Class Day speaker. He has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. In 2008, the Yale University Graduate School presented him with the Wilbur Cross Medal, its highest honor. He has also written about a broad range of subjects in American history. Originally from Seattle, he earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford in 1963 and his PhD from Yale University in 1968.

    Social Gathering:  9:30 AM - 10:00 AM  
    Event:  10:00 AM - 12:00 PM                           

    Event Location:  Fess Parker Studio Theatre 


     

     


    Cost: 25.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2015
Early Registration for Intersession 2015 & Spring 2015
Easter Bunny Brunch
Easter: Library Closed
EDUC x460: Kids 'N Books - Developing Strong Readers: Tips for Parents
  • Saturday, Oct 11, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    EDUC x460: Kids 'N Books - Developing Strong Readers: Tips for Parents

    DATE: Saturday, Oct. 11 *Must register by October 1

    TIME: 1-4 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $50 per person, $70 per couple

    Course meets the qualification for 3 hours of continuing education credit

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Parents and other family members add significantly to children's achievement in school by creating positive attitudes toward learning, a heightened sense of self-confidence, and pride in accomplishment based on hard work. We will investigate both what teachers learn from parents, and what parents can learn from teachers in service of children's learning in general, and higher reading achievement in particular.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

     

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Discover the answers to: Who are the successful readers? What can you do to help develop good readers?
    • Learn "before, during, and after" reading comprehension strategies, including how to develop children's prediction skills, what to do when a child can't read a particular word, and how/when to ask good questions
    • Explore and implement guidelines for reading aloud
    • Identify good books that are at your child's age and developmental level (You will receive suggestions for choosing and judging children's literature and a list of websites for finding current children's books as well as "all-time favorites.")
    • Practice oral reading techniques using children's favorite books and poems

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Teachers
    • Parents
    • Older Siblings
    • Guardians
    • Foster Parents
    • Anyone interested in helping children develop their self confidence in reading

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION

    M. Priscilla Myers, Ph.D., is a senior lecturer in reading curriculum and instruction in the Department of Education at Santa Clara University. Priscilla has taught for 40 years at the university level and in public and private elementary and secondary schools in the United States, France, Norway, England, and Japan. She earned a Ph.D. in reading curriculum and instruction in 1992 from the University of Texas at Austin; an M.A. in reading education in 1982 from the University of Colorado; and a B.A. in modern languages-French from Colorado State University in 1973. The major focus of her research is in the areas of literacy instruction and teacher education.


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
EDUC x511: When She's Pregnant - The Father's Perspective
  • Saturday, Oct 25, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

     EDUC x511: When She is Pregnant: The Dad's Perspective

    DATE: Saturday, October 25 *Must register by October 11

    TIME: 9-12PM 

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $50 per person. Special Offer for Couples: $70 per couple. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Although men are excluded from the biological experience of pregnancy, expectant fathers are commonly psychologically just as pregnant as their partners. Currently, men desire and are expected to be increasingly involved during pregnancy, birth, and the early years of child raising. The extra care and attention on the pregnant woman is surely as it should be. Yet, as much as men are encouraged, invited and even cajoled into pregnancy and childbirth, they also receive an unspoken message that their own worries, concerns and thoughts are quite unwelcome. If a couple is to work together most effectively during the pregnancy and early months of their child’s life, it is essential that they both know more fully their partner’s experience

      The current workshop focuses on the best ways to increase a man’s involvement and for the couple to operate more as a team during pregnancy, childbirth and later parenting. The most common worries, anxieties and concerns that men experience during those precious nine months are described, based on over forty years of research. The workshop concludes with clear practical advice to the couple to help include the new dad more fully and to help expectant fathers find ways to deal with their most natural anxieties (protecting and providing, health and safety etc.)

    Learning Objectives

     

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Participants will learn about men's “prime directive” – to protect and provide
    • Participants will learn about the pregnancy double-bind for men and how to deal with it
    • Participants will learn about parent team building
    • Participants will learn about the seven most common worries expectant dads face

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Parents
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists
    • Marriage & Family Therapists
    • Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
    • Physicians
    • Others

    Instructor Bio

    Jerrold Lee Shapiro, Ph.D., ABMP, CGP is a Professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University (about to begin his 45th year as a full-time college professor). He is also a licensed clinical psychologist. He has worked extensively with several students (including his two children) and families going through the college transition. A veteran of workshops and media appearances (including Oprah, CNN, the CBS News and Morning Shows, PBS, etc.), he regularly speaks to parent groups on a variety of topics involving effective parenting.  


