Events

Upcoming events within the Ignatian Center.

"The Clue to Everything:" A History of Sicily
  • Saturday, Mar 7, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Sicily is the most magical, mythic, monster-plagued, and mistreated place in the Mediterranean, and mother of some of the foundation stories of Western Civilization.  In following a chronology of her three thousand years, we’ll meet heroes from Ulysses, Æneas, and Archimedes to Giovanni Falcone, and monsters from Cyclops to mafiosi from Corleone. We’ll examine how Sicily became the wellspring of Western Civilization under Greeks; was trampled down by Romans and Byzantines; became the glory of Europe again under Arabs and Normans, igniting the Renaissance; and was then left to rot by the Spanish. We’ll conclude with the arrival of Garibaldi in the west, Patton in the south, and Francis Ford Coppola in the east (not all at the same time). Sicily is an unexpectedly subtle, fascinating, and wounded place that is central to our Western story. 

    Instructor: Douglas Kenning, a popular instructor for lifelong learning programs, received a PhD from the University of  Edinburgh, Scotland, and has lived as a university assistant professor in Tunisia, Japan, Italy, and the USA.  He has been a biologist, actor, army officer, Manhattan taxi driver, academic administrator, and writer of books, articles, and stage plays.  He lives half the year in the Bay Area, giving lectures on subjects related to Mediterranean histories and cultures, and half the year in Siracusa, Sicily, where he runs a non-profit, Sicily Tour, giving tours and arranging cultural exchanges.  He says the speed of this history is 799.25 years per hour!

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Rooms B and C 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
"Economy and Security in the 21st Century" with Madeleine Albright
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    How can America retain its leadership role amidst rapid globalization? Is America truly the indispensable nation? How do domestic politics influence foreign policy?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
#TWEET: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     Contemporary music technology, 16th century madrigals, and everything in between. The songs of birds serve as a starting place for an evening full of innovation from one of the original sources of musical inspiration. Combined with live audience feedback and interactive compositions, it’s a night where you'll want to make sure your smartphone is anything but off.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity
Alumni Association Board of Directors Meeting
Amusing, Enlightening Tales
  • Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    ASG presents Dr. Jeff Zorn

    Long-serving English faculty member
    Dr. Jeff Zorn will speak on:
    "My Life and Times as a Student and Teacher"


    Cost: Free
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
Amyloid-beta & Alzheimer's Disease: Using Physics to Reveal a Toxic Protein's Elusive Structure
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Alzheimer's Disease is characterized by large toxic fibrils and plaques in the brain. Amyloid-beta, a small, naturally occurring protein, is the major component of these fibrils and plaques. In order to understand the formation of the toxic forms of the protein, we would like to have a picture of Amyloid-beta in the free state, when not part of these fibrils or smaller aggregates. This is particularly difficult because unlike most proteins, which adopt a single, well-folded structure, Amyloid-beta is very flexible and constantly changes shape. However, we can use a combination of physics based computer simulations and biological NMR spectroscopy to understand Amyloid-beta structure and how this structure may influence toxicity and disease. 

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Chris Weber at 408-554-7869 (voice) or 1-800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.


    Location: Daly Science Center
         Daly Science 206
An Evening with Andy Ackerman
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Hear Andy Ackerman ’78 in conversation about directing and producing some of TV’s funniest and most beloved series, including Seinfeld, The New Adventures of Old Christine, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
Armchair Traveler Visits West Africa Today: Contemporary Village Life in Burkina Faso
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Many of our conceptions of Africa are misconceptions. We seldom see what life is like on a day-to-day basis. The Western media routinely offers negative images of conflict, famine and disease. At the other extreme we encounter images of exotic tribal cultures and safari adventures. My experience living in West Africa has given me a different perspective. For nearly a decade, I have spent two months each year in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water, in the country of Burkina Faso. I am photographing the activities of daily life. The Friday Night series documents the weekly dance at a small outdoor club called Le Cotonnier, where villagers dance all night under the stars on a small patch of concrete. The Sur La Route series features portraits of farmers as they travel home at twilight along a dirt path that passes by the house where I live. I also photograph villagers at work in the local brick quarry, in the gold mines, in their fields and in the market.  Photographing as a member of the community, I strive to portray the strength and dignity that I see in my friends and neighbors, capturing the beauty and complexity of a simple village. In this class, I will share my experiences and images of life in Bereba and present a unique perspective on West Africa.

    Instructor: David Pace has been teaching photography in the San Francisco Bay Area for more than 20 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, Pace spent ten weeks each fall in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. Pace received the 2011 Work-In-Process Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and Daylight Magazine.  His work was included in the 2012 biennial Anthology at the Southeast Museum of Photography. He has had solo exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA; Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR; 511 Gallery in New York City; Corden/Potts Gallery in San Francisco; the Camerawork Gallery in Portland, OR; andthe World Affairs Council in San Francisco. Pace’s photographs of rural Africa have appeared in LensCulture, aCurator.com, Slate, Daylight Magazine, Lenscratch, Photo District News (PDN), The Atlantic Cities, View (Germany). His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and in the Art Photo Index (API).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 12, 19

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Thursday, Feb 19, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Many of our conceptions of Africa are misconceptions. We seldom see what life is like on a day-to-day basis. The Western media routinely offers negative images of conflict, famine and disease. At the other extreme we encounter images of exotic tribal cultures and safari adventures. My experience living in West Africa has given me a different perspective. For nearly a decade, I have spent two months each year in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water, in the country of Burkina Faso. I am photographing the activities of daily life. The Friday Night series documents the weekly dance at a small outdoor club called Le Cotonnier, where villagers dance all night under the stars on a small patch of concrete. The Sur La Route series features portraits of farmers as they travel home at twilight along a dirt path that passes by the house where I live. I also photograph villagers at work in the local brick quarry, in the gold mines, in their fields and in the market.  Photographing as a member of the community, I strive to portray the strength and dignity that I see in my friends and neighbors, capturing the beauty and complexity of a simple village. In this class, I will share my experiences and images of life in Bereba and present a unique perspective on West Africa.

    Instructor: David Pace has been teaching photography in the San Francisco Bay Area for more than 20 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, Pace spent ten weeks each fall in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. Pace received the 2011 Work-In-Process Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and Daylight Magazine.  His work was included in the 2012 biennial Anthology at the Southeast Museum of Photography. He has had solo exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA; Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR; 511 Gallery in New York City; Corden/Potts Gallery in San Francisco; the Camerawork Gallery in Portland, OR; andthe World Affairs Council in San Francisco. Pace’s photographs of rural Africa have appeared in LensCulture, aCurator.com, Slate, Daylight Magazine, Lenscratch, Photo District News (PDN), The Atlantic Cities, View (Germany). His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and in the Art Photo Index (API).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 12, 19

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Ash Wednesday Tri-School Liturgy
Bad Girls of the Bible
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Feb 2, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
Beautiful Gardens: Optional Field Trip
  • Saturday, Mar 21, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here 

    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Location: Tentative Filoli Garden   

    Cost: 25.00
Beautiful Gardens: Then and Now
  • Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: SPLIT ROOMS
                    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (February 26)
                    Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A ( March 5, 12) 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Thursday, Mar 5, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: SPLIT ROOMS
                    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (February 26)
                    Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A ( March 5, 12) 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: SPLIT ROOMS
                    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (February 26)
                    Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A ( March 5, 12) 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
Book of the Quarter: We Need New Names
  • Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

    Join the University Library in welcoming author NoViolet Bulaway, author of We Need New Names. Bulawayo will read excerpts from and discuss her book as well as take questions from faculty, staff and students.

    From the book jacket:

    A remarkable literary debut -- shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize! The unflinching and powerful story of a young girl's journey out of Zimbabwe and to America.

    Darling is only ten years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo's belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad.

    But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America's famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few. NoViolet Bulawayo's debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her-from Junot Diaz to Zadie Smith to J.M. Coetzee-while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.”

    All SCU students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend.

    This event is co-sponsored with Silicon Valley Reads, an annual community program engaging the public in reading, thinking and discussion.

     


    Location: Learning Commons and Library, St. Clare Room
Bronco Idol
  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Calling All Students ... What would you do with $500? There's only one way to find out!

    Join ASG and the Alumni Association during Bronco Week 2015 to showcase your talent by performing the SCU Fight Song and taking a crack at the $500 grand prize! Second and third place prizes also available.