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x515: Children of Addicted Parents in the Classroom
  • Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x515: Children of Addicted Parents in the Classroom

    DATE: Saturday, September 27 *Must register by September 17

    TIME: 9-5PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $192

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This class provides specifics about unspoken concerns children bring to school, and roles they may have adopted at home that are problematic in the school setting. Without attempting to diagnose or confront the child or family, school staff can help through teaching specific problem-solving skills, offering appropriate kinds of support, and providing a caring, safe, and predictable environment. Children can become more successful as students, as they begin to access more aspects of their personalities and range of behaviors, and increase their resiliency. This course teaches about the disease model of addiction; family dynamics illustrated by children's artwork; roles children of addiction often take; characteristic concerns of these children, and resiliency research findings. All of these topics are explained in the context of school behavior, and specific strategies will be offered. The class format is lecture, small group discussion, role-play, video, music, and experiencing some activities that can be done with the whole class. Write-ups of those activities which are modeled after the Betty Ford Center Children's program are provided, as well as bibliographies with both children's books and resource books for professionals.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

     

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Understand the disease of addiction and how it affects all members of the family
    • Be able to identify the roles children often take, how those roles create behaviors that are problematic in the classroom
    • Have some strategies to assist children in adapting the positive value of those roles in the classroom
    • Be informed about resiliency research and how to foster greater resiliency for all students in the classroom
    • Experience some activities to help understand concepts as well as to use in the classroom

    Target Audience: Teachers, School Administrators, and other school staff.

    Instructor Bio

    Wendy Wade has been involved with children and parents throughout her career, beginning with her work with children of addicted parents in 1979, through elementary school teaching, in both private and public schools, and administration as Principal of a public school.  She worked at Betty Ford Center as Coordinator of their unique program for children of addicted parents, and has provided many trainings and conference presentations, both locally and nationally, on both the disease of addiction and working with children of addicted parents.  She has combined her experience in education with her psychotherapy training to work for Santa Cruz County Children’s Mental Health. She enjoys lecturing in Master’s in counseling programs, and has recently begun a private practice in the Santa Cruz area. Her education includes a BA in psychology from Stanford University, a Master’s Degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Santa Clara University, a teaching credential from San Jose State University, an Educational Administration credential from Santa Clara University, and a PhD from Pacifica Graduate Institute.  She has an LPCC license and is certified as a CADC 1 counselor.  


    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers

    DATE: Saturday, November 8 *Must register by Wednesday, October 29

    TIME: 8AM - 5PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 135

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement. 

    Register for fall »

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse; staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.

     


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 135
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 to Friday, Oct 31, 2014

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)

    DATE: October 27 through October 31, 2014 *Must register by October 24

    TIME: Any time that works for you.

    LOCATION: Anywhere you have access to the internet.

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement. 

    Register for fall »

     

    *Must register by Friday, October 24.

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 
     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems. 
    TARGET AUDIENCE
    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Online
EDUC x602: Leadership and Emotional Intelligence
  • Saturday, Sep 20, 2014 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 at 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    EDUC x602 – Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

    DATE: Saturday, Sept. 20 and Saturday, Sept. 27 *Must register by September 17

    This is a 2-day workshop

    TIME: 9-12PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $144

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Thousands of books have been written on leadership yet being an effective and good leader remains a challenge.  Combining leadership and emotional intelligence help you influence others, build full commitment, make great decisions, and lead and live to your highest intentions. EQ and Emotional Intelligence are sometimes used interchangeably.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
     
    This short course will provide the opportunity for leaders to reflect on:
    • Six Seconds EQ Model
    • Emotions as Assets
    • EQ in Action

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Teachers and Educational Leaders

     INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Susan Charles, Ed.D., has more than 30 years of experience as a teacher, counselor, and administrator in K–12 education. Originally from the island of Dominica, in the West Indies, she has lived with her family in the Bay Area since 1975 and worked with the Palo Alto Unified School District (PAUSD) for 28 years. Susan has served in numerous roles in her nearly three decades with PAUSD: working as a counselor, dean of students, head of guidance, and principal. She is a trainer with the 6Seconds organization in emotional intelligence and teaching to the social and emotional wellbeing of children and adults.


    Cost: $144
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Saturday, Sep 13, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED

    DATE: Saturday, September 13 *Must register by September 3

    TIME: 8:30AM-12:30PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    WORKSHOP FEE: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION

    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Thursday, Oct 16, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Thursday, October 16 *Must register by October 8

    Time: 8:30AM-12:30PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION

    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Monday, November 17 *Must register by November 5

    Time: 1-4PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION

    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online Course)
  • Monday, Jun 16, 2014 to Wednesday, Dec 31, 2014

    EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online)

    DATE: Since this is an online, asynchronous course, there is NO official start date.  A link to the course will be sent within 72 hours of registration, at which point you will have a minimum of two weeks and a maximum of six months to complete the course. The link will be sent to the email address you provide during registration.

    TIME: At your convenience. 

    LOCATION: Online

    Workshop Fee: $285

    Register Here! 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Welcome to Advanced Classroom Management: Children as Change Agents, a course geared primarily for professionals (e.g., regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologist, counselors) serving children and youths presenting behavior problems in the school or community.  This course focuses on cognitive and cognitive-behavioral interventions (often lumped together under the rubric "social skills") with an emphasis on teaching students how to change and manage their own behavior.  Since previous knowledge and understanding of traditional behavioral (operant) concepts and strategies is required, it is strongly recommended that you take an introductory behavior management course to learn the basic terms and concepts of behavior management prior to taking this “advanced” course.
     
    OBJECTIVES

    As a result of this course, participants will demonstrate their ability to:

    • Know the terminology in the areas of behavior management, self-management and cognitive-behavior modification
    • Know the relative merits and limitations of the behavioral and social-cognitive approaches to behavior management
    • Understand the rationale for teaching students how to self-manage their behavior  
    • Understand the roles that cognitions and emotions play in the development of behavior problems
    • Apply the self-management strategies covered in the course to the behavior problems of their own students 
    • Diagnose behavior problems and assess the efficacy of self-management interventions
    • Increase the probability of students using self-management strategies in and outside of the classroom setting 
EDUC x913: Rules for Alphas: The Methodology of Exceptional People Who Make an Impact
  • Saturday, Nov 1, 2014 at 10:00 AM to Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 at 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x913: Rules for Alphas: The Methodology of Exceptional People Who Make an Impact

    DATE: 2-day workshop Saturday, November 1 & Saturday, November 8

    *Must register by October 29

    TIME: 10AM-5 PM each day

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    Workshop Fee: $336

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    As we see in the media and our day-to-day lives, the world is rife with examples of successful, but often uninspiring or even infamous, leaders, and entrepreneurs--but what about those extraordinary, impactful individuals who seem to transcend this paradigm--who have wildly successful careers, who are healthy and balanced, who have happy and productive relationships, and who are making a positive difference in the world?
     
    The secret to their success isn't magic--in fact there are specific habits and systems that exceptional people have in common--and, even better, their methodology can be learned. In this workshop, we'll discuss the science behind exceptional people with the aim of applying and sustaining habits and systems in our own lives that will help us to stand out from the crowd and accelerate our personal and professional success. Areas of focus include health and wellness, finances, ethics, relationships, career and achievement, and community impact.
     
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    • Understand the Optimize-Visualize-Strategize model & explain how it can be applied to their lives.
    • Identify one habit/system from the workshop that they have already put into practice in their daily lives.
    • Identify 3 to 5 additional habits/systems from the workshop that they plan to put into practice over the next three to six months.
    • Produce and present (optional) vision boards for their lives & identify their top three goals, including mesures for each goal.
    • Articulate a strategic plan (including timelines, measures, & tracking systems) for how to achieve at least one of their chosen goals.

    Target Audience

    • Young or mid-level professionals who aspire leadership or senior leadership positions 
    • Persons in the midst of a job search or a career change
    • Undergraduate and graduate students near the end of their programs
    • Persons looking for personal enrichment resources
    Instructor Bio
    Danielle Harlan is the Founder of Rules For Alphas. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science and Masters in education from Stanford University, where she was a Jacob K. Javits National Fellow and a Centennial Teaching Award recipient for outstanding teaching. Prior to launching Rules For Alphas, Danielle was the Chief of Operations for the Carnegie Foundation, an organization devoted to harnessing the power of networks and quality improvement strategies in order to solve important educational problems. In addition to teaching in the U.S., she has taught in Brazil, China, Costa Rica, and South Africa. Danielle is a member of the International Leadership Association, the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, the National Association for Female Executives, and is a certified fitness instructor. 
     

    Cost: $336
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Engineering Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Engineering


    Location: Locatelli Center
Estate Planning for the Not So Rich and Famous
Ethics After Dark
  • Thursday, Oct 9, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Join the staff and alumni of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics for wine and hors d'oeurves, and a chance to reconnect. We'll have a mini-lecture on heroism by Scott LaBarge, associate professor of philosophy and classics, and a brief update on the Ethics Center's work.

    Professor LaBarge received the Arnold L. and Lois S. Graves Award in 2004 in recognition of his accomplishments in the classroom, and was recognized with the Brutocao Award for Teaching Excellence at SCU in 2012.

    Visit the Grand Reunion Schedule and RSVP today >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Vari Hall Foyer
Ethics: There's an App for That
Faculty Chamber Music
Fall Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni.


    Location: Malley Center
Fall Semester 2014 Ends
Family Day at the de Saisset Museum
Family Weekend
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 to Saturday, Feb 21, 2015

     Santa Clara parents are important members of the SCU community. We thank each family for their support and partnership with all students through their journey here at Santa Clara University.

    We want to extend a special invitation to join us on campus for the 2015 Family Weekend. These events provide you with a great opportunity to learn more about the University and spend some quality time in a fun, social environment with your SCU student.