    Alumni ... come cheer on the students as they perform! You won't want to miss this great new tradition.

    RSVP Today!


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Benson Center, The Bronco
Broncos Go Social: Bon Appétite - A French Culinary Experience
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM

    Learn the ins and outs of preparring the perfect French themed dinner! Alumni and guests will enjoy a hands-on cooking experience led by professionally trained chefs. After working in small groups to prepare a variety of appetizers, main courses, and dessert, guests will enjoy the fruits of their labor amongs fellow alumni and friends. Wine will also be paired with the meal.

    RSVP Today!


    Cost: $40
    Location:
         International Culinary Center
Broncos Read Unveiling Ceremony
  • Thursday, Apr 16, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

     Please join us as we unveil the 2015 Broncos Read honorees. Light refreshments will be served. Please direct any ADA/504 accomodation requests to Kelly De Leon-Lopez 408-554-5031.


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Lower Level
Buck Bannan Awards
Campus Tour - Friday
Campus Tour - Saturday
Careers for the Common Good Industry Panel
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    A panel of alums and other professionals working in industries including social entrepreneurship, healthcare, corporate social responsibility, nonprofits and more will share their reflections and insights on their work and industry.  The panel will be followed by an informal networking hour.


    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Chapter Workshop
Chicano Latino: Santa Clara vs. Gonzaga
  • Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 from 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Join the Chicano Latino Alumni Chapter as we cheer on the Broncos against archrival and nationally ranked Gonzaga! We were able to secure tickets to this sure sellout so SCU alumni, family, and friends can attend the game.

    If you'd like the support the SCU Pep Band at their annual fundraiser and enjoy some great BBQ and drinks before the game, click here for more information. The BBQ will take place at the Donohoe Alumni house.

    RSVP Today!


    Cost: $10
    Location: Leavey Center
Class of 1950 Reunion Lunch
Class of 1955 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1960 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1965 Golden Anniversary Dinner
Class of 1965 Kickoff Dinner
Class of 1970 Reunion Party
Class of 1975 Reunion Party
Class of 1980 Reunion Party
Class of 1985 Reunion Party
Class of 1990 Reunion Party
Class of 1995 Reunion Party
Class of 2000 Reunion Party
Class of 2005 Reunion Party
Class of 2010 Reunion Party
Combined Choral Concert
Commencement Recital
CPSY X231:Prenatal and Postpartum Mood Disorders
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    CPSY X231:Prenatal and Postpartum Mood Disorders
    Saturday, February 28, 9AM-5PM
    Rm. 136, $145
     

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
    Up to 20% of women experience mood disorders during pregnancy and the postpartum period; many are undiagnosed and untreated.  The consequences of untreated maternal illness can include low birth weight and preterm labor, chronic depression and relapse, relationship discord, cognitive and developmental delays in the infant, childhood modd disturbance, and potentially suicide and infanticide.
     
    We will cover risk factors and prenatal and postpartum screening.  We will learn to differentiate between depression/anxiety, panic, OCD, PTSD, and psychosis as seen in pregnancy and postpartum period. Treatment modalities and specific techniques will be discussed as they relate to perinatal mood disorders, specifically: Interpersonal therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and group therapy. Psychopharmacological treatment, in particular during pregnancy and nursing, will be reviewed. You will learn about resources available for pregnant and postpartum women and families. 
     
     
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Pec Indman, Ed.D., MFT has worked in the field of perinatal mood disorders for the past seventeen years. Dr. Indman has her Ed.D. from USF, and a M.A. in health psychology from Santa Clara University. Additionally, she trained as a family practice physician's assistant, and worked in family practice, women's health and health promotion. As Director of Women’s Health for Regroup Therapy, she’s involved with web based psychotherapy 
    and support groups. She is involved with several international organizations dedicated to perinatal mental health, and has been an invited participant on several federal grants on perinatal mood disorders. Dr. Indamn is co-author 
    of the book Beyond the Blues, Understanding and Treating Prenatal and Postpartum Depression & Anxiety. (Moodswings Press: 2010) 

     


    Cost: $145
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 136
CPSY x274 Level 1- Gottman Couples Therapy: Bridging the Couples Chasm, A New Research-Based Approach
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Mar 7, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x274 Level 1- Gottman Couples Therapy

    DATE: March 6th & 7th 

    TIME: 9-4:30PM (lunch provided) Both days

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    WORKSHOP FEE: $360

    Credit:12 CEUs

    **PLEASE NOTE** Additional Costs for this Course: 300-page Gottman Clinical Manual: $85
    The price of this mandatory manual is not included in the course registration price; students will be required to buy one of these manuals with cash or check or credit card the day of the course. Please contact us if you have any questions.

    Register for WInter »

     

     

     

     

    Course Objectives:

    • Summarize the research on prediction of future relationship stability
    • Describe the seven levels of the Sound Relationship House theory
    • Conduct a couple's therapy assessment using elements of the couple's narrative, the Oral History Interview, written questionnaires, observations of conflict, and individual interviews.
    • Describe two interventions for each: to help strengthen a couple's management of conflict, to enhance a couple's frienship system, and to explore a couple's system of shared meaning.

    Course Description:

           When couples enter the therapy office, they sting with pain and despair. They look to the clinician to referee chronic conflicts, fix their partners, and rebuild burned bridges. Now, based on Dr. John Gottman's 40 years of compelling research with over 3,000 couples, there's a practical and highly effective approach to guiding these couples across the chasm that divides them. In this workshop, Dr. Navarra provides clinicians with proven, research-based roadmap for helping couples to compassionately manage their conflicts, deepen their friendship and intimacy, and share their life purpose and dreams.  

           This inspirational two-day workshop focuses on 1) understanding couples' struggles using new research-based assessments and effective interventions,  2) empirically supported strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict, 3) skills that empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues by uncovering their underlying dreams, history, and values, 4) Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts and 5) techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse
     
            You’ll receive a 300-page Clinical Manual featuring new relationship assessment questionnaires and clinical interventions that you’ll be able to use immediately with your clients.

           Clinicians who take this workshop will be equipped with new methods and tools to help couples break the cycle of criticism, defensiveness, contempt and stonewalling. Through demonstrations and films from the clinical office, you'll see how to apply the research-based principles and interventions of Gottman Method Couples Therapy to strengthen the Friendship System - the building block for intimacy, passion, and good sex; the Conflict System - the basis for helping couples manage solvable problems and understand and manage irresolvable differences and the Shared Meaning System - the existential foundation of the relationship that helps couples create shared purpose in building a life together.
     

           Instructor:

    Bob Navarra, Psy.D., M.F.T., trained with Drs. John and Julie Gottman and is Certified by the Gottman Institute to teach Level 1; Level II: Assessment, Intervention, and Comorbidities; and the Art & Science of Love: A Weekend Workshop for Couples. Dr. Navarra and Dr. Gottman recently co-authored a chapter titled Gottman Method Therapy: From Theory to Practice, in Case Studies in Couple Therapy: Theory-Based Approaches (2011).  He has also written extensively and published in the areas of alcoholism and drug addiction co-Morbidity. Dr. Navarra is a Research Scientist at the Gottman Relationship Research Institute and Research Associate at Mental Research Institute, where he co-founded the Center for Couples. He has presented his original research at conferences for AAMFT, CAMFT, and the Gottman Institute.

    This is a two day event - 11/14/14 - 9am-4:30pm & 11/15/14 - 9am-4:30pm


    Cost: 360 (+ $85 day of course)
    Location: Loyola Hall
CPSY x855: Aging and Relationships
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Feb 7, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 1:15 PM
    CPSY x855 – Aging and Relationships
    TWO DAY WORKSHOP: Friday, February 6, 9AM-4:30PM and Saturday, February 7, 9AM – 1:15PM
    Rm. 160, $288
     
    *This course is approved for 10 hours of CE credit toward the BBS requirement.

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    As the population grays, we will see more and more people in the 60 plus age group. Is there anything unique about this population? Are there problems and issues specific to aging that are within the expertise of the counselor?
     
    Aging can be considered a continuum. On one end are the seriously distressed. Here clients may be concerned about memory gaps, disorientation, and general loss of function. This may include those who are dementing, depressed, or severely anxious. The counselor needs to be aware of the signs and symptoms of these disorders as well as the treatment opportunities.
     
    On the other end of the continuum are those who have been consciously successful at aging. Here are people who seem to be alive and present. They enjoy all aspects of their lives and continue to grow and make new memories. What are the values, attitudes, and behaviors that contribute to this? These qualities are teachable and the counseling format may be the most appropriate context to teach them.
     
     
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Hayes has had a dual career as a therapist and u teacher since 1966. After Spending three years working in State hospitals and five and one half years working for Santa Clara County Mental Health, he began his private practice. He continues his practice in Saratoga, working with individuals, couples and seniors.
     
    He has taught at a number of colleges and universities including San Jose State and, for thirty five years, at Santa Clara University. Even though he taught courses in Psychopathology and Clinical Assessment, his main interest has been Health Psychology.
     
    He spent twenty five years focusing on chronic illness and worked closely with the Multiple Sclerosis Society. He was able to bring this interest to Santa Clara University by starting the Master’s program in Health Psychology. From there it was an easy transition to his interest in Aging as a component of Health Psychology.
     
    For ten years now Dr. Hayes has led courses on Aging for the Center for Professional Development as well as giving talks and seminars at various hospitals in the area.
     
    From his beginnings as a Health Psychologist, Dr. Hayes has been interested in how individuals form the experience of themselves. Bodies evolve and change. Aging certainly involves physical and psychological change. Yet individuals continue to create and maintain an identity, often transforming these changes into consciousness and growth.
     
     

     


    Cost: $288
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x932: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
  • Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x932– Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
    This course is available as a 4 hour or 6 hour course.

    Saturday, March 14, 9-1:15PM, Rm. 160, $96
    OR
    Saturday, March 14, 9-4:30PM, Rm. 160, $168

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    Tired of listening to someone spew information at you all day? This day-long interactive workshop will provide you with the information you need, but will also give you a chance to sharpen your own ethical decision-making skills at the same time. We will discuss issues of informed consent, confidentiality, reporting laws, client rights and counselor responsibilities, etc. The format will include case studies, brief presentations, discussion, and didactic exercises designed to help you explore your own values and ethical framework. This workshop is tailed specifically for MFT’s.
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO
     
    A former Jesuit, Donald St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministries and Counseling Psychology.
    St. Louis completed his D.Min. from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1986. He is the Founder and Director of The California Institute for Sexual Recovery in San Francisco and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in San Francisco and Santa Clara. A former Jesuit, St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology and Pastoral Ministries.

     

     

    Cost: $96/$168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x932: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
  • Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x932– Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
    This course is available as a 4 hour or 6 hour course.

    Saturday, March 14, 9-1PM, Rm. 160, $96
    ** 4 Continuing Education Hours **
    OR
    Saturday, March 14, 9-4PM, Rm. 160, $168
    ** 6 Continuing Education Hours **

    Register Here!

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    Tired of listening to someone spew information at you all day? This day-long interactive workshop will provide you with the information you need, but will also give you a chance to sharpen your own ethical decision-making skills at the same time. We will discuss issues of informed consent, confidentiality, reporting laws, client rights and counselor responsibilities, etc. The format will include case studies, brief presentations, discussion, and didactic exercises designed to help you explore your own values and ethical framework. This workshop is tailed specifically for MFT’s.
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO
     
    A former Jesuit, Donald St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministries and Counseling Psychology.
    St. Louis completed his D.Min. from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1986. He is the Founder and Director of The California Institute for Sexual Recovery in San Francisco and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in San Francisco and Santa Clara. A former Jesuit, St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology and Pastoral Ministries.

     

     

    Cost: $96/$168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Deadline for late registration/full refund/oral defense
Democracy in Crisis: Europe and the EU
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Feb 2, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
Difficult Dialogue: Being LGBTA and Catholic
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Benson 21
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
Difficult Dialogue: Exploring Transgender & Genderqueer
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Kennedy Commons
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Kennedy Mall, Commons at Kennedy Mall
Difficult Dialogue: Managing Mental Illness
  • Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Kennedy Commons
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Kennedy Mall, Commons at Kennedy Mall
Difficult Dialogue: Navigating New Immigration Laws with Educators for Fair Consideration
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Benson 21
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
Difficult Dialogue: Sexual Assault on College Campuses
  • Thursday, Feb 19, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Kennedy Commons
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Kennedy Mall, Commons at Kennedy Mall
Difficult Dialogue: YOLO-Party Culture @ SCU
  • Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Benson 21
    6:00 - 8:00 PM

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. All are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
Distinguished Speaker: Kaiser Permanente and the Future of Medicine in America
  • Saturday, Jan 31, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here 

    There are many who feel that Kaiser Permanente is the model for the future of medicine in the United States.  As the Physician in Chief of the Kaiser hospital in Santa Clara, which serves more than 300,000 members in Santa Clara County, Dr. Susan Smarr will address the current status of its operation and share her vision on how they will deal with the issues and challenges of the future.

    Instructor: Dr. Susan Smarr is originally from Savannah, Georgia, and graduated from Duke University with a BS in Botany.  After earning her medical degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, she went on to complete her residency in obstetrics and gynecology there.  She joined Kaiser Permanente in 1987.  Prior to being named the physician-in-chief at its Santa Clara Medical Center, Dr. Smarr held a variety of leadership positions, including chief of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, as well as chief of quality for the medical center.  She is involved in teaching both medical students and residents and is on the teaching faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    New Location: Sobrato Residence Hall A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 25.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2015
East Bay Warriors Game
  • Wednesday, Mar 18, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Come watch as the Warriors take on the Atlanta Hawks, two playoff teams from the year before. We will also be courtside for the pre-game shoot around warm ups.

     

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 Per Person
    Location:
         Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way Oakland, CA 94621
Easter Bunny Brunch
Easter: Library Closed
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Thursday, February 12 *Must register by February 4th

    Time: 9AM-1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    Workshop Fee: $55

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 137
EDUC x992 SHRM-CP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, May 16, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x992 SHRM-CP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): May 7, 8, & 9 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): May 14 & 15 from 6PM - 9PM, May 16 from 8AM - 1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 135(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Joan Torne has been in the Human Resources field for more than 12 years. She is currently the Associate Director of Human Resources at Santa Clara University. She received her Bachelor’s degree in International Business at the University of San Francisco, her Master’s degree in Sociology at San Jose State University and her doctoral degree in Organization and Leadership from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests are leadership in higher education, Asian Pacific American leaders in higher education, diversity in higher education, strategic planning in higher education, bureaucratic organizations, emotions at work, work and family, women at work, social inequalities, and human resources management. She also holds a Professional Human Resources Certificate (PHR) since 2007. Dr. Torne has taught Human Resources courses as a lecturer and a mentor at the Silicon Valley School of Management at San Jose State University. She is committed in upholding personal and organizational continuous improvement and an advocate for equal access to higher education.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 135
EDUC x992 SHRM-CP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, Jun 13, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x992 SHRM-CP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): June 4, 5, & 6 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): June 11 & 12 from 6PM - 9PM, June 13 from 8AM - 1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 135(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Joan Torne has been in the Human Resources field for more than 12 years. She is currently the Associate Director of Human Resources at Santa Clara University. She received her Bachelor’s degree in International Business at the University of San Francisco, her Master’s degree in Sociology at San Jose State University and her doctoral degree in Organization and Leadership from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests are leadership in higher education, Asian Pacific American leaders in higher education, diversity in higher education, strategic planning in higher education, bureaucratic organizations, emotions at work, work and family, women at work, social inequalities, and human resources management. She also holds a Professional Human Resources Certificate (PHR) since 2007. Dr. Torne has taught Human Resources courses as a lecturer and a mentor at the Silicon Valley School of Management at San Jose State University. She is committed in upholding personal and organizational continuous improvement and an advocate for equal access to higher education.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 135
EDUC x993 SHRM-SCP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, Apr 2, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, Apr 11, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x993 SHRM-SCP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): April 2, 3, & 4 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): April 9 & 10 from 6PM - 9PM, April 11 from 8AM - 1PM