Feast of Juan Diego
Festival of Lights: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     A festival of lights can have many religious and cultural meanings for people across the world. The Jewish holiday, Hanukkah and the Hindu holiday, Diwali (Tihar), both draw on the imagery of lighting lamps or candles. Culturally, many cities celebrate the change of seasons and the lengthening of days by lighting landmarks in vast and complex displays, and here at Santa Clara University, the Festival of Lights performance has marked the beginning of the holiday season for many for over a decade. The Festival of Lights program draws on many traditions, those formed here and those celebrated across the world, as it explores the changes of the seasons, a variety of holiday traditions, and concludes with a stunning arrangement of Silent Night sung by candle light in the beautiful Santa Clara Mission Church. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers
Film Odyssey: A Method to the Madness - A Brief History of Acting in Film
  • Wednesday, Sep 24, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Oct 8, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Oct 15, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
Forging a Greener Tomorrow
Fr. Coz Rugby Banquet
  • Saturday, Oct 11, 2014 at 6:30 PM

    This banquet is in memory of Father Coz and his remarkable contribution to the university and our rugby program. We welcome all alumni, parents, and families to the event as we join to celebrate the success of the Santa Clara University Men’s Rugby Program.

     

    Click here to RSVP


    Cost: $100; Recent Alumni $75, Sponsor player $100, Table sign $200
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Freshman/Sophomore Internship Fair
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU freshmen & sophomores of all majors.


    Location: Locatelli Center
Fresno Summer Send Off Reception
  • Friday, Sep 5, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

     

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Tom '85 & Karen '86 Ferdinandi.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.

     

    BBQ Dinner ~ Casual Attire

    RSVP by calling the Ferdinandi’s at (559) 436-1915 or email to the4ferds@sbcglobal.net


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Sierra Swim & Raquet Club
Fusion: Santa Clara University Choirs and Orchestra
  • Friday, Jun 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The final concert of the year is a collaboration between the Santa Clara University choirs and orchestras. The evening’s program is eclectic and features selections from Mozart’sVespers.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Gangs in San Jose: An Important Dimension of Our Current Society
  • Monday, Oct 6, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    Every ethnic group in San Jose is represented by a gang, including a white hate gang. There are two dimensions of how the City of San Jose is responding to the fact that more than 4,000 men and women have been identified as active gang members. The first deals with enforcement, as gangs are often involved in crimes of a violent nature. The second is programs to deal with gang issues through a Task Force headed by Mayor Chuck Reed. These programs deal with things like school and park safety, anti-graffiti, tattoo removal and providing a positive alternative to gang lifestyle and culture. This course is a logical extension to the class on U.S. immigration policy, since young immigrants are often targeted for gang recruitment. The class will provide an understanding of both law enforcement and the programs that deal with the gangs in San Jose.

     

     
    Instructor: 
    Mario Maciel, City of San Jose Division Manager of Youth Intervention Services, has been a long time employee of the City of San Jose. He is an original member of the Mayor’s Task Force appointed to deal with the issues raised by San Jose’s gangs and to assist in developing programs to deal with the them. He will be assisted by a representative of the Gang Investigative Unit of the San Jose Police Department, in the teaching of this course.

    Short Course: October 6 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
General Registration for Spring Semester 2015
Gerald McKevitt, S.J. Lecture: "The Impact of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus on Education"
Gettysburg: Three Days That Shaped A Nation
  • Thursday, Nov 13, 2014 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    The course is designed to give participants insights into one of the most famous battles in American history. On July 1st through the 3rd in 1863, over 180,000 troops clashed in what turned out to be the most decisive battle of the American Civil War. On July 4th of that year, when the nation would normally be celebrating the 4th of July, citizens of a prosperous farming community in southern Pennsylvania were dealing with the wide scale carnage (over 50,000 casualties) that disrupted their otherwise peaceful agrarian existence.   

    We will examine the strategic and tactical implications of the battle, and how General Robert E. Lee needed a decisive victory in order to muster the support of European sympathizers such as Great Britain—who depended on the burgeoning cotton industry in the South to drive their own industrial transformation with the textile industry. The narrative (lecture) will be accompanied by period photos (Brady & Sullivan) and original artwork (Troiani), to give participants a sense of the period and the intensity of the battle. The lecture will be all inclusive, starting with the first day’s hostilities along McPherson Ridge to the northwest of Gettysburg; and culminating in the desperation move on the part of General Lee known as Pickett’s Charge, when nearly 15,000 Confederate troops of the Army of Northern Virginia clashed “head on” into the well fortified Union lines along Seminary Ridge—located directly south of the town. We will discuss how serendipitous this battle really was—and how a union victory was not etched in stone. Key accounts of senior officers and generals will also be covered in some detail, as deliberations among the commanders of these two great armies led to decisions that played a major role as to the ultimate outcome of the battle. 

    The course is designed for the novice, armchair historian. Participants may have visited the scene of the battle and be seeking clarity and a better understanding of the participants and the commanders who led them; but this is not essential to enjoying the course. A few readings will be made available, along with a comprehensive reading list for those who would like to delve further and learn more about the battle. 

    Instructor: 

    Bill Cleary received his undergraduate and graduate degree (MS, social science) from the State University of New York, College at Buffalo, where he was recently honored (June of 2013) with the Distinguished Alumni Award. Upon graduation in 1973, Mr. Cleary embarked on a career as a history teacher at Lakeshore High School in Angola, New York. In addition, he completed extended graduate study at the University of Buffalo and Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, where he was Fulbright scholar studying ancient Egyptian history and archeology. Mr. Cleary first visited the battlefield at Gettysburg in 1961 as a young boy, and he was inspired to make it one of his life long passions. Since that first visit, he has returned on at least 20 occasions to further his understanding of what actually transpired on those three memorable days in 1863.
     
    In 1978, Mr. Cleary left his teaching position and began a second career as a marketing professional in New York. He moved to California in 1981, after accepting a position in Apple’s advertising and marketing group. In 1987, Mr. Cleary founded the CKS Group, which filed for a successful IPO in 1995, making it one of the first marketing firms to achieve that distinction in the digital age. Since leaving the company he founded (in 1998), Mr. Cleary has been active with numerous charitable initiatives, including African Wildlife (Dr. Richard Leakey), education and the arts. Mr. Cleary is past Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.  He has lectured at the SCU business school for the past 20 years, with a specific focus on branding and marketing. Over the past 12 months, Mr. Cleary has been a featured lecturer at SCU, SUNY College at Buffalo, Harvard and Gettysburg College. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 13 & November 20

    Location: Daly Science 207

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Nov 20, 2014 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    The course is designed to give participants insights into one of the most famous battles in American history. On July 1st through the 3rd in 1863, over 180,000 troops clashed in what turned out to be the most decisive battle of the American Civil War. On July 4th of that year, when the nation would normally be celebrating the 4th of July, citizens of a prosperous farming community in southern Pennsylvania were dealing with the wide scale carnage (over 50,000 casualties) that disrupted their otherwise peaceful agrarian existence.   

    We will examine the strategic and tactical implications of the battle, and how General Robert E. Lee needed a decisive victory in order to muster the support of European sympathizers such as Great Britain—who depended on the burgeoning cotton industry in the South to drive their own industrial transformation with the textile industry. The narrative (lecture) will be accompanied by period photos (Brady & Sullivan) and original artwork (Troiani), to give participants a sense of the period and the intensity of the battle. The lecture will be all inclusive, starting with the first day’s hostilities along McPherson Ridge to the northwest of Gettysburg; and culminating in the desperation move on the part of General Lee known as Pickett’s Charge, when nearly 15,000 Confederate troops of the Army of Northern Virginia clashed “head on” into the well fortified Union lines along Seminary Ridge—located directly south of the town. We will discuss how serendipitous this battle really was—and how a union victory was not etched in stone. Key accounts of senior officers and generals will also be covered in some detail, as deliberations among the commanders of these two great armies led to decisions that played a major role as to the ultimate outcome of the battle. 

    The course is designed for the novice, armchair historian. Participants may have visited the scene of the battle and be seeking clarity and a better understanding of the participants and the commanders who led them; but this is not essential to enjoying the course. A few readings will be made available, along with a comprehensive reading list for those who would like to delve further and learn more about the battle. 

    Instructor: 

    Bill Cleary received his undergraduate and graduate degree (MS, social science) from the State University of New York, College at Buffalo, where he was recently honored (June of 2013) with the Distinguished Alumni Award. Upon graduation in 1973, Mr. Cleary embarked on a career as a history teacher at Lakeshore High School in Angola, New York. In addition, he completed extended graduate study at the University of Buffalo and Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, where he was Fulbright scholar studying ancient Egyptian history and archeology. Mr. Cleary first visited the battlefield at Gettysburg in 1961 as a young boy, and he was inspired to make it one of his life long passions. Since that first visit, he has returned on at least 20 occasions to further his understanding of what actually transpired on those three memorable days in 1863.
     
    In 1978, Mr. Cleary left his teaching position and began a second career as a marketing professional in New York. He moved to California in 1981, after accepting a position in Apple’s advertising and marketing group. In 1987, Mr. Cleary founded the CKS Group, which filed for a successful IPO in 1995, making it one of the first marketing firms to achieve that distinction in the digital age. Since leaving the company he founded (in 1998), Mr. Cleary has been active with numerous charitable initiatives, including African Wildlife (Dr. Richard Leakey), education and the arts. Mr. Cleary is past Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.  He has lectured at the SCU business school for the past 20 years, with a specific focus on branding and marketing. Over the past 12 months, Mr. Cleary has been a featured lecturer at SCU, SUNY College at Buffalo, Harvard and Gettysburg College. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 13 & November 20

    Location: Daly Science 207

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Gianera Society Lunch
Good Friday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
GTU Administrative Holiday
Hans Boepple - Piano
  • Saturday, Oct 4, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     Hans Boepple, an artist who shows rich musicality alongside stunning technical command, has appeared with many distinguished orchestras. His debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra at age 10 set in motion collaborations with orchestras and conductors of international reputation. Boepple is a guest artist on solo and orchestral concert series across the United States. The Washington Star calls him "...a greatly gifted pianist" and the Los Angeles times hails that Hans Boepple is "...an accomplished interpreter".