    19th February is the last day to register for this class

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 135(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Maria Elena De Guevara is the owner of HR Works!, a consulting firm specializing in human resources and executive coaching. Before resuming her consulting firm, Maria Elena was the AVP of HR for two Bay Area universities. Maria Elena's 32 year career includes higher education, government and manufacturing. Maria Elena has a successful history of bringing technology and strategic thinking to the HR function. Under her leadership, HR Departments have flourished as strategic business partners and have received numerous awards recognizing their innovation and success. Maria Elena has facilitated numerous workshops and has presented at several conferences both in the United States and Mexico. Additionally, Maria Elena shares her passion for HR with others by teaching numerous human resource courses. She is currently MBA faculty with Santa Barbara Business College. Maria Elena De Guevara received her Master’s Degree in Human Resource and Organizational Development from the University of San Francisco and her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Santa Clara. Additionally, she holds certifications in Human Resources, Emotional Intelligence, Executive Coaching, and Diversity. Maria Elena was the past President for the Northern California Chapter of IPMA-HR, Past-President of the Western Region IPMA-HR, Past Western Region CUPA-HR Board and Past Vice President of San Jose Day Nursery Board.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 135
EDUC x993 SHRM-SCP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, May 16, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x993 SHRM-SCP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): May 7, 8, & 9 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): May 14 & 15 from 6PM - 9PM, May 16 from 8AM - 1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 134(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Maria Elena De Guevara is the owner of HR Works!, a consulting firm specializing in human resources and executive coaching. Before resuming her consulting firm, Maria Elena was the AVP of HR for two Bay Area universities. Maria Elena's 32 year career includes higher education, government and manufacturing. Maria Elena has a successful history of bringing technology and strategic thinking to the HR function. Under her leadership, HR Departments have flourished as strategic business partners and have received numerous awards recognizing their innovation and success. Maria Elena has facilitated numerous workshops and has presented at several conferences both in the United States and Mexico. Additionally, Maria Elena shares her passion for HR with others by teaching numerous human resource courses. She is currently MBA faculty with Santa Barbara Business College. Maria Elena De Guevara received her Master’s Degree in Human Resource and Organizational Development from the University of San Francisco and her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Santa Clara. Additionally, she holds certifications in Human Resources, Emotional Intelligence, Executive Coaching, and Diversity. Maria Elena was the past President for the Northern California Chapter of IPMA-HR, Past-President of the Western Region IPMA-HR, Past Western Region CUPA-HR Board and Past Vice President of San Jose Day Nursery Board.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 134
Faculty Chamber Music
Family Weekend
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 to Saturday, Feb 21, 2015

     Santa Clara parents are important members of the SCU community. We thank each family for their support and partnership with all students through their journey here at Santa Clara University.

    We want to extend a special invitation to join us on campus for the 2015 Family Weekend. These events provide you with a great opportunity to learn more about the University and spend some quality time in a fun, social environment with your SCU student.

Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers
Film Odyssey: Working Stiffs - Films about People Who Labor
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 21, 28 and February 4, 11

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 21, 28 and February 4, 11

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 21, 28 and February 4, 11

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
Freedom & Slavery - Moving Beyond Moral Judgment
French Table/LaTable française
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
  • Monday, Feb 2, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
  • Monday, Feb 23, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
  • Monday, Mar 2, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
  • Monday, Mar 9, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 12 noon till 1 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de midi à 13h sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A lundi!  et bonne année!

     


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Patio (if there is inclement weather, Benson Inside)
Freshman/Sophomore Job Fair
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs & internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU freshmen & sophomores of all majors.  

    Must show SCU ID.  


    Location: Locatelli Center
From the Supreme Court to Legislated Death: Current U.S. Legal Issues Series
  • Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 
    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 
    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 
    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 
    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 
    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
Fusion: Santa Clara University Choirs and Orchestra
  • Friday, Jun 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The final concert of the year is a collaboration between the Santa Clara University choirs and orchestras. The evening’s program is eclectic and features selections from Mozart’sVespers.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Genentech Information Session
General Registration for Spring Semester 2015
Geology of the National Parks of the West
  • Friday, Jan 30, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 30 and February 6, 13 (Note:  this is a date change not listed in the in printed catalog)

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Learning Common, Library Viewing & Taping Room A (Jan 16, 30, Feb 6)

    Location: Bannan Hall 139 (Feb 13) 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 30 and February 6, 13 (Note:  this is a date change not listed in the in printed catalog)

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Learning Common, Library Viewing & Taping Room A (Jan 16, 30, Feb 6)

    Location: Bannan Hall 139 (Feb 13) 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Friday, Feb 13, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 30 and February 6, 13 (Note:  this is a date change not listed in the in printed catalog)

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Learning Common, Library Viewing & Taping Room A (Jan 16, 30, Feb 6)

    Location: Bannan Hall 139 (Feb 13) 


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Gianera Society Lunch
Good Friday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
GRADUATION PICNIC 2015
Homecoming Picnic
Ignatian Leadership Symposium
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Sponsored by the Ignatian Center, three notable Santa Clara University alumnae, who have all provided significant leadership around issues of justice, faith, and the intellectual life, will reflect on the foundations of and challenges within their vocational commitments and leadership.

    For more information and to RSVP

Ignatian Leadership Symposium
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Fee: $10 per event ($25 for full smposium)
    Lunch included with registration

    Three notable Santa Clara University alumnae, who have all provided significant leadership around issues of justice, faith, and the intellectual life, will reflect on the foundations of and challenges within their vocational commitments and leadership.

    Co-sponsored by Alumni Relations, the President's Office, and the Center for Student Leadership (Family Weekend)

    8:30–9:00 a.m. Registration Open; Continental Breakfast Available

    9:00–9:15 a.m. Welcome and Introduction
    Michael Engh, S.J., President, Santa Clara University

    Leadership and Justice
    Zoe LofgrenSCU (J.D.) '75, U.S. Representative, California, 19th Congressional District
    February 21, 2015 | 9:15-10:30 AM
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    Conversants: Cynthia Mertens, Professor, Santa Clara Law and Elsa Chen, Associate Professor, Political Science Department, Santa Clara University

    Contingent upon 2015 Congressional Calendar

    Zoe Lofgren serves as U.S. Representative, California from the 19th Congressional District. She was born in San Mateo, California and attended public schools (K-12) in Palo Alto, California.  Lofgren received her B.A. in Political Science from Stanford University and her J.D., cum laude, from Santa Clara School of Law. Earlier in her career, Lofgren served as Staff Assistant to her predecessor, Congressman Don Edwards, 1970-1978, with whom she Worked on impeachment proceedings for President Nixon, the Equal Rights Amendment, and creation of the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in the South San Francisco Bay. Lofgren practiced immigration law as a partner in the firm of Webber & Lofgren from 1978-1980, taught immigration law at Santa Clara School of Law from 1977-1980, and served on Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, 1981-1994.  She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1994 as the only freshman Democrat from west of the Rocky Mountains.  Lofgren currently serves on the House Judiciary Committee as the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security and member of the Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet.  She also serves on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, and the Committee on House Administration. Lofgren serves as Chair of the 38 Member California Democratic Congressional Delegation.  She is married to John Marshall Collins and together they have two children, Sheila and John Collins.


    Leadership and Faith
    Sharon KuglerSCU '81, University Chaplain, Yale University
    February 21, 2015 | 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.p
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    Conversants: Tom Massaro, S.J., Dean, Jesuit School of Theology, Santa Clara University and María de la Luz (Lulu) Santana, SCU (M.A.) ’97, Director of Campus Ministry, Santa Clara University

    Sharon M.K. Kugler is seventh University Chaplain to Yale University. She came to New Haven from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore where she had served as the University Chaplain since 1993.  Kugler has over two decades of experience in ministry in higher education, interfaith collaboration, pastoral and social ministry. Her main focus at Yale is to further cultivate a chaplaincy for students, faculty and staff which defines itself by serving the needs of the richly diverse religious and spiritual traditions on campus allowing for deeper dialogue, increased accessibility, personal growth, creative educational opportunities and pastoral leadership.  Together with the Associate Chaplains, the Chaplain’s Office staff and the members of Yale Religious Ministry she is cultivating an inclusive sense of community within a religiously plural population. Kugler is the past president of both the National Association of College and University Chaplains (NACUC) and the Association of College and University Religious Affairs (ACURA). She received her Masters degree from Georgetown University and is a member of the Theta Alpha Kappa National Honor Society for Religious Studies and Theology. Her masters thesis, "The Limits and Possibilities of Building a Religiously Plural Community" was used by the United States Department of Defense Office of the Chief of Chaplains as a training tool for new chaplains in the military.  She completed her undergraduate education at Santa Clara University. Kugler is Roman Catholic and originates from northern California. She is married and has two daughters.

    Leadership and the Intellectual Life
    Janet NapolitanoSCU '79, President, University of California System
    February 21, 2015 | 1:30-2:45 p.m.
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    Conversants: Lisa Kloppenberg, Dean and Professor of Law, Santa Clara University and Dennis Jacobs, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Santa Clara University

    Janet Napolitano is the 20th president of the University of California, leading a university system with 10 campuses, five medical centers, three affiliated national laboratories, and a statewide agriculture and natural resources program.  Napolitano is a distinguished public servant with a record of leading large, complex organizations at the federal and state levels. She served as Secretary of Homeland Security from 2009-13, as Governor of Arizona from 2003-09, as Attorney General of Arizona from 1998-2003, and as U.S. Attorney for the District of Arizona from 1993-97. Before that, she practiced at the law firm of Lewis & Roca in Phoenix, where she became a partner in 1989. She began her career in 1983 as a clerk for Judge Mary M. Schroeder of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. As Governor of Arizona, Napolitano focused on education, from pre-kindergarten through public higher education. She was the first woman to chair the National Governors Association, and was named one of the nation’s top five governors by Time magazine.  Napolitano earned a B.S. degree (summa cum laude in Political Science) in 1979 from Santa Clara University, where she was Phi Beta Kappa, a Truman Scholar and the university’s first female valedictorian. She received her law degree in 1983 from the University of Virginia School of Law. Napolitano holds honorary degrees from several universities and colleges, including Emory University. Pomona College, and Northeastern University. In 2010, she was awarded the prestigious Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal (Law), the University of Virginia’s highest external honor.

    2:45 PM-3:00 p.m. Closing
    Mick McCarthy, S.J., Executive Director, Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, Santa Clara University


    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Independence Day: Administrative holiday/Library Closed
Internships Panel & Networking Event
Intersession 2015 Ends
ISS Employment Workshop: CPT/OPT Workshop
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

     Are you interested in doing an internsip while in school or working in the U.S. after graduation? If you are, come to a CPT/OPT Workshop to learn everything you need to know about Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT). ISS will present information to help guide you through the process and will answer any questions you may have concerning employment.  Please register here.

     


    Location:
         Benson Center, Parlors BC
ISS Employment Workshop: CPT/OPT Workshop
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

     Are you interested in doing an internsip while in school or working in the U.S. after graduation? If you are, come to a CPT/OPT Workshop to learn everything you need to know about Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT). ISS will present information to help guide you through the process and will answer any questions you may have concerning employment.  Please register here.

     


    Location:
         Benson Center, Parlors BC
ISS Employment Workshop: CPT/OPT Workshop
  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

     Are you interested in doing an internsip while in school or working in the U.S. after graduation? If you are, come to a CPT/OPT Workshop to learn everything you need to know about Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT). ISS will present information to help guide you through the process and will answer any questions you may have concerning employment.  Please register here.

     


    Location:
         Benson Center, Parlors BC
ISS Employment Workshop: CPT/OPT Workshop
  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

     Are you interested in doing an internsip while in school or working in the U.S. after graduation? If you are, come to a CPT/OPT Workshop to learn everything you need to know about Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT). ISS will present information to help guide you through the process and will answer any questions you may have concerning employment.  Please register here.

     


    Location:
         Benson Center, Parlors BC
ISS Employment Workshop: CPT/OPT Workshop
  • Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015 from 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

     Are you interested in doing an internsip while in school or working in the U.S. after graduation? If you are, come to a CPT/OPT Workshop to learn everything you need to know about Curricular Practical Training (CPT) and Optional Practical Training (OPT). ISS will present information to help guide you through the process and will answer any questions you may have concerning employment.  Please register here.


    Location:
         NEW LOCATION: Alumni Science Hall, Room 120
ISS: H4-F1 Workshop
ISS: H4-F1 Workshop
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Thursday, Feb 19, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Monday, Feb 23, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Monday, Mar 9, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

  • Tuesday, Mar 17, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Once you have completed the iStart Strong assessment, this lab will help you learn how to read and interpret your results as well as identify resources and next steps.  

    Registration required.  Contact the Career Center for more information.  

Jazz Band/Combo Concert
  • Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band and Combo present concerts throughout the academic year. These exciting programs feature music in the American jazz tradition from the bright energy of the Big Band era all the way forward to the jazz music of today. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jesuit Restoration Lecture by Ursula King
JST - Theology in the City in Los Angeles
  • Sunday, Feb 15, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Theology in the City: Los Angeles

    February 15, 2015
    Wilshire Country Club in Los Angeles, California
    12:00 pm Mass | 1:00 pm Lecture | 2:00 pm Reception
    "Pope Francis, The Synod on the Family and the Many Winds of Change"
    Allan Figueroa Deck, S.J. and Thomas Massaro, S.J.
     
    RSVP by Feb. 9

    Cost: No Cost
JST - Theology in the City in New York
  • Wednesday, Apr 15, 2015 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    Theology in the City: New York

    "Pope Francis, The Synod on the Family and Change in the Church"
    James Martin, S.J. and Thomas Massaro, S.J.

    Harvard Club of New York City, New York
    6:30 pm Lecture | 7:30 pm Reception

     


    Cost: No Cost
JST Admissions Visit: Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
  • Friday, Mar 13, 2015 to Sunday, Mar 15, 2015

    JST Admissions at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress:

    March 13-15, 2015
    Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
    Exhibit Hall
    Anaheim Convention Center
    Anaheim, California

    Email or call for an appointment to meet wtih us while we are in Anaheim!


    Location:
         Anaheim Convention Center
JST Baccalaureate Liturgy
JST Commencement Ceremony
JST Community Mass and Soup Supper
  • Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Mar 17, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Apr 7, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
Language, Thought, Culture: A Reanalysis
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
Late Registration Spring Semester 2015
Lenten Afternoon of Reflection
  • Sunday, Mar 15, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM

    Lent is a season of spiritual renewal and recommitment, we invite you to join Fr. Jack Treacy, S.J. and Prof. Sally Vance-Trembath for an afternoon of prayer and reflection. A light lunch will be served.

    RSVP


    Cost: $25
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
LinkedIn Drop-In Lab
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo of key LinkedIn features and strategies (starting at 2pm) and spend time working on your profile and networking and asking questions as you work.  


    Location:
         Learning Commons 205
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo of key LinkedIn features and strategies (starting at 2pm) and spend time working on your profile and networking and asking questions as you work.  


    Location:
         Learning Commons 205
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo of key LinkedIn features and strategies (starting at 2pm) and spend time working on your profile and networking and asking questions as you work.  


    Location:
         Learning Commons 205
Literary Cuisine: A Tribute to Maya Angelou
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

    The University Library invites you to join us at a luncheon to celebrate the life and work of Maya Angleou, the world renowned author, poet, and civil rights activist. A mouth-watering menu has been selected from recipes in Maya Angelou's book, Hallelujah! The Welcome Table: A Lifetime of Memories with Recipes.

    This event features a line-up of guests from across campus. Aldo Billingslea, the Associate Provost for Diversity and Inclusion as well as a professor in the Theatre and Dance Department, will recite some of Maya Angelou's poems, along with student Regina Fields. Additionally, professor Allia Ida Griffin of the English Department will provide a short overview of Maya Angelou’s life and work.

    Bon Appétit will cater the event for $12 per person. Please click here to register and pay for this event. Two lucky guests will win 2 tickets to the next Literary Cuisine event or a copy of the book.

    All proceeds from this event will be donated to Friends of African Village Libraries (FAVL), an organization founded by SCU professors Michael Kevane and Leslie Gray.  

    In compliance with the ADA/504 please direct your accommodation requests to: Kelly De Leon-Lopez, University Library at 408-554-5031, 72 hours prior to February 9, 2015. 

     

     

     

    Cost: $12
    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Longevity and the Aging Brain
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     Dr. Dena Dubal is a neurologist and neuroscientist passionate about biomedical discoveries to improve human health. Dr. Dubal received her MD and PhD degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her graduate research focused on effects of hormones on stroke injury. Dr. Dubal completed a medical internship and neurology residency at UCSF, where she also served as chief resident. She then completed a basic research and clinical fellowship in aging and dementias.