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
History Department Reunion Reception
Holiday Dinner
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Join us for our annual Holiday Dinner.

    Date:  Monday, November 24, 2014 

    Time: 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
     
    Location: CA Mission Room, Benson Memorial Center
     
    Event:  Dinner and Entertainment
     
    Cost:  $45
      
    Dinner will be preceded by a social gathering. The dinner will take place in the beautiful California Mission Room, located in Benson Memorial Center, and is always a sell-out.

     


    Cost: 45.00
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Homecoming Picnic Co-Sponsored by the Athletics Department
Independence Day: Administrative holiday/Library Closed
Indonesian Immersion
Indonesian Immersion
Instruction Begins for Fall Semester 2014
Intersession 2015 Begins
Intersession 2015 Ends
Jazz Band/Combo Concert
  • Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band and Combo present concerts throughout the academic year. These exciting programs feature music in the American jazz tradition from the bright energy of the Big Band era all the way forward to the jazz music of today. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Nov 20, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
John Coleman, S.J. Lecture: The Impact of the Jesuit Restoration on Education
  • Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 at 7:00 PM

    In an engaging, visually rich presentation, Fr. Tom Lucas S.J., Rector of the Jesuit Community and University Professor of Art at Seattle University, will detail the cultural, political, and religious context of some of the least understood and most controversial moments in Jesuit history, when the Society of Jesus was officially closed down by the papacy and reconstituted almost three decades later. Residual echoes of this remarkable intervention were still heard in Jesuit institutions throughout the twentieth century.

    Thomas Lucas S.J., University Professor and rector of the Jesuit Community at Seattle University, received his doctorate in Theology and the Arts at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA, in 1992. He also holds degrees from the Pontificia Università Gregoriana, Rome; Fordham University, New York; The Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley, and Santa Clara University, California. Lucas is an internationally recognized expert in Jesuit art history, and is well known as a liturgical designer and artist with an international portfolio.


    As a graduate student, Lucas designed and directed the restoration of the sixteenth century rooms of St. Ignatius in Rome, and curated an exhibit on Jesuit architecture at the Vatican Library. In the course of that work, he also edited, contributed to, and designed the exhibit catalogue Saint, Site, and Sacred Strategy, (Vatican City: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Press, 1990). His book Landmarking: City, Church, and Jesuit Urban Strategy (Chicago: Loyola Press, 1997) won an Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) National Book Award in 2000. He has also edited a festschrift and is the author of a dozen articles.

    After serving for three years as the National Secretary for Communications at the US Jesuit Conference, Washington D.C., Lucas joined the faculty at the University of San Francisco in 1995. There he was founding chair of the Fine and Performing Arts and founding director of the Thacher Gallery at USF (1998) and the Kalmanovitz Sculpture Terrace (2008). He curated more than 80 exhibits on campus. Lucas has also lectured at more than 20 universities in the U.S., Europe, Mexico, and Asia. A tenured full professor, he was named USF’s first University Professor in 2010. Lucas' work as a liturgical designer has been recognized with an award from the American Institute of Architects, and his projects range from glass and liturgical furnishing designs for more than a dozen churches and chapels to service as design and technical consultant for the restoration of the St. Ignatius Cathedral, Shanghai, PRC. In 2013 he was named Rector of the Jesuit Community at Seattle University, where he also serves as University Professor and Curator of the University Art Collection.  

    - See more at: http://scu.edu/ic/bannan/2014-15/fall.cfm?b=474&c=20048#sthash.HWg6H1J9.dpuf

     


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
John Kennedy, Musical Mavericks
John Steinbeck's California: Living in Place
  • Tuesday, Sep 23, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Sep 30, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 7, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
JST Admissions Visit: 2014 Call to Action Conference
  • Friday, Nov 7, 2014 to Sunday, Nov 9, 2014

    JST Admissions @ the 2014 Call to Action Conference:

    November 7-9, 2014
    2014 Call To Action Conference
    Exhibit Hall
    Memphis, Tennessee

    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Memphis!


    Location:
         Exhibit Hall
JST Admissions Visit: 2014 Faith Formation Conference
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 to Saturday, Nov 22, 2014

    JST Admissions @ the 2014 Faith Formation Conference:

    November 21-22, 2014
    2014 Faith Formation Conference
    Exhibit Hall
    Santa Clara Convention Center
    Santa Clara, CA
     
    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Santa Clara!

     


    Location:
         Santa Clara Convention Center
JST Admissions Visit: Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
  • Friday, Mar 13, 2015 to Sunday, Mar 15, 2015

    JST Admissions at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress:

    March 13-15, 2015
    Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
    Exhibit Hall
    Anaheim Convention Center
    Anaheim, California

    Email or call for an appointment to meet wtih us while we are in Anaheim!


    Location:
         Anaheim Convention Center
JST Admissions Visit: Loyola Marymount University
  • Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    JST Admissions @ Loyola Marymount University:

    October 28, 2014
    12pm - 2pm
    Loyola Marymount University Graduate School Fair
    Los Angeles, CA

    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in LA!

     


    Location:
         Loyola Marymount University
JST Admissions Visit: St. Mary's College of California
  • Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    JST Admissions @ St. Mary's College of California:

    October 1, 2014
    12pm-2pm
    St. Mary's Graduate School Fair
    St. Mary's College California
    Moraga, California

    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Moraga!

     


    Location:
         St. Mary's College of California
JST Baccalaureate Liturgy
Labor Day: Administrative Holiday/Library Closed
Land Grabs, Murder, Women's Rights, Free Speech and More...Historical Legal Cases That Shaped Santa Clara County
  • Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Wednesday, Oct 8, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Wednesday, Oct 15, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
Late Registration for Fall Semester 2014
Late Registration Spring Semester 2015
Law Reunion Weekend
  • Saturday, Sep 6, 2014 at 12:15 PM

    Ten reunion classes will return to campus to reminisce with their classmates and reconnect with Faculty and Staff.  Law classes include 1964, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009.


    Cost: see website
Law Reunion Weekend
  • Sunday, Sep 7, 2014 at 10:00 AM

    Ten reunion classes will return to campus to reminisce with their classmates and reconnect with Faculty and Staff. Law classes include 1964, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009.


    Cost: see website
Leavey School of Business Reception
Levi's Stadium Tour
London Reception
  • Thursday, Sep 4, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Alumni Association is excited to be travelling to England with alumni, friends, faculty, and staff.
    Join us for a cocktail reception to celebrate the Bronco community.

    RSVP HERE


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Imperial College
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles President's Club Dinner
  • Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Michael E. Engh, S.J., President of Santa Clara University cordially invites you to the Los Angeles President’s Club Dinner honoring members of the President’s Club and the 37th Annual Santa Claran of the Year award recipient(s) (still to be named).  


    Location:
         The California Club
Los Angeles- Mass and Lunch with Fr. Engh
Marin 81st Annual Dinner
  • Thursday, Sep 18, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    Join us for a great night of SCU tradition, with special university guest, Dan Coonan, Director of Athletics & Recreation!

    RSVP here.

     

     


    Cost: $50 per person, $40 Young Alumni (2005-2014)
    Location:
         The Spinnaker Restaurant
Marriage: What's Love Got to Do With It?
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Mass of Gathering followed by barbecue
  • Friday, Sep 5, 2014 at 5:15 PM

    The JST community comes together to begin the academic year in prayer and thanksgiving


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel, Manresa, Compania, Patio
MBA / MS Info Sessions
Memorial Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Memory Workshop
  • Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If you think your memory isn't as good as it used to be or would like to learn some tricks on how to improve memory, then this workshop is for you. It's a little known fact that people with very good memory were made, not born. In other words, there are things we can do to improve our memory, no matter if our memory is very good or if we often find ourselves looking around the room wondering why we came in here in the first place. Workshop participants will understand more about why memory fails us and how to avoid those memory failures by learning some easy-to-use memory enhancing techniques.

     
    Instructor
    Dr. Patti Simoneis anAssociate Professor in the Psychology Department at Santa Clara University, where she teaches a variety of courses related to the relationship between the brain and behavior, including Psychopharmacology, Human Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience lab classes. Her research interests are in cognitive aging, and she examines memory and attention abilities in both younger and older adults. Together with Dr. Matt Bell, she runs SCU's Learning and Memory Lab, which annually involves undergraduate research assistants in experimental design, data collection, presentation, and manuscript writing.

    Short Course:  November 11, 18 

    Class Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Nov 18, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If you think your memory isn't as good as it used to be or would like to learn some tricks on how to improve memory, then this workshop is for you. It's a little known fact that people with very good memory were made, not born. In other words, there are things we can do to improve our memory, no matter if our memory is very good or if we often find ourselves looking around the room wondering why we came in here in the first place. Workshop participants will understand more about why memory fails us and how to avoid those memory failures by learning some easy-to-use memory enhancing techniques.

     
    Instructor
    Dr. Patti Simoneis anAssociate Professor in the Psychology Department at Santa Clara University, where she teaches a variety of courses related to the relationship between the brain and behavior, including Psychopharmacology, Human Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience lab classes. Her research interests are in cognitive aging, and she examines memory and attention abilities in both younger and older adults. Together with Dr. Matt Bell, she runs SCU's Learning and Memory Lab, which annually involves undergraduate research assistants in experimental design, data collection, presentation, and manuscript writing.

    Short Course:  November 11, 18 

    Class Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Men's Basketball Red & White Scrimmage
Men's Lacrosse Alumni Game
Men's Soccer vs. USF
Midterm Madness
  • Thursday, Oct 9, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Oct 16, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Oct 23, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Nov 6, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Monterey/Salinas Summer Send Off Reception
  • Tuesday, Sep 9, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Mark '71 & Patti '71 Boitano.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.  