    Dr. Dubal leads a team unraveling how to slow or block aging of the body and brain. Using synergistic and cutting-edge approaches, her lab is investigating how an anti-aging approach holds promise in developing treatments to improve brain health in normal aging and disease. Her discoveries have been profiled in high-impact media such as NPR, the Economist, and the Wall Street Journal – and are recognized as potential therapies for living longer and better. Awards and honors for her work include the Elizabeth Young New Investigator Award, Paul Beeson Career Development Award through the NIA and American Federation for Aging Research, the Glenn Award for Basic Research in Mechanisms of Aging, and the UCSF David A. Coulter Endowed Chair in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 (voice) or 1-800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.


    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Looking Back After 150 Years: The American Civil War
  • Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
LOS ANGELES AFO - Campus Beautification at St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles Brand4U: Webinar, Personal Branding Lecture & Workshop
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     fpo

    What do you want people to think when they hear your name? What differentiates you from others?  Can you answer the question "Why should I hire you?" in 30 seconds?  Your personal brand defines YOU and you must manage it as it becomes your reputation. Join us for a two-part series (one pre-event webinar and branding homework exercise, and one in-person lecture/workshop) with SCU Professor of Practice H. Buford Barr titled "Brand4U" where you will explore techniques to help assure career success and the branding process.  You will develop your personal brand value statement then hone it through interactive groups.  "Tell me about yourself" is more challenging that you think.  Don't miss this opportunity.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 per person
Los Angeles Bronco Bench Foundation Golf Tournament
Los Angeles President's Club Dinner
  • Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Inline image 3

    Michael E. Engh, S.J., President of Santa Clara University cordially invites you to the Los Angeles President’s Club Dinner honoring members of the President’s Club and the 37th Annual Santa Claran of the Year award recipient(s) (still to be named).  

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $100 per person, $50 for Young Alumni (2004-2014)
    Location:
         The California Club
Los Angeles SCU vs. LMU Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 5:30 PM

     

    Root for our men's basketball team with fellow alumni as they take on the LMU Lions! Coaching staff will provide a Chalk Talk at the reception. Don't forget to wear your Bronco red!

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 per person, $10 for Pregame Reception only
    Location:
         Loyola Marymount University
Magis
MBA / MS Info Sessions
Memorial Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Men, Women and Travel: Tourism in Europe Since the Renaissance
  • Friday, Feb 13, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Feb 27, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Mock Interviews Feb 24
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 from 6:45 PM to 7:15 PM

    The art of interviewing is one of the most stressful and challenging parts of the job search, thus the more you can prepare and practice, the better you become at telling your story effectively. Each mock interview will be 30 minutes and give students the chance to practice interviewing and receive feedback.  The mock interview will focused on behavioral questions and is not industry specific. Bring a copy of a job description you are interested in to use in the session.

Modern Architecture: From Europe to America
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    When and why was Modern Architecture started? How was Modernism different in Europe than in America?  What role did California Modernism play in relation to the world scene?  And, even more specifically, what was the contribution of the Bay Area to the culture of Modernism in architecture? These are the central questions that this course will address with rarely seen material.  No previous knowledge of architecture is required.

    Instructor: Pierluigi Serraino is an architect, author, and educator.  He holds multiple professional and research degrees in architecture from Italy and the United States.  Prior to opening his independent design practice, he worked at Mark Mack Architects; Skidmore Owings, & Merrill; and Anshen + Allen, working on a variety of residential and institutional projects in the U.S. and overseas.  His work and writing have been published in professional and scholarly journals, among them Architectural Record and Journal of Architectural Education.  He has authored four books, including Modernism Rediscovered.  He has lectured widely on the subjects of mid-century modern, architectural photography, and digital design.  Projects under construction are in Berkeley and Alameda.  Forthcoming publications are The Creative Architect: The Great Lost Study of 1958 at UC Berkeley (2015)and, with Alan Hess, History of California Modernism (2016).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 21, 28

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

     


    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    When and why was Modern Architecture started? How was Modernism different in Europe than in America?  What role did California Modernism play in relation to the world scene?  And, even more specifically, what was the contribution of the Bay Area to the culture of Modernism in architecture? These are the central questions that this course will address with rarely seen material.  No previous knowledge of architecture is required.

    Instructor: Pierluigi Serraino is an architect, author, and educator.  He holds multiple professional and research degrees in architecture from Italy and the United States.  Prior to opening his independent design practice, he worked at Mark Mack Architects; Skidmore Owings, & Merrill; and Anshen + Allen, working on a variety of residential and institutional projects in the U.S. and overseas.  His work and writing have been published in professional and scholarly journals, among them Architectural Record and Journal of Architectural Education.  He has authored four books, including Modernism Rediscovered.  He has lectured widely on the subjects of mid-century modern, architectural photography, and digital design.  Projects under construction are in Berkeley and Alameda.  Forthcoming publications are The Creative Architect: The Great Lost Study of 1958 at UC Berkeley (2015)and, with Alan Hess, History of California Modernism (2016).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 21, 28

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

     


    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
Monterey/Salinas 11th Annual Dinner
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:30 PM

    jerry smith1

    Enjoy celebrating this annual event with Jerry Smith, current Women's Soccer Head Coach & Founder and Director of the new Jerry Smith Coaching for Life Academy at Santa Clara University.  Don't miss a delicious dinner, Jerry's remarks, and chance to mingle with other Broncos.  

    Our event venue this year is a new, Bronco family owned resturant.  The Scanlon Family (daughter, Michaela '16) will be opening their doors to help host this traditional event.  Don't miss it!

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $50 per person
    Location:
         La Mia Cucina Ristorante
MSE-GI Application Deadline
MSF Application Deadline
Nancy Wait-Kromm - Soprano Voice
New Music Festival
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM to Friday, Jan 30, 2015

    The 2015 New Music Festival at Santa Clara University will celebrate the life and work of Alvin Lucier, American composer and pioneer of experimental music and sound installations. The Festival comprises three days of concerts, lectures, and workshops with the presence of the composer himself.

    Lucier has been a pioneer in many areas of music composition and performance, including the notation of performer's physical gestures, the use of brain waves in live performance, and the evocation of room acoustics for musical purposes.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Not My Life
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 at 7:00 PM

    Viewing & discussion of film about Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery - sponsored by Religious Studies with support from Bannan Institute 

    Thursday, January 29 - 7 pm - Williman Room, Benson Center
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
PALM SPRINGS AFO - FIND Food Bank
Palm Springs Mass & Brunch with University President, Michael Engh, S.J.
  • Sunday, Feb 8, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:30 PM

     Michael E. Engh, S.J. preferred

    University President, Michael E. Engh, S.J. will be visiting our Palm Springs Chapter for Mass and brunch on Sunday, February 8.  You won't want to miss this chance to hear about the latest happenings at SCU!

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $35 per person
    Location:
         Xavier College Preparatory High School
Pause for Coz
Pause for Coz
Pep Band BBQ & Alumni Day
  • Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM

    Calling all Broncos! The SCU Pep Band, in conjunction with the Alumni Association, invites you to attend the annual Pep Band BBQ & Alumni Day prior to the Santa Clara vs. Gonzaga men's basketball game. Enjoy BBQ, salad, and a cash bar (beer and wine) before the big game. The event will take place in the gardens behind the Donohoe Alumni House.

    RSVP Today!
     


    Cost: $15 SCU Student, $20 Alumni/Guest
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
PHOENIX AFO with St. Vincent de Paul
Presidents' Day Holiday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Recent Grads BBQ
Resume Lab for Beginners
Resume Lab for Beginners
Reunion Class Block Party
Reunion Mass
Rush Hour Concert - Alex Christie
Rush Hour Concert - SCLOrk
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 5:30 PM

     Enjoy 50 minutes of music from our Laptop Orchestra (SCLOrk) and and then breeze through your commute!


    Cost: free
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Sacramento Annual St. Patrick's Day Luncheon with USF & St. Mary's
  • Tuesday, Mar 17, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM

    Join fellow Broncos, Dons, and Gaels as we celebrate St. Patrick's Day together! The lunch will include a program with updates from University representatives and our traditional SCU gift basket raffle. Don't forget to wear your green - or Santa Clara red!  

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $30 per person
    Location:
         The Dante Club
San Diego SCU vs. USD Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 9:30 PM

     New Student Calling

    Join fellow alumni as our Broncos take on the University of San Diego Toreros. Prior to the game, enjoy appetizers, beverages, and a "Chalk Talk" featuring a men's basketball coach with some insight into the game. Be sure to wear your Bronco red! 

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 per person
    Location:
         University of San Diego
SAN FRANCISCO AFO- Serving Meals at St. Anthony's Dining Room
San Francisco Mass & Brunch with Jack Treacy, S.J.
  • Sunday, Apr 12, 2015 at 11:00 AM

    Join Jack Treacy, S.J. '77 for Mass, followed by brunch at the beautiful St. Francis Yacth Club in San Francisco.

    Circle back for RSVP coming soon.


    Location:
         St. Francis Yacht Club, 99 Yacht Road, San Francisco
San Francisco SCU vs. USF Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 at 7:00 PM

    Join us as the Broncos take on USF in San Francisco. Show up and be loud, wear your Bronco red, and let's make this as close to a home game as possible!

    We will have access to the new Club Level, and price includes one free drink ticket and light appetizers. The Club Level offers beer and wine during the game, with a great view and atmosphere to watch the game! Must be 21 and older to attend.

     

    RSVP ONLINE


    Cost: $45 Per Person
    Location:
         University of San Francisco Campus
Santa Clara Valley 7th Annual Night at the Shark Tank
  • Wednesday, Apr 1, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:30 PM

     fpo

    Don't miss this opportunity to enjoy a night of Sharks hockey with fellow Broncos! A limited number of seats are still available for this great Santa Clara Valley Chapter tradition. We hope to see you there!

    $75 per person
    Includes Game Ticket, Dinner & Two Drink Tickets

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $75 per person
    Location:
         SAP Center
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Pizza and Basketball with Nativity students
SCU Community Day of Service
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

     Join the entire SCU Community including Faculty, Staff, Students and Alumni to volunteer at several projects including our Thriving Neighbors Initative at Washington school, Sacred Heart Community Services, and SCU's organic garden - The Forge.

    Check back for more detials and to RSVP.


    Cost: N/A
    Location:
         United States
SCU FOOTBALL Reunion
  • Sunday, May 17, 2015 from 12:30 PM to 5:00 PM

     All Football alumni, family and friends are invited back to campus to celebrate the wonderful relationships created while part of the Bronco football program.  The afternoon will start with Mass to honor the 30th anniversay of Pat Malley's passing.

    More details to come.....


    Cost: TBD
SEATTLE AFO - Jesuit Alumni Day of Service
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

    Join fellow Broncos and other Jesuit alumni for a Day of Service. Volunteers will meet at Seattle U. for a welcome program and registration and then go to designated sites.   All are welcome - bring a friend.


    Cost: N/A
Seattle Brand4U: Webinar, Personal Branding Lecture & Workshop
  • Monday, May 11, 2015

     fpo

    What do you want people to think when they hear your name? What differentiates you from others?  Can you answer the question "Why should I hire you?" in 30 seconds?  Your personal brand defines YOU and you must manage it as it becomes your reputation. Join us for a two-part series (one pre-event webinar and branding homework exercise, and one in-person lecture/workshop) with SCU Professor of Practice H. Buford Barr titled "Brand4U" where you will explore techniques to help assure career success and the branding process.  You will develop your personal brand value statement then hone it through interactive groups.  "Tell me about yourself" is more challenging that you think.  Don't miss this opportunity.

    Check back for more information soon!

SIG Aging Gracefully
  • Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Let’s explore aging together. We’ll talk about common problems, read the research on aging, shatter the myths of old age (physical, mental, social, and legal), and gain new insights that will help us make aging- related decisions. We’ll share our experiences, ask questions, discuss, and learn from the members of the group.

    The goal is to create a community where we can talk openly and help each other. 
     
    Our next meeting will be on Thursday, February 18  at 10:00 in Benson Center, Parlor A
      
    Contact Monica David monica.david123@gmail.com  if you are interested in joining this group.

    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlor A
SIG Appassionati Italiani
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
  • Friday, Mar 20, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
  • Friday, Apr 17, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
  • Friday, May 15, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
  • Friday, Jun 19, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
SIG Cultural Cornucopia
  • Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015
    Location: TBA
    Time: TBA
     
    Friends,
     
    Thanks for your comments, suggestions, and thought about next books. Here is what I propose:
     
    March 3: The Boys in the Boat
    May 12: Driving the King
    July 7: A History of the World in 12 Maps
     
    There was some interest in  rebooting the conversation about this year's Silicon Valley Reads books. We could schedule an extra special CC, perhaps in April or June, and talk in general about the immigrant experience and include the SV reads books and perhaps Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, too.

     

    Contact Facilitator Fred Gertler (fgertler@gmail.com) with any questions.

  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015
    Location: TBA
    Time: TBA
     
    Friends,
     
    Thanks for your comments, suggestions, and thought about next books. Here is what I propose:
     
    March 3: The Boys in the Boat
    May 12: Driving the King
    July 7: A History of the World in 12 Maps
     
    There was some interest in  rebooting the conversation about this year's Silicon Valley Reads books. We could schedule an extra special CC, perhaps in April or June, and talk in general about the immigrant experience and include the SV reads books and perhaps Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, too.

     

    Contact Facilitator Fred Gertler (fgertler@gmail.com) with any questions.

  • Tuesday, Jul 7, 2015
    Location: TBA
    Time: TBA
     
    Friends,
     
    Thanks for your comments, suggestions, and thought about next books. Here is what I propose:
     
    March 3: The Boys in the Boat
    May 12: Driving the King
    July 7: A History of the World in 12 Maps
     
    There was some interest in  rebooting the conversation about this year's Silicon Valley Reads books. We could schedule an extra special CC, perhaps in April or June, and talk in general about the immigrant experience and include the SV reads books and perhaps Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, too.

     

    Contact Facilitator Fred Gertler (fgertler@gmail.com) with any questions.

SIG Mystery Book Club
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    SIG Mystery Book Club Meeting. 

    The next Meeting will take place on January 29th from 11 am to noon. This meeting will be in Benson Center, Parlor A. 

     The book to be discussed is Dead Lagoon: An Aurelio Zen Mystery by Michael Dibdin.  See you there.

    For more information please contact Susan Haag at shaag408@yahoo.com


    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlor A
SIG Travel Luncheon
  • Saturday, Feb 14, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM

       pre-trip luncheon on Saturday afternoon, February 14th from 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

      post-trip luncheon on Friday afternoon, March 27th from 11:30 AM 0 1:30 PM

    Located in Vari Hall, Wiegand room 102 and the foyer. 

    *Please Note: The first luncheon will be catered by Bon Apetit (the onsite food service).  The second will be pot-luck. 

    If you have any questions please contact Sandra Gruver at sandra.gruver@comcast.net


    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         And the foyer
  • Saturday, Mar 21, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM

       pre-trip luncheon on Saturday afternoon, February 14th from 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

      post-trip luncheon on Friday afternoon, March 27th from 11:30 AM 0 1:30 PM

    Located in Vari Hall, Wiegand room 102 and the foyer. 

    *Please Note: The first luncheon will be catered by Bon Apetit (the onsite food service).  The second will be pot-luck. 

    If you have any questions please contact Sandra Gruver at sandra.gruver@comcast.net


    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         And the foyer
SIG Travel Show
Song and Dance Men of the Silver Screen
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Feb 23, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Mar 2, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Mar 9, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Speed Networking
  • Friday, Feb 13, 2015 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    This event, for students from all Graduate Business programs, connects students with professionals in various finance professions. Each group of students will be given 10-15 mintues to speak with each professional before moving on to meet with other professionals. Once everybody has made the rounds, students and guests will have a chance for casual networking. 

    This is a great opportunity for students and alumni to get to know one another and find out more about potential fields.

    If you are interested, please RSVP to business-alumni@scu.edu, with "Finance Connexion Speed Networking" in the title of your email. 


    Location: Lucas Hall, Forbes Family Conference Center
Spring 2015 Recess
Spring Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Spring Semester 2015 Begins
Spring Semester 2015 Ends
Start Up Expo
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Study Break Prayer: Eucharistic Adoration
Study Break Prayer: Eucharistic Adoration
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Taize
Study Break Prayer: Taize
Sunday Morning Liturgy
Tavola Italiana Winter 2015
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Winter quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!


    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on January 14th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  


    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday! Ci vediamo!


    Cost: free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Outdoor space in front of Casa (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
Teresa McCollough - Piano
The 7th Annual Hunger Action Summit: Food as Medicine
  • Friday, Jan 30, 2015 from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

     Please join the Food & Agribusiness Institute and Second Harvest Food Bank at the 7th Annual Hunger Action Summit. This year, the discussion will focus on the concept of "food as medicine." The forum will take place on January 30th, 2015 from 8:30 to 1:30 in the Locatelli Center on the Santa Clara University campus. To register for this free event, click here


    Cost: Free
    Location: Locatelli Center
The Business of Wine
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 8:00 PM

    Please join us for The Business of Wine on Friday, February 6th from 5:30 to 8! This event will feature a panel discussion on the wine industry, dinner and wine tasting.

    For more information, and to purchase tickets click here.

    Guest must be 21 and over. 


    Cost: $25
    Location: De Saisset Museum
The President's Dinner
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    Join University President, Michael E. Engh, S.J. for a celebration honoring the President's Club Members and the 2015 Alumni Award Recipients.

    More information to come.


    Cost: TBD
    Location: Mission Gardens
The War in the Pacific: The U.S. Versus Japan
  • Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
Theatre Behind the Scenes: A Moon for the Misbegotten
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
     
    A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O’Neill, is a sequel  to his  Long Day’s Journey into Night. It deals with themes of finding peace through human kinship rather than the whisky bottle, forgiveness and self-forgiveness.  It had its world premiere in Columbus, Ohio in 1947.  The play has been produced five times on Broadway, starting May 2, 1957.  It also was a television production, garnering five Emmy nominations and winning one.  Between October 13 and November 13, 2013, it was produced for the first time in Low German in Hamburg.  The role of James Tyrone, the play’s hero, is said to be based on Eugene O’Neill’s older brother, Jamie O’Neill.  This offering includes a pre-production class, tickets for the Sunday matinee production, and a post-production discussion.  Information about SCU’s play production and a tour of the theater is included. 

    Instructor: Frederick Tollini, S.J., has been at Santa Clara University since 1971, and has taught in the English and Theatre & Dance Departments (Chair 1980-93), specializing in Drama and Theater History, Shakespeare Studies and directing plays.  He holds a doctorate in Theater History from Yale University and has published three books:  Performance and Culture I-II  (American Heritage Press, 1995); Scene Design at the Court of Louis XIV (Edwin Mellon Press, 2003); and The Shakespeare Productions of Max Reinhardt (Edwin Mellon Press, 2004).  A fourth work, The Art of Variation in the Scene Designs of Donald Oenslager, is obtainable directly from the Mellon Press.  Fr. Tollini has directed over fifty plays and musicals, and acted in productions both at Santa Clara and in regional theater.  His musical background at Santa Clara includes founding the Bronco Philharmonic, predecessor to the current university symphony orchestra.  He is a Past President of the California Educational Theater Association (CETA).

    Class Session:  Saturday, February 28  
    Time:   2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM 
    Location:  Benson Center, Parlors B & C  
    Performance:   Sunday, March 1
    Time:  2:00PM -- one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  February 28)
    Location: Louis B. Mayer Theatre  

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Sunday, Mar 1, 2015 at 2:00 PM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
     
    A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O’Neill, is a sequel  to his  Long Day’s Journey into Night. It deals with themes of finding peace through human kinship rather than the whisky bottle, forgiveness and self-forgiveness.  It had its world premiere in Columbus, Ohio in 1947.  The play has been produced five times on Broadway, starting May 2, 1957.  It also was a television production, garnering five Emmy nominations and winning one.  Between October 13 and November 13, 2013, it was produced for the first time in Low German in Hamburg.  The role of James Tyrone, the play’s hero, is said to be based on Eugene O’Neill’s older brother, Jamie O’Neill.  This offering includes a pre-production class, tickets for the Sunday matinee production, and a post-production discussion.  Information about SCU’s play production and a tour of the theater is included. 

    Instructor: Frederick Tollini, S.J., has been at Santa Clara University since 1971, and has taught in the English and Theatre & Dance Departments (Chair 1980-93), specializing in Drama and Theater History, Shakespeare Studies and directing plays.  He holds a doctorate in Theater History from Yale University and has published three books:  Performance and Culture I-II  (American Heritage Press, 1995); Scene Design at the Court of Louis XIV (Edwin Mellon Press, 2003); and The Shakespeare Productions of Max Reinhardt (Edwin Mellon Press, 2004).  A fourth work, The Art of Variation in the Scene Designs of Donald Oenslager, is obtainable directly from the Mellon Press.  Fr. Tollini has directed over fifty plays and musicals, and acted in productions both at Santa Clara and in regional theater.  His musical background at Santa Clara includes founding the Bronco Philharmonic, predecessor to the current university symphony orchestra.  He is a Past President of the California Educational Theater Association (CETA).

    Class Session:  Saturday, February 28  
    Time:   2:00 PM  -  4:00 PM 
    Location:  Benson Center, Parlors B & C  
    Performance:   Sunday, March 1
    Time:  2:00PM -- one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  February 28)
    Location: Louis B. Mayer Theatre  

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
Vintage Santa Clara XXXII
  • Sunday, Sep 13, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM

     

    Don't miss the 32nd annual Vintage Santa Clara food and wine festival! Featuring over 50 food and wine booths, live music, and fun for all. Proceeds from the event support the Alumni Family Scholarship program.

    Tickets for the event will go on sale Monday, August 3 at 8 a.m. PST.


    Cost: TBD
    Location: Mission Gardens
WCC Tournament & A Bronco Reception
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015

    Join the SCU Alumni Association, the Bronco Bench Foundation, the Men's Basketball Program, and fellow alumni and fans for a reception in Las Vegas during the West Coast Conference Basketball Tournament. 

    Guests will enjoy hosted appetizers, a no-host bar, and a "chalk talk" from a member of the men's basketball coaching staff. Make sure to wear your Bronco red!

    Given the tournament format, please note we cannot confirm the time of the reception until the week of March 2nd. The reception will either be from 4pm-5:30pm or 6pm-7:30pm.


    Cost: $15 reception only, $50 reception & game ticket
    Location:
         McMullan's Irish Pub
What Does a Conductor Do?
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    You see them waving their arms and taking credit for the great performance an ensemble just gave, but what does a conductor actually do? The job of a conductor is complex and multifaceted, but often difficult to fully understand from the audience's perspective. If you've ever wondered what it takes to stand in front of a symphony orchestra or choir, and to take charge of the music they make, this class will reveal some of the mysteries. Participants will learn the basics of conducting gesture including patterns, cuing, and cut-offs, and take a behind the scenes tour of the preparatory work of a conductor. While years of formal music training are required to be a conductor, for this course all that is required is an appreciation of music and a willingness to try new things.  

    Instructor: Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire. Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling; the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch; the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus; and the Maryland Opera Studio. Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival. Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 17, 24

    New Location: Sobrato Residence Hall A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    You see them waving their arms and taking credit for the great performance an ensemble just gave, but what does a conductor actually do? The job of a conductor is complex and multifaceted, but often difficult to fully understand from the audience's perspective. If you've ever wondered what it takes to stand in front of a symphony orchestra or choir, and to take charge of the music they make, this class will reveal some of the mysteries. Participants will learn the basics of conducting gesture including patterns, cuing, and cut-offs, and take a behind the scenes tour of the preparatory work of a conductor. While years of formal music training are required to be a conductor, for this course all that is required is an appreciation of music and a willingness to try new things.  

    Instructor: Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire. Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling; the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch; the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus; and the Maryland Opera Studio. Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival. Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 17, 24

    New Location: Sobrato Residence Hall A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
Where Is the United States Economy Going: Stagnation or Growth?
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
WiB & FAN - Hang On!
  • Sunday, Feb 15, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM

    You trust them with your group project, but do you trust them to catch you when you fall?  Come climb with us at Touchstone Climbing Gym in Downtown San Jose if you dare.  Fee includes an intro to climbing class, gear rental and a day pass. Beverages and snacks will be provided for those who survive.


    Cost: $30.00
    Location:
         Touchstone Climbing Gym (Downtown SJ)
Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Wind Symphony presents concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Zora Neale Hurston & the Harlem Renaissance: Folklore, Gender & the Black Vernacular
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
First Name
Last Name
Email Address
 
If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please contact or 408 554-2382 two weeks prior to the event.

Jesuit Education at SCU

jesuit-education

Caring for the whole person.
An important principle of Jesuit education is care for the whole person. The Jesuit philosophy places a student's humanity first, creating a personalized educational environment where thoughtful questions can be considered.
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