    Dessert Reception ~ Casual Attire 
    RSVP by calling Patti at (831) 624-8608 or email boitano@sbcglobal.net


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         The Boitano Residence
More "Dubliners"
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Araby and The Dead are, justifiably, the two most famous short stories written by the great Irish Modernist, James Joyce. But this course will focus on some of his lesser known, and equally rewarding works of short fiction. We’ll discuss Joyce’s use of narrative technique, epiphanies, and point-of-view; and examine how even in self-imposed exile, he still was held captive by his native Dublin. Stories to be read will include Eveline, Two Gallants, and A Painful Case

    Instructor: James Harvillerecently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory. In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives. Especially Mr. Harville’s. Every time.
     
    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 10, 17

    Location:  Sobrato Hall Room B & C


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Araby and The Dead are, justifiably, the two most famous short stories written by the great Irish Modernist, James Joyce. But this course will focus on some of his lesser known, and equally rewarding works of short fiction. We’ll discuss Joyce’s use of narrative technique, epiphanies, and point-of-view; and examine how even in self-imposed exile, he still was held captive by his native Dublin. Stories to be read will include Eveline, Two Gallants, and A Painful Case

    Instructor: James Harvillerecently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory. In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives. Especially Mr. Harville’s. Every time.
     
    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 10, 17

    Location:  Sobrato Hall Room B & C


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
Nancy Wait-Kromm - Soprano Voice
Navigating the College Enrollment Process
New Music Ensemble Concert
New Music Festival
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM to Friday, Jan 30, 2015

    The 2015 New Music Festival at Santa Clara University will celebrate the life and work of Alvin Lucier, American composer and pioneer of experimental music and sound installations. The Festival comprises three days of concerts, lectures, and workshops with the presence of the composer himself.

    Lucier has been a pioneer in many areas of music composition and performance, including the notation of performer's physical gestures, the use of brain waves in live performance, and the evocation of room acoustics for musical purposes.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Nov 15, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Palm Springs Summer Send Off Reception
  • Thursday, Sep 11, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM

     

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Palm Springs Chapter Co-Presidents, Larry Specchierla '63 & David Doyle '60.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.  

    Pizza Dinner Reception ~ Casual Attire
    RSVP by calling Larry at (760) 327-0912 or email lspecchierla@earthlink.net


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Piero's PizzaVino
Pasadena Summer Send Off Reception
  • Wednesday, Sep 3, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

      

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Patti '90 and Matt Pascale.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.

     

    Dinner Reception ~ Casual Attire

    RSVP by contacting Patti at thepascales@sbcglobal.net or (626)451-5812.


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         The Pascale Residence
Peninsula AFO- Painting at St. Francis Center in Redwood City
Peninsula Summer Send Off Reception
  • Thursday, Sep 4, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

     

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!

    The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Heidi '84, Jay '85, Robert '13 and Christina '16 Leupp.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.

    Hors d'oeuvres Reception ~ Casual Attire

    RSVP by contacting Maria in the Alumni Office at 408-554-5004 or mvonmassenhausen@scu.edu.


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         The Leupp Residence
Phoenix Summer Send Off Reception
  • Monday, Sep 15, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

       

    Welcome to the Class of 2018!  The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity to meet with other incoming students from your area before you enter SCU.  You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Ellen and Dave Grounds '88.  This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates.

     

    Dessert Reception ~ Casual Attire

    RSVP to Maria in the Alumni Office by calling 408-554-5004 or mvonmassenhausen@scu.edu


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         the Grounds Residence
Plundered Art: From Nebuchadnezzar to Nero, Napoleon and the Nazis
  • Saturday, Sep 27, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    In recent years, many leading museums have found themselves at the center of controversies focusing on whether they have developed their antiquities collections unethically.
     
    This course focuses on the ethics of art collecting and offers historic examples of plundering from Nebuchadnezzar to the Nazis. The theft of art is hardly a modern phenomenon.  Verres, a greedy Roman governor of Sicily, illegally amassed astonishing stolen civic treasures. The Roman Emperor Nero robbed Pergamon of its most famous sculpture of the Hellenistic world, the Laocoon group, and installed it in his notorious Golden House.  The Venetian Sack of Constantinople in 1204, the Conquistadores’ sack of Mexico and Peru in the 16th century, French and British expeditions in Egypt and Mesopotamia all provide examples of a trend that lives on today.  This can be seen in such examples as the pillaging of the Iraqi Museum in Baghdad as well as other sacred Iraqi sites and whether the U.S. is somehow complicit.  Our cultural odyssey following plundered art will be global in nature and will cover millennia of purloined treasures.
     
    Instructor: 
    Patrick Hunt received his Ph.D. from the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, University of London and has taught at Stanford University since 1993. He is also an associate at the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.  His articles have appeared in World Archaeology and the Journal of Roman Archaeology, and in many other publications.  He is the author of eleven books, including Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History  and Puer Natus Est: Art of Christmas.  Hunt was director of the National Geographic Society Hannibal Expedition (2007-2008) and has been the director of the Stanford Alpine Archaeology Project since 1994.

    Long Course: