Events

Upcoming events within the Ignatian Center.

San Diego National College Fair - San Diego, CA
"The Truth that Will Prevail": Frank Norris' The Octopus and the Evolution of a California Myth
  • Tuesday, Oct 13, 2015 at 1:00 PM to Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 at 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 13 and November 3

    Location: O'Connor Hall, Room 207

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course The Bay Area and CA Economy on Oct. 13*

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Great Questions of Existance on Nov. 3*

     

    In 1901, a young Frank Norris published The Octopus: A Story of California.    Meant to be the first book in a trilogy, the “Epic of the Wheat” examines the production, distribution, and consumption of a basic agricultural commodity as a lens through which to understand how capitalism touches American lives.   Norris structured The Octopus around the Mussel Slough tragedy, an 1880 gunfight that erupted over a land dispute between local farmers in the Southern San Joaquin Valley and supposed agents of the Southern Pacific Railroad.   By turning history into myth, Norris depicted both sides to be almost powerless to check the relentless, almost preternatural power of business trusts; because human greed and the lust for power work always in the interests of the “octopus,” a muckraker’s metaphor for the tentacles of the Railroad that controlled much of California’s economy.
    “The Truth that Will Prevail” will be a short two-part course.   The first part will explore the historical background of Norris’ book, its place within California’s tradition of social novels, its philosophical stance on American agrarianism, and the cultural conceptions of space—the Public Land Survey and notions of landscape and development—that drive much of the novel’s plot. The second part will be devoted to discussion of the novel, with special attention to its characters and the compelling depictions of California’s San Joaquin Valley that make the novel so memorable.   Reading The Octopus prior to class is highly recommended!   Class sessions will be split several weeks apart to enable class participants to finish the book.
     
    Terry Beers is Associate Chair and Professor in the English department at Santa Clara University.  He served as the general editor of the California Legacy Series of books, co-published by SCU and Heyday, and was the host of the "Your California Legacy" radio anthology, produced at KAZU Public Radio.  He is the author or editor of five books on California literature, including Gunfight at Mussel Slough: Evolution of a Western Myth, which includes a discussion of Frank Norris’ The Octopus.   Professor Beers is currently at work on another book, The End of Eden: Agrarian Spaces and the Rise of the California Social Novel.  Professor Beers lives in north Monterey County, where he trains sled dogs.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: O'Connor Hall
         Room 207
  • Tuesday, Nov 3, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 13 and November 3

    Location: O'Connor Hall, Room 207

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course The Bay Area and CA Economy on Oct. 13*

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Great Questions of Existance on Nov. 3*

     

    In 1901, a young Frank Norris published The Octopus: A Story of California.    Meant to be the first book in a trilogy, the “Epic of the Wheat” examines the production, distribution, and consumption of a basic agricultural commodity as a lens through which to understand how capitalism touches American lives.   Norris structured The Octopus around the Mussel Slough tragedy, an 1880 gunfight that erupted over a land dispute between local farmers in the Southern San Joaquin Valley and supposed agents of the Southern Pacific Railroad.   By turning history into myth, Norris depicted both sides to be almost powerless to check the relentless, almost preternatural power of business trusts; because human greed and the lust for power work always in the interests of the “octopus,” a muckraker’s metaphor for the tentacles of the Railroad that controlled much of California’s economy.
    “The Truth that Will Prevail” will be a short two-part course.   The first part will explore the historical background of Norris’ book, its place within California’s tradition of social novels, its philosophical stance on American agrarianism, and the cultural conceptions of space—the Public Land Survey and notions of landscape and development—that drive much of the novel’s plot. The second part will be devoted to discussion of the novel, with special attention to its characters and the compelling depictions of California’s San Joaquin Valley that make the novel so memorable.   Reading The Octopus prior to class is highly recommended!   Class sessions will be split several weeks apart to enable class participants to finish the book.
     
    Terry Beers is Associate Chair and Professor in the English department at Santa Clara University.  He served as the general editor of the California Legacy Series of books, co-published by SCU and Heyday, and was the host of the "Your California Legacy" radio anthology, produced at KAZU Public Radio.  He is the author or editor of five books on California literature, including Gunfight at Mussel Slough: Evolution of a Western Myth, which includes a discussion of Frank Norris’ The Octopus.   Professor Beers is currently at work on another book, The End of Eden: Agrarian Spaces and the Rise of the California Social Novel.  Professor Beers lives in north Monterey County, where he trains sled dogs.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: O'Connor Hall
         Room 207
12th Annual Bronco Legacy Barbeque
  • Friday, Sep 18, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM

     

    The Bronco Legacy BBQ is for incoming legacy students and their families and takes place on the Friday evening of Welcome Weekend. Legacy students are those whose parents, grandparents, or siblings also attended Santa Clara. This event recognizes the University's unique Santa Clara family and is a great way to meet others with strong SCU ties.
     

    Friday, September 18
    5:30pm - 7:00pm
    Mission Gardens

    $20 per person (including the incoming student)
    Children 12 and under are free
    Prices include BBQ dinner and beverages

    RSVP HERE!

     



    Cost: $20
    Location: Mission Gardens
2016 Austin J. Fagothey, S.J., Philosophy Conference: Global Human Rights
  • Saturday, Jan 30, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    In 2016, the topic of the annual Austin J. Fagothey, S.J., Philosophy Conference will be Global Human Rights.

    Confirmed speakers for the event include:

    Allen Buchanan, the James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University, and the Fagothey Distinguished Visiting Professor at Santa Clara University

    Samantha Besson, Professor of Public International Law and European Law at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland

    Carol Gould, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York

    Gopal Sreenivasan, the Crown Professor of Ethics and Professor of Philosophy at Duke University

    Co-sponsors include the School of Law, the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, and the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.

    Coffee and refreshments will be served.  Registration information, the conference program, and additional details will be available in October 2015.


    Cost: None
    Location: Learning Commons and Library, St. Clare Room
50th Anniversary of SCCAP Celebration
A Santa Clara Lessons and Carols
  • Thursday, Dec 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Class: Thursday, December 10 from 2:00 - 4:00 PM
               Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102
     
    Performance: Friday, December 11 at 8:00 PM and Sunday December 13 at 2:00 PM
               Location: Santa Clara Mission 
    (Mission Church will post online when tickets are available for purchase)
     
    King's College, Cambridge held their first service of nine lessons and carols in 1918, and now the famous format is broadcast around the world annually.  On December 11 and 13 2015, the Santa Clara Chorale will perform its own version of lessons and carols in an eclectic concert of familiar carols, holiday selections, all mixed together with contemplative readings offered by leaders from our local community.  In this class, we will explore the history of the nine lessons and carols format, and go behind the music to show how we create an integrated and exciting seasonal concert that offers a breadth of perspectives on the holidays and the season.  Class participants are encouraged to attend one of the Santa Clara Chorale holiday concerts, after participating in this class.
     
    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University.  As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire.  Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling, the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio.  Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival.  Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, D.C. and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI.  He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a M.M. from the University of Wisconsin, and a B.M. from the University of North Carolina Greensboro.  Scot has become a popular OLLI instructor since coming to SCU.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Friday, Dec 11, 2015 at 8:00 PM

    Register Here

    Class: Thursday, December 10 from 2:00 - 4:00 PM
               Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102
     
    Performance: Friday, December 11 at 8:00 PM and Sunday December 13 at 2:00 PM
               Location: Santa Clara Mission 
    (Mission Church will post online when tickets are available for purchase)
     
    King's College, Cambridge held their first service of nine lessons and carols in 1918, and now the famous format is broadcast around the world annually.  On December 11 and 13 2015, the Santa Clara Chorale will perform its own version of lessons and carols in an eclectic concert of familiar carols, holiday selections, all mixed together with contemplative readings offered by leaders from our local community.  In this class, we will explore the history of the nine lessons and carols format, and go behind the music to show how we create an integrated and exciting seasonal concert that offers a breadth of perspectives on the holidays and the season.  Class participants are encouraged to attend one of the Santa Clara Chorale holiday concerts, after participating in this class.
     
    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University.  As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire.  Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling, the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio.  Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival.  Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, D.C. and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI.  He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a M.M. from the University of Wisconsin, and a B.M. from the University of North Carolina Greensboro.  Scot has become a popular OLLI instructor since coming to SCU.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Sunday, Dec 13, 2015 at 2:00 PM

    Register Here

    Class: Thursday, December 10 from 2:00 - 4:00 PM
               Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102
     
    Performance: Friday, December 11 at 8:00 PM and Sunday December 13 at 2:00 PM
               Location: Santa Clara Mission 
    (Mission Church will post online when tickets are available for purchase)
     
    King's College, Cambridge held their first service of nine lessons and carols in 1918, and now the famous format is broadcast around the world annually.  On December 11 and 13 2015, the Santa Clara Chorale will perform its own version of lessons and carols in an eclectic concert of familiar carols, holiday selections, all mixed together with contemplative readings offered by leaders from our local community.  In this class, we will explore the history of the nine lessons and carols format, and go behind the music to show how we create an integrated and exciting seasonal concert that offers a breadth of perspectives on the holidays and the season.  Class participants are encouraged to attend one of the Santa Clara Chorale holiday concerts, after participating in this class.
     
    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University.  As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire.  Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling, the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio.  Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival.  Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, D.C. and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI.  He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a M.M. from the University of Wisconsin, and a B.M. from the University of North Carolina Greensboro.  Scot has become a popular OLLI instructor since coming to SCU.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
African American New Student Welcome Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 19, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2019!

    This reception is for all incoming first year and transfer students with African American ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as learn about different ways to get involved with the African American community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP HERE!


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Vari Hall
Alumni Family Picnic
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM



    Co-sponsored by the Athletics Department


    The Alumni Family Picnic features live music, games and activities, a petting zoo, pony rides, and bouncy houses. Participate in fun activities while you mix and mingle with some of SCU's current student athletes. There is no charge for the picnic's activities and attractions, though food and beverages are available for purchase.

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Host
    Location: Alameda Mall
Anastasia Tilbury Recital
  • Friday, Oct 9, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Class of ’95 Soprano Anastasia (Stacie) Tilbury will be presenting a vocal recital on Friday, October 9th at 4PM in the SCU Music Recital Hall.  Gems from the Classical and Romantic Era will be performed as well as contemporary songs by Ricky Ian Gordon and Joni Mitchell.  Anastasia will be joined by friend and classmate Rob Hampton; Seattle based guitar teacher and performer (www.heartwoodguitar.com).  There will be a little something for everyone in this recital and we hope you will join us.  A suggested donation of $15 will be taken at the door.  All proceeds go to Seneca Kinship, a San Jose based organization that supports foster children and their families.  http://senecafoa.org/about


    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Antioch USD College Fair - Antioch, CA
Armchair Traveler: Saint Petersburg, the Cultural Capital of Russia
  • Wednesday, Oct 7, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 7, 14

    Location:  Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    Saint Petersburg is Russia’s second largest city, its cultural heart, and my hometown.  For almost two thirds of its 300-year-long history, Saint Petersburg served as Russia’s capital.  From the reforms of Peter the Great to the Decembrist revolt of 1825, and again from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 900-day-long siege during World War II, the most important dramas of Russia’s history played out on the city’s stage. Saint Petersburg has also served as a gateway to and from Europe: Italian architects, Dutch shipbuilders, French restaurateurs, German artisans all contributed to the image of the city, depicted by Russian literary greats such as Pushkin and Dostoyevsky.  Splendid architectural gems like the Winter Palace, the Peter-and-Paul Fortress, and the Church of the Savior-on-Blood make Saint Petersburg a veritable open-air museum.  Indoor museums such as the Hermitage and the Russian Museum boast some of the world’s best collections of Western and Russian art, respectively.  The city’s numerous rivers and canals, with their gorgeous bridges, earned it the nickname of “Venice of the North”— but Venice lacks Saint Petersburg’s “White Nights,” when the sun barely sets, turning bridges, statues, and wrought-iron latticework into magical silhouettes.  Yet the city’s physical geography presents a challenge too.  Built on a marshy, flood-prone delta of the Neva River, Saint Petersburg is a marvel of urban engineering.  Its location at 60°N makes it the world’s largest northern city; its population is greater than that of Helsinki, Stockholm, Oslo, Copenhagen, Reykjavik, and Anchorage combined—by a margin of nearly two million people!  Join me for an exploration of this magnificent city and its historical significance.
     
    Asya Pereltsvaig was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. She received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities.  Her expertise is in language and history, and the relationship between them; and her general academic interests include cultural and intellectual history of Russia and of its different peoples.  Her most recent books, Languages of the World: an Introduction and The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics were published by Cambridge University Press.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Wednesday, Oct 14, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 7, 14

    Location:  Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    Saint Petersburg is Russia’s second largest city, its cultural heart, and my hometown.  For almost two thirds of its 300-year-long history, Saint Petersburg served as Russia’s capital.  From the reforms of Peter the Great to the Decembrist revolt of 1825, and again from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 900-day-long siege during World War II, the most important dramas of Russia’s history played out on the city’s stage. Saint Petersburg has also served as a gateway to and from Europe: Italian architects, Dutch shipbuilders, French restaurateurs, German artisans all contributed to the image of the city, depicted by Russian literary greats such as Pushkin and Dostoyevsky.  Splendid architectural gems like the Winter Palace, the Peter-and-Paul Fortress, and the Church of the Savior-on-Blood make Saint Petersburg a veritable open-air museum.  Indoor museums such as the Hermitage and the Russian Museum boast some of the world’s best collections of Western and Russian art, respectively.  The city’s numerous rivers and canals, with their gorgeous bridges, earned it the nickname of “Venice of the North”— but Venice lacks Saint Petersburg’s “White Nights,” when the sun barely sets, turning bridges, statues, and wrought-iron latticework into magical silhouettes.  Yet the city’s physical geography presents a challenge too.  Built on a marshy, flood-prone delta of the Neva River, Saint Petersburg is a marvel of urban engineering.  Its location at 60°N makes it the world’s largest northern city; its population is greater than that of Helsinki, Stockholm, Oslo, Copenhagen, Reykjavik, and Anchorage combined—by a margin of nearly two million people!  Join me for an exploration of this magnificent city and its historical significance.
     
    Asya Pereltsvaig was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. She received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities.  Her expertise is in language and history, and the relationship between them; and her general academic interests include cultural and intellectual history of Russia and of its different peoples.  Her most recent books, Languages of the World: an Introduction and The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics were published by Cambridge University Press.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
Asian Pacific Islander New Student Welcome Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 19, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2019!

    This reception is for all incoming first year and transfer students with Asian/Pacific Islander ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as learn about different ways to get involved with the API community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP HERE!


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Nobili Residence Hall
Austin Summer Send Off Reception
  • Tuesday, Sep 8, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    **BY INVITATION ONLY**

    Welcome to the Class of 2019!
     

    The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity for you to meet other incoming students from your area before you begin at SCU.
     

    You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering at the Salt Lick Restaurant. This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates. 
     

    Dinner Reception ~ Casual Attire
     

    RSVP by calling Maggie Asher '16 at (408) 551-3459 or by emailing masher@scu.edu

     


    Cost: N/A
    Location:
         The Salt Lick Restaurant
Boise National College Fair - Boise, ID
Bronco 5K Fun Run/Walk
Bronco Fan Fest at the Men's Basketball Red & White Scrimmage
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Join Santa Clara Athletics in the Leavey Center to celebrate your Bronco Pride! This free, family-friendly event features a sneak peek of the men’s basketball team as they play an intra-squad scrimmage. Mix and mingle with student-athletes and coaches for autographs and photo ops and explore the concourse for kid-friendly games, freebies and giveaways.

     

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Leavey Center
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting
  • Wednesday, Oct 7, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 1:30 PM

    The Business Ethics Partnership brings together executives and scholars in a forum designed to increase the members’ knowledge about effectively managing ethics in business organizations. Founded in 2003, the partnership currently includes 11 business organizations and 10 faculty members who share the goals of honing ethics and compliance policies at member organizations and advancing the state of business ethics knowledge.

    Business Ethics Partnership Members Only


    Location: Lucas Hall, Forbes Family Conference Center
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting, Delaware Court Visit
California Political History: a Unique Case Study
  • Thursday, Oct 29, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location: Sobrato Hall A, Rooms B & C

    You can’t understand the present without being grounded in history.  That simple axiom is the guidepost for this course on California Political History.  Time will be spent tracing, dissecting, and assembling the many elements that have contributed to the make-up of California.  It’s a state where reputation and reality collide more times than not, a place where it is almost impossible to sew so many historical themes into a single, coherent political quilt.  Yet, its very strands of history—social, anthropological, racial, economic, and demographic—combine to make the California of today a unique case study, which promises to evolve as much in the future as it has from the past.       
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.   Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Rooms B & C
  • Thursday, Nov 5, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location: Sobrato Hall A, Rooms B & C

    You can’t understand the present without being grounded in history.  That simple axiom is the guidepost for this course on California Political History.  Time will be spent tracing, dissecting, and assembling the many elements that have contributed to the make-up of California.  It’s a state where reputation and reality collide more times than not, a place where it is almost impossible to sew so many historical themes into a single, coherent political quilt.  Yet, its very strands of history—social, anthropological, racial, economic, and demographic—combine to make the California of today a unique case study, which promises to evolve as much in the future as it has from the past.       
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.   Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Rooms B & C
  • Thursday, Nov 12, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location: Sobrato Hall A, Rooms B & C

    You can’t understand the present without being grounded in history.  That simple axiom is the guidepost for this course on California Political History.  Time will be spent tracing, dissecting, and assembling the many elements that have contributed to the make-up of California.  It’s a state where reputation and reality collide more times than not, a place where it is almost impossible to sew so many historical themes into a single, coherent political quilt.  Yet, its very strands of history—social, anthropological, racial, economic, and demographic—combine to make the California of today a unique case study, which promises to evolve as much in the future as it has from the past.       
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.   Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Rooms B & C
  • Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location: Sobrato Hall A, Rooms B & C

    You can’t understand the present without being grounded in history.  That simple axiom is the guidepost for this course on California Political History.  Time will be spent tracing, dissecting, and assembling the many elements that have contributed to the make-up of California.  It’s a state where reputation and reality collide more times than not, a place where it is almost impossible to sew so many historical themes into a single, coherent political quilt.  Yet, its very strands of history—social, anthropological, racial, economic, and demographic—combine to make the California of today a unique case study, which promises to evolve as much in the future as it has from the past.       
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.   Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Rooms B & C
  • Thursday, Dec 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location: Sobrato Hall A, Rooms B & C

    You can’t understand the present without being grounded in history.  That simple axiom is the guidepost for this course on California Political History.  Time will be spent tracing, dissecting, and assembling the many elements that have contributed to the make-up of California.  It’s a state where reputation and reality collide more times than not, a place where it is almost impossible to sew so many historical themes into a single, coherent political quilt.  Yet, its very strands of history—social, anthropological, racial, economic, and demographic—combine to make the California of today a unique case study, which promises to evolve as much in the future as it has from the past.       
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.   Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Rooms B & C
California Railroads and the Impact on State Development
  • Monday, Sep 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, September 28 and October 5

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102
     

    If you have learned California history, you know about the Indians, Spanish missions, and the Gold Rush.  But what happened after that?  This course will survey a half-century of California history after the Gold Rush.  It starts with California's railroad era, the construction of the transcontinental railroad in the 1860’s, and the impact on state development.  Chinese immigration and the anti-Chinese movement will also be covered, as will Japanese immigration and the challenges that they faced.  The second half of the course looks at political corruption in the railroad era and how the California Progressives under Governor Hiram Johnson kicked “the railroad” out of state politics. 
     
    Dr. Glen Gendzel is Associate Professor of History at San José State University.   He is a Bay Area native with a B.A. in History from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.   He has taught at five universities in five states.   His primary focus is on California history and U.S. history in the fields of politics, business, culture, immigration, labor, and foreign policy.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
  • Monday, Oct 5, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, September 28 and October 5

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102
     

    If you have learned California history, you know about the Indians, Spanish missions, and the Gold Rush.  But what happened after that?  This course will survey a half-century of California history after the Gold Rush.  It starts with California's railroad era, the construction of the transcontinental railroad in the 1860’s, and the impact on state development.  Chinese immigration and the anti-Chinese movement will also be covered, as will Japanese immigration and the challenges that they faced.  The second half of the course looks at political corruption in the railroad era and how the California Progressives under Governor Hiram Johnson kicked “the railroad” out of state politics. 
     
    Dr. Glen Gendzel is Associate Professor of History at San José State University.   He is a Bay Area native with a B.A. in History from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.   He has taught at five universities in five states.   His primary focus is on California history and U.S. history in the fields of politics, business, culture, immigration, labor, and foreign policy.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
Campus Tour - Friday
Campus Tour - Saturday
Career Coaching Drop-In Hours
Catholic Collegiate Choral Conference
  • Friday, Oct 23, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Gathering fine select choral ensembles from Catholic colleges and universities around the state, the first annual California Catholic Collegiate Choral Festival is hosted this inaugural year at Santa Clara University with an 7:30pm Festival Performance in the beautiful Mission Santa Clara. Students from Loyola Marymount University, Saint Mary's College of California, the University of San Diego, and Santa Clara University will work with acclaimed conductor Edward Maclary from the University of Maryland.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Mission Church
Central Coast 42nd Annual Dinner
Central Oregon PNACAC College Fair - Redmond, OR
Chicago National College Fair - Chicago, IL
Chicano Latino New Student Reception
  • Saturday, Sep 19, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

    The Alumni Association welcomes the Class of 2019!

    This reception is for all incoming first year and transfer students with Chicano/a Latino/a ties. It is a great opportunity to meet other Broncos with the same background, as well as learn about different ways to get involved with the Chicano Latino community at SCU.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    RSVP HERE!


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
China in Revolution
  • Monday, Oct 26, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Japanese Woodblocking pt.2 on Oct. 26 & Nov. 2*

     

    China's turbulent 20th century saw the collapse of traditional dynastic rule; a struggle for power amongst rival warlords; the emergence of the Chinese Nationalist Party; a brutal invasion by the Japanese; civil war; and chaos generated by the radical policies of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong.  Yet, despite it all, the last two decades of the century saw China's emergence as the increasingly powerful economic giant that U.S. leaders now view as a threat to American global hegemony.  This course will provide the historical background to China's rise.
     
    Dr. E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and for the past 25 years has taught East Asian, Southeast Asian, and world history.  He is the author of: Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1941-1945; Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE and the Free Thai Underground During World War II;  and various articles and book chapters on international relations in Asia in the twentieth century.  He has also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era. His current research focuses on American missionaries in China.  He has also become a very popular Osher course presenter.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Nov 2, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Japanese Woodblocking pt.2 on Oct. 26 & Nov. 2*

     

    China's turbulent 20th century saw the collapse of traditional dynastic rule; a struggle for power amongst rival warlords; the emergence of the Chinese Nationalist Party; a brutal invasion by the Japanese; civil war; and chaos generated by the radical policies of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong.  Yet, despite it all, the last two decades of the century saw China's emergence as the increasingly powerful economic giant that U.S. leaders now view as a threat to American global hegemony.  This course will provide the historical background to China's rise.
     
    Dr. E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and for the past 25 years has taught East Asian, Southeast Asian, and world history.  He is the author of: Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1941-1945; Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE and the Free Thai Underground During World War II;  and various articles and book chapters on international relations in Asia in the twentieth century.  He has also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era. His current research focuses on American missionaries in China.  He has also become a very popular Osher course presenter.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Nov 9, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Japanese Woodblocking pt.2 on Oct. 26 & Nov. 2*

     

    China's turbulent 20th century saw the collapse of traditional dynastic rule; a struggle for power amongst rival warlords; the emergence of the Chinese Nationalist Party; a brutal invasion by the Japanese; civil war; and chaos generated by the radical policies of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong.  Yet, despite it all, the last two decades of the century saw China's emergence as the increasingly powerful economic giant that U.S. leaders now view as a threat to American global hegemony.  This course will provide the historical background to China's rise.
     
    Dr. E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and for the past 25 years has taught East Asian, Southeast Asian, and world history.  He is the author of: Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1941-1945; Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE and the Free Thai Underground During World War II;  and various articles and book chapters on international relations in Asia in the twentieth century.  He has also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era. His current research focuses on American missionaries in China.  He has also become a very popular Osher course presenter.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Nov 16, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Japanese Woodblocking pt.2 on Oct. 26 & Nov. 2*

     

    China's turbulent 20th century saw the collapse of traditional dynastic rule; a struggle for power amongst rival warlords; the emergence of the Chinese Nationalist Party; a brutal invasion by the Japanese; civil war; and chaos generated by the radical policies of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong.  Yet, despite it all, the last two decades of the century saw China's emergence as the increasingly powerful economic giant that U.S. leaders now view as a threat to American global hegemony.  This course will provide the historical background to China's rise.
     
    Dr. E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and for the past 25 years has taught East Asian, Southeast Asian, and world history.  He is the author of: Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1941-1945; Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE and the Free Thai Underground During World War II;  and various articles and book chapters on international relations in Asia in the twentieth century.  He has also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era. His current research focuses on American missionaries in China.  He has also become a very popular Osher course presenter.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Nov 30, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course Japanese Woodblocking pt.2 on Oct. 26 & Nov. 2*

     

    China's turbulent 20th century saw the collapse of traditional dynastic rule; a struggle for power amongst rival warlords; the emergence of the Chinese Nationalist Party; a brutal invasion by the Japanese; civil war; and chaos generated by the radical policies of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong.  Yet, despite it all, the last two decades of the century saw China's emergence as the increasingly powerful economic giant that U.S. leaders now view as a threat to American global hegemony.  This course will provide the historical background to China's rise.
     
    Dr. E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and for the past 25 years has taught East Asian, Southeast Asian, and world history.  He is the author of: Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1941-1945; Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE and the Free Thai Underground During World War II;  and various articles and book chapters on international relations in Asia in the twentieth century.  He has also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era. His current research focuses on American missionaries in China.  He has also become a very popular Osher course presenter.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
Chocolate: A Religious Experience
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

    Presented by Howard Peters, J.D. '78 & Sally Peters

    Chocolate has been a part of religious ceremonies for well over two thousand years starting with the
    Olmec, Mayan and Aztec civilizations. Chocolate is not mentioned in the Holy Scriptures, but is 
    false chocolate mentioned - carob?  Cacao & chocolate as a drink with medicinal and magical properties was kept a trade secret within the Catholic church and the aristocracy in Spain for over 150 years. Those of the Jewish faith became the merchants/traders of chocolate.  The British Quakers introduced chocolate as a drink for the masses about 1800.  It was to be a substitute for the cheap gin (from fermented juniper berries) which was ruining lives.  The Quakers in the UK were the main chocolatiers. They were socially responsible and created model factory communities around the chocolate plants for their workers. In the US, Milton Hershey was raised a Mennonite, married a vivacious Irish Catholic girl and did the same.  Mars did not. Many facts are presented.  You can connect the dots and draw your own conclusions.

     
    Many chocolate samples will be provided.   And if you stay to the bitter end, there will be a free drawing for a ten pound bar of Guittard dark bittersweet chocolate - the chocolate supplier for See's Candies.
     

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
Christmas Eve: JST Administrative Holiday
Christmas: Administrative holiday / Library closed
Class of 1950 Reunion Lunch
Class of 1955 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1960 Friday Dinner
Class of 1960 Panel - A Road Well Travelled
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

    A panel discussion featuring a distinguished selection of class members who will reflect on the paths their lives and careers have taken since our days together at Santa Clara.  Scheduled to participate: Everett Alvarez, Alex Brindle, Lou Castruccio, Leon Panetta, Steve Schott, Gary Smith, S.J., and John Sobrato; moderated by Woody Needom.

    **Please note that this event is for the Class of 1960 and their guests only. Thank you for your understanding. 

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Class of 1960 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1965 Co-ed Gathering
Class of 1965 Golden Anniversary Dinner
Class of 1965 Kickoff Dinner
Class of 1970 Reunion Party
Class of 1975 Reunion Party
Class of 1980 Reunion Party
Class of 1985 Reunion Party
Class of 1990 Reunion Party
Class of 1995 Reunion Party
Class of 2000 Reunion Party
Class of 2005 Reunion Party
Class of 2010 Reunion Party
Coffee Talk: Law School Updates with the Dean
College of Arts & Sciences Reception
Commencement Recital
  • Saturday, Jun 4, 2016 at 2:00 PM

    Join the SCU Department of Music as we say farewell to our graduating seniors with an efternoon of music and celebration.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Copy of Fr. Coz Banquet
  • Friday, Oct 9, 2015 at 6:30 PM

    This banquet is in memory of Fr. Coz and his remarkable contributions to the rugby program. We welcome all alumni, parents, and families to the event as we join to celebrate the success of the Santa Clara University Men’s Rugby Program.

    Click here to RSVP


    Cost: $100 individual, $75 recent alumni, $100 sponsor player/coach, $200 table sign
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Coz Cup Rugby Game
CPSY x330: A Day at San Quentin
  • Saturday, Oct 17, 2015 from 7:30 AM to 2:30 PM

    CPSY x330 – A Day in San Quentin
    ORIENTATION:  TBD , Room TBD
    TRIP:
    October 17, 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., San Quentin Prison, $192

    *** .6 CEUS ***

    Register for Fall »

     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    The prison system in California is one of the largest in the United States, serving over 136,000 inmates. San Quentin Prison, a minimum/maximum facility, is located in Marin County, and serves over 5,300 inmates at 171.3% capacity. Although one of the oldest institutions in California, it is considered one of the most desirable from the standpoint of the inmates. One of the nationally recognized programs is the S.Q.U.I.R.E.S. (San Quentin Utilization of Inmate Resources and Studies) that provides counseling for troubled teens and teens who have demonstrated a propensity to engage in juvenile delinquent conduct and activities. Issues such as family relations, education, gang activity/violence, drug and alcohol use, H.I.V. and AIDS, health and hygiene and developing and maintaining self-esteem are the focus of the interaction between the inmates and youth. The CPD course will allow you the rare opportunity to view, as an observer, how the SQUIRES Program works as well have a tour of the facility including, but not limited to, cell blocks, recreation area, dining facilities and death row. The course, that starts at 7:30 am at San Quentin and concludes at 2:30 pm, will be limited to 15 students. A month before the visit, there will be a mandated half hour orientation held at Santa Clara University to review the procedures and protocols. A background check will be conducted for those participating including submission of your driver's license and Social Security Number for clearance.
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES
     
    Participants will have the opportunity to view one of the most successful intervention programs, SQUIRES, to help keep young adults from entering into the judicial system.
    Participants will observe various therapeutic counseling techniques utilized by the members of the SQUIRES as they relate with youth, as well as have the opportunity to partake in the interaction between the youth and SQUIRES members.
    Participants will network with professionals who work with at-risk youth and adult offenders.
    Participants will be able to visit San Quentin Prison and interact with the inmates and see the facilities in which they spend their incarcerated years.
    Participants will gain an understanding about prison life as seen through the eyes inmates.
     
    TARGET AUDIENCE
     
    Practicing MFTs, LCSWs, Students in both Counseling Psychology and Education, Teachers, School Counselors, Educational Administrators and others interested in learning about the California Prison System.
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Bob Michels was born in San Francisco, California. Currently, Michels is a full time lecturer for the Counseling Psychology and Education Departments and is Coordinator for the CPSY Corrections Emphasis program. He received his B.A. degree and elementary teaching credential from San Francisco State University, after studying education and psychology and received his M.A. degree from San Jose State University in Educational Administration as well as a secondary teaching credential. Bob has been a teacher and administrator in elementary, middle and high schools. His career emphasis primarily has focused on working with at-risk youth and adult offenders in correctional facilities. Bob is considered an expert in the field of non-conventional youth and adults. He is often sought out as a guest speaker dealing with delinquent and troubled youth and adults in the correctional system.

    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
CPSY x855: Aging and Relationships
  • Friday, Oct 16, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Oct 17, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 1:15 PM
    CPSY x855 – Aging and Relationships
    TWO DAY WORKSHOP: Friday, October 16, 9 a.m - 4:30 p.m and Saturday, October 17, 9a.m - 1:15p.m
    Guadalupe Hall, Room. 148, $288
     
     
     *Course meets the qualifications for 10 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.
     
    Santa Clara University, Center for Professional Development is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, and maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
     
     

    Register for Fall »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    As the population grays, we will see more and more people in the 60 plus age group. Is there anything unique about this population? Are there problems and issues specific to aging that are within the expertise of the counselor?
     
    Aging can be considered a continuum. On one end are the seriously distressed. Here clients may be concerned about memory gaps, disorientation, and general loss of function. This may include those who are dementing, depressed, or severely anxious. The counselor needs to be aware of the signs and symptoms of these disorders as well as the treatment opportunities.
     
    On the other end of the continuum are those who have been consciously successful at aging. Here are people who seem to be alive and present. They enjoy all aspects of their lives and continue to grow and make new memories. What are the values, attitudes, and behaviors that contribute to this? These qualities are teachable and the counseling format may be the most appropriate context to teach them.
     
     
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Hayes has had a dual career as a therapist and u teacher since 1966. After Spending three years working in State hospitals and five and one half years working for Santa Clara County Mental Health, he began his private practice. He continues his practice in Saratoga, working with individuals, couples and seniors.
     
    He has taught at a number of colleges and universities including San Jose State and, for thirty five years, at Santa Clara University. Even though he taught courses in Psychopathology and Clinical Assessment, his main interest has been Health Psychology.
     
    He spent twenty five years focusing on chronic illness and worked closely with the Multiple Sclerosis Society. He was able to bring this interest to Santa Clara University by starting the Master’s program in Health Psychology. From there it was an easy transition to his interest in Aging as a component of Health Psychology.
     
    For ten years now Dr. Hayes has led courses on Aging for the Center for Professional Development as well as giving talks and seminars at various hospitals in the area.
     
    From his beginnings as a Health Psychologist, Dr. Hayes has been interested in how individuals form the experience of themselves. Bodies evolve and change. Aging certainly involves physical and psychological change. Yet individuals continue to create and maintain an identity, often transforming these changes into consciousness and growth.
     
     

     


    Cost: $288
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room. 148
CPSY x932: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
  • Saturday, Oct 3, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x932– Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy

    Saturday, October 3rd, 9 a.m to 4 p.m, Guadalupe Hall, Room 147, $168

    Course meets the qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Santa Clara University, Center for Professional Development is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists, and maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

     

    Register for Fall »

     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Tired of listening to someone spew information at you all day? This day-long interactive workshop will provide you with the information you need, but will also give you a chance to sharpen your own ethical decision-making skills at the same time. We will discuss issues of informed consent, confidentiality, reporting laws, client rights and counselor responsibilities, etc. The format will include case studies, brief presentations, discussion, and didactic exercises designed to help you explore your own values and ethical framework. This workshop is tailed specifically for MFT’s.

     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO
     
    A former Jesuit, Donald St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministries and Counseling Psychology. St. Louis completed his D.Min. from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1986. He is the Founder and Director of The California Institute for Sexual Recovery in San Francisco and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in San Francisco and Santa Clara. A former Jesuit, St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology and Pastoral Ministries.
     

     


    Cost: $168
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room. 147
Cycling Club Ride
Dallas SCU Alumni Night at the Rangers
  • Saturday, Sep 12, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Join us for a tailgate and baseball game as the Rangers take on the Oakland A's. The game starts at 7:05 PM, but join us in the parking lot starting at 5 PM to gather with alumni and grab a bite before watching the game. There are a limited number of game tickets, so sign up today!

     

    RSVP HERE


    Cost: $30 Per Person
Deadline for full refund/Deadline to make changes in enrollment without fee/Deadline to defend and file thesis or dissertation without need to be registered in the fall/ Deadline to submit SRC8888 and 9999 forms
Deadline for full refund/Deadline to make changes in enrollment without fee/Deadline to defend and file thesis or dissertation without need to be registered in the fall/Deadline to submit SRC8888 and 9999 forms
Denver Annual Night at the Rockies
  • Thursday, Sep 3, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 9:30 PM


    Join us for the Denver Alumni Chapter's annual Night at the Rockies on September 3. The Rockies with be playing the World Champion Giants, and there are a limited amount of tickets, so sign up soon! We will be meeting at Fado Irish Pub beforehand for a quick bite, and then heading over to the game together.

    RSVP Here

     

     


    Cost: $20 For Game Ticket and Reception. $10 For Reception Only
    Location:
         Fado Irish Pub: 1735 19th Street, Denver, CO
Denver National College Fair - Denver, CO
Douglas County PNACAC Fair - Roseburg, OR
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2016
Early Registration for Intersession 2016 & Spring Semester 2016
East Contra Costa County High Schools College Fair - Pittsburg, CA
Easter Bunny Brunch
  • Sunday, Mar 13, 2016 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Join us for a delicious brunch, visit with the Easter Bunny, and egg hunt in the Mission Gardens.

     

    Information for registration will be available in January 2016.


    Cost: TBD
    Location: Adobe Lodge
         Nobili Hall
Easter: Library closed
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers
  • Saturday, Nov 7, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers 

    DATE: November 7th, 

    TIME: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m

    LOCATION: Guadalupe Hall Rm.147

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement.

    Register for Fall »

     

     



    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.

     


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room. 147
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)
  • Monday, Oct 19, 2015 to Friday, Oct 30, 2015

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)

    DATE: October 19th through October 30th, 2015 *Must register by October 7th

    TIME: Any time that works for you.But assignments must be completed by due date.

    LOCATION: Anywhere you have access to the internet.

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement.

    Register for Fall »

     

     



    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
Elk Grove Unified School District College Night - Elk Grove, CA
EMBA International Trip
EMBA Leadership Intensive
EMBA Term I
Engineering Career Fair
  • Thursday, Jan 14, 2016 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Connect with a variety of employers hiring for internships and entry level positions. 

    This event is open to SCU Enginnering students and alumni.  Be prepared to show Campus ID. 


    Location: Locatelli Center
English Romantic Poetry: The Artistic Revolution
  • Thursday, Sep 24, 2015 from 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, September 24 and October 1, 8

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 237
     

    The literary Romantic period in England produced some of the most beautiful, passionate and challenging poetry.  This course will focus on the short/shorter works of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, and John Keats through background lectures, close reading, and analysis. These poets deserve to be read because they are so very soul-filling, and are still so very relevant in 2015! 
    The three sessions of this course will cover the following topics:
     
    Week 1:  Background to the Romantic Period: Preface to the Lyrical Ballads
                     William Blake Bio + his “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience”
    Week 2: Wordsworth Bio + his sonnets
    Week 3:  Keats’ and Shelley’s Bio’s and odes and sonnets.
     
    Tom Alessandri is a well regarded OLLI instructor, having previously taught courses in Faulkner and The Godfather Trilogy.  He has just finished his 40th year of teaching at Bellarmine College Prep, which included 32 years running the Theatre Arts program.  He has an A.B. in Humanities from the University of San Francisco and a M.A. cum laude in English from the University of Washington.
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 237
  • Thursday, Oct 1, 2015 from 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, September 24 and October 1, 8

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 237
     

    The literary Romantic period in England produced some of the most beautiful, passionate and challenging poetry.  This course will focus on the short/shorter works of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, and John Keats through background lectures, close reading, and analysis. These poets deserve to be read because they are so very soul-filling, and are still so very relevant in 2015! 
    The three sessions of this course will cover the following topics:
     
    Week 1:  Background to the Romantic Period: Preface to the Lyrical Ballads
                     William Blake Bio + his “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience”
    Week 2: Wordsworth Bio + his sonnets
    Week 3:  Keats’ and Shelley’s Bio’s and odes and sonnets.
     
    Tom Alessandri is a well regarded OLLI instructor, having previously taught courses in Faulkner and The Godfather Trilogy.  He has just finished his 40th year of teaching at Bellarmine College Prep, which included 32 years running the Theatre Arts program.  He has an A.B. in Humanities from the University of San Francisco and a M.A. cum laude in English from the University of Washington.
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 237
  • Thursday, Oct 8, 2015 from 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, September 24 and October 1, 8

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 237
     

    The literary Romantic period in England produced some of the most beautiful, passionate and challenging poetry.  This course will focus on the short/shorter works of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, and John Keats through background lectures, close reading, and analysis. These poets deserve to be read because they are so very soul-filling, and are still so very relevant in 2015! 
    The three sessions of this course will cover the following topics:
     
    Week 1:  Background to the Romantic Period: Preface to the Lyrical Ballads
                     William Blake Bio + his “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience”
    Week 2: Wordsworth Bio + his sonnets
    Week 3:  Keats’ and Shelley’s Bio’s and odes and sonnets.
     
    Tom Alessandri is a well regarded OLLI instructor, having previously taught courses in Faulkner and The Godfather Trilogy.  He has just finished his 40th year of teaching at Bellarmine College Prep, which included 32 years running the Theatre Arts program.  He has an A.B. in Humanities from the University of San Francisco and a M.A. cum laude in English from the University of Washington.
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 237
ESS Test event
Estate Planning for the Not So Rich and Famous
Faculty Recital
  • Saturday, Oct 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The talented faculty of Santa Clara University perform in a year long season of concerts.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Faculty Recital
  • Friday, Jan 15, 2016 at 7:30 PM

    The talented faculty of Santa Clara University perform in a year long season of concerts.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Faculty Recital
  • Friday, Feb 5, 2016 at 7:30 PM

    The talented faculty of Santa Clara University perform in a year long season of concerts.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Faculty Recital
  • Friday, Apr 8, 2016 at 7:30 PM

    The talented faculty of Santa Clara University perform in a year long season of concerts.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Fall Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Oct 7, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Connect with a variety of employers hiring for internships and entry level positions.  ALL majors encouraged to attend!

    This event is open to SCU students and alumni.  Be prepared to show Campus ID.   


    Location: Malley Center
Fall Semester 2015 ends
Family Day at the deSaisset Museum
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Join the de Saisset Museum for a free Family Day Festival celebrating 60 years of bringing arts to the Santa Clara community. Festivities include hands-on-art activities, a photo booth, an art scavenger hunt, performances, a birthday celebration and more! Come and go as you please, but don’t miss the chance to see what the arts at SCU have to offer.

     

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: De Saisset Museum
Festival of Lights
  • Friday, Dec 4, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    At Santa Clara University, the Festival of Lights has marked the beginning of the holiday season for many for over a decade. Festival of Lights: This year, just as many cities celebrate the change of seasons and the lengthening of days by lighting landmarks in vast and complex displays, the Santa Clara University Choirs join with production manager and lighting designer Carolyn Foot in a program that is both about light and featuring it. With music ranging from holiday favorites to exciting new directions in repertoire, this will be a beautiful evening of light.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers*
  • Monday, May 2, 2016

    Must be graded, defended if appropriate, and the required number of final, corrected and signed copies must be submitted along with all paperwork to the JST Registrar's office.  See handbooks for details.

Film Odyssey - Totally 80's: Motion Picture Masterpieces from the Reagan Era
  • Wednesday, Sep 23, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A
     

    For some, it was a decade of affluence, decadence and giant shoulder pads. For others, it was a time of confusion, fear and pastel pants.   And the filmmakers working in this turbulent decade found stories to describe the extremes found in the brave new world of the 1980's.  Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson on a cinematic journey through which we accompany Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster discovering a new universe in Bill Forsyth's Local Hero (1983); go on the road with Paul Le Mat and Jason Robards in Jonathan Demme's Melvin and Howard (1980); hang out in the after world with Audrey Hepburn and Richard Dreyfuss in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989); let Kris Kristofferson guide us through the shadows of Alan Rudolph's Trouble In Mind (1985); and simply experience the art of living with Gena Rowlands in director John Cassavetes' masterpiece Love Streams (1984).  A spirited discussion follows every film.

    Mark Larson works in theatre and film and is one of OLLI@SCU’s most popular instructors.  His 2014 theatre work - Six Psalms - was produced at Marquette University.  His most recent work includes documenting life at Story & King Roads in San Jose through a series of broadsides; devising a sound art adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s play Mexico for the City of Cupertino; and collaborating with SCU Professor David Pleins on staging his translation of Lamentations for the Mission Santa Clara in 2016.

     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Sep 30, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A
     

    For some, it was a decade of affluence, decadence and giant shoulder pads. For others, it was a time of confusion, fear and pastel pants.   And the filmmakers working in this turbulent decade found stories to describe the extremes found in the brave new world of the 1980's.  Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson on a cinematic journey through which we accompany Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster discovering a new universe in Bill Forsyth's Local Hero (1983); go on the road with Paul Le Mat and Jason Robards in Jonathan Demme's Melvin and Howard (1980); hang out in the after world with Audrey Hepburn and Richard Dreyfuss in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989); let Kris Kristofferson guide us through the shadows of Alan Rudolph's Trouble In Mind (1985); and simply experience the art of living with Gena Rowlands in director John Cassavetes' masterpiece Love Streams (1984).  A spirited discussion follows every film.

    Mark Larson works in theatre and film and is one of OLLI@SCU’s most popular instructors.  His 2014 theatre work - Six Psalms - was produced at Marquette University.  His most recent work includes documenting life at Story & King Roads in San Jose through a series of broadsides; devising a sound art adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s play Mexico for the City of Cupertino; and collaborating with SCU Professor David Pleins on staging his translation of Lamentations for the Mission Santa Clara in 2016.

     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Oct 7, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A
     

    For some, it was a decade of affluence, decadence and giant shoulder pads. For others, it was a time of confusion, fear and pastel pants.   And the filmmakers working in this turbulent decade found stories to describe the extremes found in the brave new world of the 1980's.  Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson on a cinematic journey through which we accompany Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster discovering a new universe in Bill Forsyth's Local Hero (1983); go on the road with Paul Le Mat and Jason Robards in Jonathan Demme's Melvin and Howard (1980); hang out in the after world with Audrey Hepburn and Richard Dreyfuss in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989); let Kris Kristofferson guide us through the shadows of Alan Rudolph's Trouble In Mind (1985); and simply experience the art of living with Gena Rowlands in director John Cassavetes' masterpiece Love Streams (1984).  A spirited discussion follows every film.

    Mark Larson works in theatre and film and is one of OLLI@SCU’s most popular instructors.  His 2014 theatre work - Six Psalms - was produced at Marquette University.  His most recent work includes documenting life at Story & King Roads in San Jose through a series of broadsides; devising a sound art adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s play Mexico for the City of Cupertino; and collaborating with SCU Professor David Pleins on staging his translation of Lamentations for the Mission Santa Clara in 2016.

     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Oct 14, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A
     

    For some, it was a decade of affluence, decadence and giant shoulder pads. For others, it was a time of confusion, fear and pastel pants.   And the filmmakers working in this turbulent decade found stories to describe the extremes found in the brave new world of the 1980's.  Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson on a cinematic journey through which we accompany Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster discovering a new universe in Bill Forsyth's Local Hero (1983); go on the road with Paul Le Mat and Jason Robards in Jonathan Demme's Melvin and Howard (1980); hang out in the after world with Audrey Hepburn and Richard Dreyfuss in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989); let Kris Kristofferson guide us through the shadows of Alan Rudolph's Trouble In Mind (1985); and simply experience the art of living with Gena Rowlands in director John Cassavetes' masterpiece Love Streams (1984).  A spirited discussion follows every film.

    Mark Larson works in theatre and film and is one of OLLI@SCU’s most popular instructors.  His 2014 theatre work - Six Psalms - was produced at Marquette University.  His most recent work includes documenting life at Story & King Roads in San Jose through a series of broadsides; devising a sound art adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s play Mexico for the City of Cupertino; and collaborating with SCU Professor David Pleins on staging his translation of Lamentations for the Mission Santa Clara in 2016.

     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Oct 21, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A
     

    For some, it was a decade of affluence, decadence and giant shoulder pads. For others, it was a time of confusion, fear and pastel pants.   And the filmmakers working in this turbulent decade found stories to describe the extremes found in the brave new world of the 1980's.  Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson on a cinematic journey through which we accompany Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster discovering a new universe in Bill Forsyth's Local Hero (1983); go on the road with Paul Le Mat and Jason Robards in Jonathan Demme's Melvin and Howard (1980); hang out in the after world with Audrey Hepburn and Richard Dreyfuss in Steven Spielberg's Always (1989); let Kris Kristofferson guide us through the shadows of Alan Rudolph's Trouble In Mind (1985); and simply experience the art of living with Gena Rowlands in director John Cassavetes' masterpiece Love Streams (1984).  A spirited discussion follows every film.

    Mark Larson works in theatre and film and is one of OLLI@SCU’s most popular instructors.  His 2014 theatre work - Six Psalms - was produced at Marquette University.  His most recent work includes documenting life at Story & King Roads in San Jose through a series of broadsides; devising a sound art adaptation of Gertrude Stein’s play Mexico for the City of Cupertino; and collaborating with SCU Professor David Pleins on staging his translation of Lamentations for the Mission Santa Clara in 2016.

     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
Financial Fraud: Avoid at All Costs!
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

    MCLE Presentation – 1.0 Legal Ethics

    Presented by Philip L. Gregory J.D./MBA ’80, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy

    Gregory will discuss prevention, detection, investigation, and prosecution of financial fraud. Recognize and combat investment opportunity “red flags” and learn about the impact of Ponzi schemes. Attorneys from Cotchett were the first legal team to meet with Bernie Madoff in North Carolina Federal Prison and have represented victims of other investor schemes.

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 135
Fostering Family Philanthropy
  • Friday, Oct 9, 2015 from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Fostering Family Philanthropy
    Tips and strategies to encourage philanthropy with children and grandchildren.

    This session will share ideas of how to teach and involve family in making charitable decisions together, how these efforts can instill within your children and grandchildren the value of helping others while having a positive shared family experience. The presenter is Tom Crotty '75, Managing Director with the Family Office Advisory, Ascent Private Capital Management/US Bank.

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
Fr. Coz Banquet
  • Friday, Oct 9, 2015 at 6:30 PM

    This banquet is in memory of Fr. Coz and his remarkable contributions to the rugby program. We welcome all alumni, parents, and families to the event as we join to celebrate the success of the Santa Clara University Men’s Rugby Program.

    Click here to RSVP


    Cost: $100 individual, $75 recent alumni, $100 sponsor player/coach, $200 table sign
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Fresno Summer Send Off Reception
  • Wednesday, Sep 9, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


    **BY INVITATION ONLY**

    Welcome to the Class of 2019!

     

    The Alumni Association would like to offer an opportunity for you to meet other incoming students from your area before you begin at SCU.
     

    You and your parents are invited to attend an informal gathering hosted by Tom '85, Karen '86 & Nick '18 Ferdinandi. This is a chance for you to get together and talk with both current students and alumni who have experienced Santa Clara, as well as meet your future classmates. 
     

    Dinner Reception ~ Casual Attire
     

    RSVP by calling (559) 436-1915 or emailing: the4ferds@sbcglobal.net

     


    Cost: N/A
    Location:
         Piazza del Pane
From Pirates to Poobahs, From Magistrates to Magicians: the Comic Operas of Gilbert and Sullivan
  • Monday, Oct 26, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    The comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan were the Beach Blanket Babylon of Victorian London.  This class will explore these operas as masterworks in their own right, as well as the way in which they affectionately poke fun at the musical, social, and political world of their time and place.  The composer Sir Arthur Sullivan created multiple levels of musical parody, referring to the music from Renaissance madrigals to Japanese marches.  No person or institution from the Queen herself, to the Royal Navy, to the church, to the class system was safe from the sharp-witted satires of W.S. Gilbert, who wrote the sparkling words to these operas.  We will learn about what made these operas so topical, and explore how and why they have stood the test of time.  No previous musical experience is necessary for this class.  Come, listen, learn, and join in the adventure.
     
    John Prescott received his M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from U.C. Berkeley.  He has been the recipient of a number of academic honors, including the British Marshall Scholarship for two years of study at St. John’s College in Cambridge, England, as well as a year’s study at Oxford University’s Worcester College.  Dr. Prescott wrote his Doctoral dissertation on John Stanley, the 18th-century blind organist, conductor, violinist and impresario.  He has taught music courses at U.C. Berkeley and music theory at the Crowden School (Berkeley, CA), and was the musicologist for the San Francisco Elderhostel Arts and Humanities Program.  Dr. Prescott is in demand as a pre-concert lecturer, having worked extensively with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Cal performances, and the Livermore Valley Opera.  For the past two years, he has been a popular faculty member at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at U.C. Berkeley and San Francisco State University.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Nov 2, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    The comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan were the Beach Blanket Babylon of Victorian London.  This class will explore these operas as masterworks in their own right, as well as the way in which they affectionately poke fun at the musical, social, and political world of their time and place.  The composer Sir Arthur Sullivan created multiple levels of musical parody, referring to the music from Renaissance madrigals to Japanese marches.  No person or institution from the Queen herself, to the Royal Navy, to the church, to the class system was safe from the sharp-witted satires of W.S. Gilbert, who wrote the sparkling words to these operas.  We will learn about what made these operas so topical, and explore how and why they have stood the test of time.  No previous musical experience is necessary for this class.  Come, listen, learn, and join in the adventure.
     
    John Prescott received his M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from U.C. Berkeley.  He has been the recipient of a number of academic honors, including the British Marshall Scholarship for two years of study at St. John’s College in Cambridge, England, as well as a year’s study at Oxford University’s Worcester College.  Dr. Prescott wrote his Doctoral dissertation on John Stanley, the 18th-century blind organist, conductor, violinist and impresario.  He has taught music courses at U.C. Berkeley and music theory at the Crowden School (Berkeley, CA), and was the musicologist for the San Francisco Elderhostel Arts and Humanities Program.  Dr. Prescott is in demand as a pre-concert lecturer, having worked extensively with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Cal performances, and the Livermore Valley Opera.  For the past two years, he has been a popular faculty member at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at U.C. Berkeley and San Francisco State University.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Nov 9, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    The comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan were the Beach Blanket Babylon of Victorian London.  This class will explore these operas as masterworks in their own right, as well as the way in which they affectionately poke fun at the musical, social, and political world of their time and place.  The composer Sir Arthur Sullivan created multiple levels of musical parody, referring to the music from Renaissance madrigals to Japanese marches.  No person or institution from the Queen herself, to the Royal Navy, to the church, to the class system was safe from the sharp-witted satires of W.S. Gilbert, who wrote the sparkling words to these operas.  We will learn about what made these operas so topical, and explore how and why they have stood the test of time.  No previous musical experience is necessary for this class.  Come, listen, learn, and join in the adventure.
     
    John Prescott received his M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from U.C. Berkeley.  He has been the recipient of a number of academic honors, including the British Marshall Scholarship for two years of study at St. John’s College in Cambridge, England, as well as a year’s study at Oxford University’s Worcester College.  Dr. Prescott wrote his Doctoral dissertation on John Stanley, the 18th-century blind organist, conductor, violinist and impresario.  He has taught music courses at U.C. Berkeley and music theory at the Crowden School (Berkeley, CA), and was the musicologist for the San Francisco Elderhostel Arts and Humanities Program.  Dr. Prescott is in demand as a pre-concert lecturer, having worked extensively with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Cal performances, and the Livermore Valley Opera.  For the past two years, he has been a popular faculty member at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at U.C. Berkeley and San Francisco State University.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Nov 16, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    The comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan were the Beach Blanket Babylon of Victorian London.  This class will explore these operas as masterworks in their own right, as well as the way in which they affectionately poke fun at the musical, social, and political world of their time and place.  The composer Sir Arthur Sullivan created multiple levels of musical parody, referring to the music from Renaissance madrigals to Japanese marches.  No person or institution from the Queen herself, to the Royal Navy, to the church, to the class system was safe from the sharp-witted satires of W.S. Gilbert, who wrote the sparkling words to these operas.  We will learn about what made these operas so topical, and explore how and why they have stood the test of time.  No previous musical experience is necessary for this class.  Come, listen, learn, and join in the adventure.
     
    John Prescott received his M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from U.C. Berkeley.  He has been the recipient of a number of academic honors, including the British Marshall Scholarship for two years of study at St. John’s College in Cambridge, England, as well as a year’s study at Oxford University’s Worcester College.  Dr. Prescott wrote his Doctoral dissertation on John Stanley, the 18th-century blind organist, conductor, violinist and impresario.  He has taught music courses at U.C. Berkeley and music theory at the Crowden School (Berkeley, CA), and was the musicologist for the San Francisco Elderhostel Arts and Humanities Program.  Dr. Prescott is in demand as a pre-concert lecturer, having worked extensively with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Cal performances, and the Livermore Valley Opera.  For the past two years, he has been a popular faculty member at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at U.C. Berkeley and San Francisco State University.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Nov 30, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 30

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    The comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan were the Beach Blanket Babylon of Victorian London.  This class will explore these operas as masterworks in their own right, as well as the way in which they affectionately poke fun at the musical, social, and political world of their time and place.  The composer Sir Arthur Sullivan created multiple levels of musical parody, referring to the music from Renaissance madrigals to Japanese marches.  No person or institution from the Queen herself, to the Royal Navy, to the church, to the class system was safe from the sharp-witted satires of W.S. Gilbert, who wrote the sparkling words to these operas.  We will learn about what made these operas so topical, and explore how and why they have stood the test of time.  No previous musical experience is necessary for this class.  Come, listen, learn, and join in the adventure.
     
    John Prescott received his M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology from U.C. Berkeley.  He has been the recipient of a number of academic honors, including the British Marshall Scholarship for two years of study at St. John’s College in Cambridge, England, as well as a year’s study at Oxford University’s Worcester College.  Dr. Prescott wrote his Doctoral dissertation on John Stanley, the 18th-century blind organist, conductor, violinist and impresario.  He has taught music courses at U.C. Berkeley and music theory at the Crowden School (Berkeley, CA), and was the musicologist for the San Francisco Elderhostel Arts and Humanities Program.  Dr. Prescott is in demand as a pre-concert lecturer, having worked extensively with the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Cal performances, and the Livermore Valley Opera.  For the past two years, he has been a popular faculty member at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes at U.C. Berkeley and San Francisco State University.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
Fusion
  • Friday, Jun 3, 2016 at 7:30 PM

    The SCU Concert Choir and Chamber Singers team up with the SCU Orchestra in a wide ranging program to close out the academic year.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
General Registration Fall Semester 2015
General Registration for Spring Semester 2016
Geosciences and the Arts
  • Friday, Oct 30, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, October 30 and November 6, 13

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151

    Connections amongst the Arts and Geosciences will be explored, with the goal of utilizing the broad spectrum of the Arts as a base from which to explore the Earth and understand fundamental geologic concepts.  The nature of the artistic and scientific endeavor will be compared, and various aspects of the geosciences studied from both a geologic and artistic perspective.  In the process, class participants will be introduced to the profound implications of an understanding of geologic time, the nature of earth materials (minerals, rocks, soil, sediment), internally derived mechanisms of crustal evolution (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes), surficial processes and landforms, and their role as agents of geologic change.
     
    The goals of this course are to demonstrate how linear thinking is not restricted to the scientist, and intuition is not the sole realm of the artist, and to show how aspects of the Arts may be used to generate interest and gain insights into the workings of the Earth.  Art is central to the Earth, both figuratively and literally.  A visually striking reminder of this relationship is made apparent by covering the first and last letters of the word “Earth.” This is more than a clever manipulation of letters; it is a clear indication of how integral Art is to the Earth, and can be used as a basis for utilizing aspects of the Arts to study and enhance understanding of the Geosciences.
     
    Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his Ph.D. in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.   A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he most recently taught “The Geology of the National Parks of the West” at The Villages during the 2015 Spring Quarter.

    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Friday, Nov 6, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, October 30 and November 6, 13

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151

    Connections amongst the Arts and Geosciences will be explored, with the goal of utilizing the broad spectrum of the Arts as a base from which to explore the Earth and understand fundamental geologic concepts.  The nature of the artistic and scientific endeavor will be compared, and various aspects of the geosciences studied from both a geologic and artistic perspective.  In the process, class participants will be introduced to the profound implications of an understanding of geologic time, the nature of earth materials (minerals, rocks, soil, sediment), internally derived mechanisms of crustal evolution (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes), surficial processes and landforms, and their role as agents of geologic change.
     
    The goals of this course are to demonstrate how linear thinking is not restricted to the scientist, and intuition is not the sole realm of the artist, and to show how aspects of the Arts may be used to generate interest and gain insights into the workings of the Earth.  Art is central to the Earth, both figuratively and literally.  A visually striking reminder of this relationship is made apparent by covering the first and last letters of the word “Earth.” This is more than a clever manipulation of letters; it is a clear indication of how integral Art is to the Earth, and can be used as a basis for utilizing aspects of the Arts to study and enhance understanding of the Geosciences.
     
    Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his Ph.D. in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.   A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he most recently taught “The Geology of the National Parks of the West” at The Villages during the 2015 Spring Quarter.

    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Friday, Nov 13, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, October 30 and November 6, 13

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151

    Connections amongst the Arts and Geosciences will be explored, with the goal of utilizing the broad spectrum of the Arts as a base from which to explore the Earth and understand fundamental geologic concepts.  The nature of the artistic and scientific endeavor will be compared, and various aspects of the geosciences studied from both a geologic and artistic perspective.  In the process, class participants will be introduced to the profound implications of an understanding of geologic time, the nature of earth materials (minerals, rocks, soil, sediment), internally derived mechanisms of crustal evolution (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes), surficial processes and landforms, and their role as agents of geologic change.
     
    The goals of this course are to demonstrate how linear thinking is not restricted to the scientist, and intuition is not the sole realm of the artist, and to show how aspects of the Arts may be used to generate interest and gain insights into the workings of the Earth.  Art is central to the Earth, both figuratively and literally.  A visually striking reminder of this relationship is made apparent by covering the first and last letters of the word “Earth.” This is more than a clever manipulation of letters; it is a clear indication of how integral Art is to the Earth, and can be used as a basis for utilizing aspects of the Arts to study and enhance understanding of the Geosciences.
     
    Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his Ph.D. in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.   A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he most recently taught “The Geology of the National Parks of the West” at The Villages during the 2015 Spring Quarter.

    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
Gianera Society Lunch
  • Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM



    Special lunch for our Golden Broncos, featuring the induction of the Class of 1965 into the William C. Gianera, S.J. Society.

    Alumni celebrating a reunion this year (class year ends in 0 or 5) and their guests are complimentary. All others are $20 per person.

    Visit the Grand Reunion website to RSVP >>


    Cost: No Charge for Reunion Alumni; $20 per person for all others
    Location: Benson Center, Marketplace
Good Friday: Academic and Administrative holiday / Library closed
Great Questions of Existence: an Interfaith Dialogue
  • Tuesday, Oct 27, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 27 and November 3, 10, 17 and December 1

    Location: Daly Science, Room 206

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course "The Truth That will Prevail" on Nov. 3*

    An interfaith group of religious leaders will explore a wide range of topics describing the similarities and differences among these great world religions – Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Zen Buddhism, and Buddhism.  These questions include: creation; why we exist; what/where is God; why we die and what happens after death; and how to balance tradition and modernity.  The speakers will also be asked to discuss three things not known about their religion and de-mystifying stereotypes.  The course will be moderated by previous OLLI@SCU instructor Rabbi Dana Magat
     
    The speakers are:
    Rabbi Magat (Judaism)—10/27
    Father Jon Pedigo (Catholicism)—11/3
    Iman Tahir Anwar (Islam)—11/10
    Jian Ying Shifu (from Zen Center of Sunnyvale)—11/17
    Rev. Gerald Sakamoto (Buddhism)—12/1
     
    Rabbi Dana Magat became Temple Emanu-El’s Senior Rabbi in July 1999.  Prior to that, he served four years as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Beth Israel in San Diego.  Rabbi Magat’s first pulpit was in Miami, where he was the Assistant Rabbi/Director of Education for Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Before his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1993, he earned a Masters in Education from the Fingerhut School of Education at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles.
     
    Rabbi Magat is actively involved in interfaith relations. He is the immediate past Chair of the Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice for Santa Clara County.  He also serves on the board of Chai House, Shalom Bayit, Northern California Board of Rabbis, and Home First.  He has served as President of the Cantors and Rabbis Association of Greater San Jose and has been a board member of Hillel of Silicon Valley, the Jewish Community Center, and the Pacific Association of American Rabbis.  Rabbi Magat has taught three classes for OLLI on Israel and Introduction to Judaism. 
     
    Father Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of northern California.  He has been active in civic affairs and social justice causes for over 30 years.  Since his ordination to the Diocese of San Jose in 1991, Father Pedigo has been involved with several local social justice causes and inter-faith dialogues.  He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, in the East Side of the city of San Jose; and he is currently the diocesan Director for Justice for Immigrants in the Diocese of San Jose.   Father Pedigo is a 2004 recipient of the Martin Luther King Good Neighbor Award and has been awarded the 2008 Immigrant Advocate of the Year by SIREN (Services, Immigrants Rights and Education Network); the 2010 Director’s Award from the Human Relations Commission of Santa Clara County; and the 2013 Cesar Chavez Social Justice Award from American Muslim Voice.  He is an Active PACT Clergy leader.  Fr. Pedigo also serves on the Sacred Heart Community Service Board, and on the Inter-Faith Council on Economics and Justice Board of Santa Clara County, as well as being a 2012 Rockwood Fellow for Immigrant Leaders in California.  Father Pedigo holds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University and a Master of Music from Indiana University, Bloomington.  He did his theology studies at St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park and holds a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from SCU’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley.
     
    Tahir Anwar is an Imam, a teacher, an activist, a husband, a father, and most importantly, a servant of Allah.  Born in London, England, he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1983.  Upon completing his religious studies in India, he has been serving as the Imam of one of the oldest masjids in the country, the Islamic Center of San Jose, since 2000.  After teaching middle school at one of the oldest Muslim schools in the country for 7 years, he is the founding board member of Averroes High School, the Bay Area’s first Muslim high school.  He teaches Islamic Law at the renowned Zaytuna College, America’s first Muslim liberal arts college in Berkeley.  He is currently the Chairman for the Board of NISA, North American Islamic Shelter for the Abused, an organization that works towards alleviating issues related to abuse and domestic violence.  NISA also runs a shelter for abused women in the Bay Area.  Mr. Anwar is also the founding board member of Islamic Art Exhibit, an annual traveling exhibit rooted in the Islamic tradition; and he sits on the Executive Committee for the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the country’s largest Muslim umbrella organization.  He has a passion for community service and has served on the Human Rights Commission for the City of San Jose for over 5 years, and the Human Relations Commission for the County of Santa Clara for one year. Mr. Anwar also leads a group for Hajj each year, which has been covered by CNN twice.
     
    Venerable JianYing  Shifu, Abbot, Chung Tai Zen Center of Sunnyvale,grew up in Taiwan and received two doctorate degrees in the U.S. --  a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, with a concentration in Buddhism, from Rice University.  He was ordained by Grand Master WeiChueh in 1998, later serving as a Vice Abbot at Chung Tai Chan Monastery.  In January 2012, the Grand Master appointed him Abbot of the Zen Center of Sunnyvale.  As a scholar and a practitioner, JianYing Shifu strives to bring theories and practices together.
     
    Gerald Sakamoto was born in Hawaii.  He has a B.A. in Liberal Studies, Buddhism, from the University of Hawaii and was ordained the following year in Kyoto, Jodo Shinshu, Nishi Hongwanji.  He has had assignments in the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii and with Oakland and White River Buddhist Churches.  He has served the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin since 1986.  In his role as National Ministers Association Chair from 2001-2005, the following resolutions were approved: 1) noninterference by government of gay marriages, and 2) opposition to preemptive military action and war.  His current interests include photography, barbecue, woodworking, and aquaponics.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 206
  • Tuesday, Nov 3, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 27 and November 3, 10, 17 and December 1

    Location: Daly Science, Room 206

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course "The Truth That will Prevail" on Nov. 3*

    An interfaith group of religious leaders will explore a wide range of topics describing the similarities and differences among these great world religions – Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Zen Buddhism, and Buddhism.  These questions include: creation; why we exist; what/where is God; why we die and what happens after death; and how to balance tradition and modernity.  The speakers will also be asked to discuss three things not known about their religion and de-mystifying stereotypes.  The course will be moderated by previous OLLI@SCU instructor Rabbi Dana Magat
     
    The speakers are:
    Rabbi Magat (Judaism)—10/27
    Father Jon Pedigo (Catholicism)—11/3
    Iman Tahir Anwar (Islam)—11/10
    Jian Ying Shifu (from Zen Center of Sunnyvale)—11/17
    Rev. Gerald Sakamoto (Buddhism)—12/1
     
    Rabbi Dana Magat became Temple Emanu-El’s Senior Rabbi in July 1999.  Prior to that, he served four years as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Beth Israel in San Diego.  Rabbi Magat’s first pulpit was in Miami, where he was the Assistant Rabbi/Director of Education for Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Before his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1993, he earned a Masters in Education from the Fingerhut School of Education at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles.
     
    Rabbi Magat is actively involved in interfaith relations. He is the immediate past Chair of the Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice for Santa Clara County.  He also serves on the board of Chai House, Shalom Bayit, Northern California Board of Rabbis, and Home First.  He has served as President of the Cantors and Rabbis Association of Greater San Jose and has been a board member of Hillel of Silicon Valley, the Jewish Community Center, and the Pacific Association of American Rabbis.  Rabbi Magat has taught three classes for OLLI on Israel and Introduction to Judaism. 
     
    Father Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of northern California.  He has been active in civic affairs and social justice causes for over 30 years.  Since his ordination to the Diocese of San Jose in 1991, Father Pedigo has been involved with several local social justice causes and inter-faith dialogues.  He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, in the East Side of the city of San Jose; and he is currently the diocesan Director for Justice for Immigrants in the Diocese of San Jose.   Father Pedigo is a 2004 recipient of the Martin Luther King Good Neighbor Award and has been awarded the 2008 Immigrant Advocate of the Year by SIREN (Services, Immigrants Rights and Education Network); the 2010 Director’s Award from the Human Relations Commission of Santa Clara County; and the 2013 Cesar Chavez Social Justice Award from American Muslim Voice.  He is an Active PACT Clergy leader.  Fr. Pedigo also serves on the Sacred Heart Community Service Board, and on the Inter-Faith Council on Economics and Justice Board of Santa Clara County, as well as being a 2012 Rockwood Fellow for Immigrant Leaders in California.  Father Pedigo holds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University and a Master of Music from Indiana University, Bloomington.  He did his theology studies at St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park and holds a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from SCU’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley.
     
    Tahir Anwar is an Imam, a teacher, an activist, a husband, a father, and most importantly, a servant of Allah.  Born in London, England, he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1983.  Upon completing his religious studies in India, he has been serving as the Imam of one of the oldest masjids in the country, the Islamic Center of San Jose, since 2000.  After teaching middle school at one of the oldest Muslim schools in the country for 7 years, he is the founding board member of Averroes High School, the Bay Area’s first Muslim high school.  He teaches Islamic Law at the renowned Zaytuna College, America’s first Muslim liberal arts college in Berkeley.  He is currently the Chairman for the Board of NISA, North American Islamic Shelter for the Abused, an organization that works towards alleviating issues related to abuse and domestic violence.  NISA also runs a shelter for abused women in the Bay Area.  Mr. Anwar is also the founding board member of Islamic Art Exhibit, an annual traveling exhibit rooted in the Islamic tradition; and he sits on the Executive Committee for the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the country’s largest Muslim umbrella organization.  He has a passion for community service and has served on the Human Rights Commission for the City of San Jose for over 5 years, and the Human Relations Commission for the County of Santa Clara for one year. Mr. Anwar also leads a group for Hajj each year, which has been covered by CNN twice.
     
    Venerable JianYing  Shifu, Abbot, Chung Tai Zen Center of Sunnyvale,grew up in Taiwan and received two doctorate degrees in the U.S. --  a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, with a concentration in Buddhism, from Rice University.  He was ordained by Grand Master WeiChueh in 1998, later serving as a Vice Abbot at Chung Tai Chan Monastery.  In January 2012, the Grand Master appointed him Abbot of the Zen Center of Sunnyvale.  As a scholar and a practitioner, JianYing Shifu strives to bring theories and practices together.
     
    Gerald Sakamoto was born in Hawaii.  He has a B.A. in Liberal Studies, Buddhism, from the University of Hawaii and was ordained the following year in Kyoto, Jodo Shinshu, Nishi Hongwanji.  He has had assignments in the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii and with Oakland and White River Buddhist Churches.  He has served the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin since 1986.  In his role as National Ministers Association Chair from 2001-2005, the following resolutions were approved: 1) noninterference by government of gay marriages, and 2) opposition to preemptive military action and war.  His current interests include photography, barbecue, woodworking, and aquaponics.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 206
  • Tuesday, Nov 10, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 27 and November 3, 10, 17 and December 1

    Location: Daly Science, Room 206

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course "The Truth That will Prevail" on Nov. 3*

    An interfaith group of religious leaders will explore a wide range of topics describing the similarities and differences among these great world religions – Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Zen Buddhism, and Buddhism.  These questions include: creation; why we exist; what/where is God; why we die and what happens after death; and how to balance tradition and modernity.  The speakers will also be asked to discuss three things not known about their religion and de-mystifying stereotypes.  The course will be moderated by previous OLLI@SCU instructor Rabbi Dana Magat
     
    The speakers are:
    Rabbi Magat (Judaism)—10/27
    Father Jon Pedigo (Catholicism)—11/3
    Iman Tahir Anwar (Islam)—11/10
    Jian Ying Shifu (from Zen Center of Sunnyvale)—11/17
    Rev. Gerald Sakamoto (Buddhism)—12/1
     
    Rabbi Dana Magat became Temple Emanu-El’s Senior Rabbi in July 1999.  Prior to that, he served four years as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Beth Israel in San Diego.  Rabbi Magat’s first pulpit was in Miami, where he was the Assistant Rabbi/Director of Education for Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Before his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1993, he earned a Masters in Education from the Fingerhut School of Education at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles.
     
    Rabbi Magat is actively involved in interfaith relations. He is the immediate past Chair of the Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice for Santa Clara County.  He also serves on the board of Chai House, Shalom Bayit, Northern California Board of Rabbis, and Home First.  He has served as President of the Cantors and Rabbis Association of Greater San Jose and has been a board member of Hillel of Silicon Valley, the Jewish Community Center, and the Pacific Association of American Rabbis.  Rabbi Magat has taught three classes for OLLI on Israel and Introduction to Judaism. 
     
    Father Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of northern California.  He has been active in civic affairs and social justice causes for over 30 years.  Since his ordination to the Diocese of San Jose in 1991, Father Pedigo has been involved with several local social justice causes and inter-faith dialogues.  He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, in the East Side of the city of San Jose; and he is currently the diocesan Director for Justice for Immigrants in the Diocese of San Jose.   Father Pedigo is a 2004 recipient of the Martin Luther King Good Neighbor Award and has been awarded the 2008 Immigrant Advocate of the Year by SIREN (Services, Immigrants Rights and Education Network); the 2010 Director’s Award from the Human Relations Commission of Santa Clara County; and the 2013 Cesar Chavez Social Justice Award from American Muslim Voice.  He is an Active PACT Clergy leader.  Fr. Pedigo also serves on the Sacred Heart Community Service Board, and on the Inter-Faith Council on Economics and Justice Board of Santa Clara County, as well as being a 2012 Rockwood Fellow for Immigrant Leaders in California.  Father Pedigo holds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University and a Master of Music from Indiana University, Bloomington.  He did his theology studies at St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park and holds a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from SCU’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley.
     
    Tahir Anwar is an Imam, a teacher, an activist, a husband, a father, and most importantly, a servant of Allah.  Born in London, England, he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1983.  Upon completing his religious studies in India, he has been serving as the Imam of one of the oldest masjids in the country, the Islamic Center of San Jose, since 2000.  After teaching middle school at one of the oldest Muslim schools in the country for 7 years, he is the founding board member of Averroes High School, the Bay Area’s first Muslim high school.  He teaches Islamic Law at the renowned Zaytuna College, America’s first Muslim liberal arts college in Berkeley.  He is currently the Chairman for the Board of NISA, North American Islamic Shelter for the Abused, an organization that works towards alleviating issues related to abuse and domestic violence.  NISA also runs a shelter for abused women in the Bay Area.  Mr. Anwar is also the founding board member of Islamic Art Exhibit, an annual traveling exhibit rooted in the Islamic tradition; and he sits on the Executive Committee for the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the country’s largest Muslim umbrella organization.  He has a passion for community service and has served on the Human Rights Commission for the City of San Jose for over 5 years, and the Human Relations Commission for the County of Santa Clara for one year. Mr. Anwar also leads a group for Hajj each year, which has been covered by CNN twice.
     
    Venerable JianYing  Shifu, Abbot, Chung Tai Zen Center of Sunnyvale,grew up in Taiwan and received two doctorate degrees in the U.S. --  a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, with a concentration in Buddhism, from Rice University.  He was ordained by Grand Master WeiChueh in 1998, later serving as a Vice Abbot at Chung Tai Chan Monastery.  In January 2012, the Grand Master appointed him Abbot of the Zen Center of Sunnyvale.  As a scholar and a practitioner, JianYing Shifu strives to bring theories and practices together.
     
    Gerald Sakamoto was born in Hawaii.  He has a B.A. in Liberal Studies, Buddhism, from the University of Hawaii and was ordained the following year in Kyoto, Jodo Shinshu, Nishi Hongwanji.  He has had assignments in the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii and with Oakland and White River Buddhist Churches.  He has served the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin since 1986.  In his role as National Ministers Association Chair from 2001-2005, the following resolutions were approved: 1) noninterference by government of gay marriages, and 2) opposition to preemptive military action and war.  His current interests include photography, barbecue, woodworking, and aquaponics.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 206
  • Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 27 and November 3, 10, 17 and December 1

    Location: Daly Science, Room 206

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course "The Truth That will Prevail" on Nov. 3*

    An interfaith group of religious leaders will explore a wide range of topics describing the similarities and differences among these great world religions – Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Zen Buddhism, and Buddhism.  These questions include: creation; why we exist; what/where is God; why we die and what happens after death; and how to balance tradition and modernity.  The speakers will also be asked to discuss three things not known about their religion and de-mystifying stereotypes.  The course will be moderated by previous OLLI@SCU instructor Rabbi Dana Magat
     
    The speakers are:
    Rabbi Magat (Judaism)—10/27
    Father Jon Pedigo (Catholicism)—11/3
    Iman Tahir Anwar (Islam)—11/10
    Jian Ying Shifu (from Zen Center of Sunnyvale)—11/17
    Rev. Gerald Sakamoto (Buddhism)—12/1
     
    Rabbi Dana Magat became Temple Emanu-El’s Senior Rabbi in July 1999.  Prior to that, he served four years as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Beth Israel in San Diego.  Rabbi Magat’s first pulpit was in Miami, where he was the Assistant Rabbi/Director of Education for Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Before his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1993, he earned a Masters in Education from the Fingerhut School of Education at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles.
     
    Rabbi Magat is actively involved in interfaith relations. He is the immediate past Chair of the Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice for Santa Clara County.  He also serves on the board of Chai House, Shalom Bayit, Northern California Board of Rabbis, and Home First.  He has served as President of the Cantors and Rabbis Association of Greater San Jose and has been a board member of Hillel of Silicon Valley, the Jewish Community Center, and the Pacific Association of American Rabbis.  Rabbi Magat has taught three classes for OLLI on Israel and Introduction to Judaism. 
     
    Father Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of northern California.  He has been active in civic affairs and social justice causes for over 30 years.  Since his ordination to the Diocese of San Jose in 1991, Father Pedigo has been involved with several local social justice causes and inter-faith dialogues.  He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, in the East Side of the city of San Jose; and he is currently the diocesan Director for Justice for Immigrants in the Diocese of San Jose.   Father Pedigo is a 2004 recipient of the Martin Luther King Good Neighbor Award and has been awarded the 2008 Immigrant Advocate of the Year by SIREN (Services, Immigrants Rights and Education Network); the 2010 Director’s Award from the Human Relations Commission of Santa Clara County; and the 2013 Cesar Chavez Social Justice Award from American Muslim Voice.  He is an Active PACT Clergy leader.  Fr. Pedigo also serves on the Sacred Heart Community Service Board, and on the Inter-Faith Council on Economics and Justice Board of Santa Clara County, as well as being a 2012 Rockwood Fellow for Immigrant Leaders in California.  Father Pedigo holds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University and a Master of Music from Indiana University, Bloomington.  He did his theology studies at St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park and holds a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from SCU’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley.
     
    Tahir Anwar is an Imam, a teacher, an activist, a husband, a father, and most importantly, a servant of Allah.  Born in London, England, he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1983.  Upon completing his religious studies in India, he has been serving as the Imam of one of the oldest masjids in the country, the Islamic Center of San Jose, since 2000.  After teaching middle school at one of the oldest Muslim schools in the country for 7 years, he is the founding board member of Averroes High School, the Bay Area’s first Muslim high school.  He teaches Islamic Law at the renowned Zaytuna College, America’s first Muslim liberal arts college in Berkeley.  He is currently the Chairman for the Board of NISA, North American Islamic Shelter for the Abused, an organization that works towards alleviating issues related to abuse and domestic violence.  NISA also runs a shelter for abused women in the Bay Area.  Mr. Anwar is also the founding board member of Islamic Art Exhibit, an annual traveling exhibit rooted in the Islamic tradition; and he sits on the Executive Committee for the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the country’s largest Muslim umbrella organization.  He has a passion for community service and has served on the Human Rights Commission for the City of San Jose for over 5 years, and the Human Relations Commission for the County of Santa Clara for one year. Mr. Anwar also leads a group for Hajj each year, which has been covered by CNN twice.
     
    Venerable JianYing  Shifu, Abbot, Chung Tai Zen Center of Sunnyvale,grew up in Taiwan and received two doctorate degrees in the U.S. --  a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, with a concentration in Buddhism, from Rice University.  He was ordained by Grand Master WeiChueh in 1998, later serving as a Vice Abbot at Chung Tai Chan Monastery.  In January 2012, the Grand Master appointed him Abbot of the Zen Center of Sunnyvale.  As a scholar and a practitioner, JianYing Shifu strives to bring theories and practices together.
     
    Gerald Sakamoto was born in Hawaii.  He has a B.A. in Liberal Studies, Buddhism, from the University of Hawaii and was ordained the following year in Kyoto, Jodo Shinshu, Nishi Hongwanji.  He has had assignments in the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii and with Oakland and White River Buddhist Churches.  He has served the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin since 1986.  In his role as National Ministers Association Chair from 2001-2005, the following resolutions were approved: 1) noninterference by government of gay marriages, and 2) opposition to preemptive military action and war.  His current interests include photography, barbecue, woodworking, and aquaponics.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 206
  • Tuesday, Dec 1, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, October 27 and November 3, 10, 17 and December 1

    Location: Daly Science, Room 206

    *Note: This course overlaps with the course "The Truth That will Prevail" on Nov. 3*

    An interfaith group of religious leaders will explore a wide range of topics describing the similarities and differences among these great world religions – Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Zen Buddhism, and Buddhism.  These questions include: creation; why we exist; what/where is God; why we die and what happens after death; and how to balance tradition and modernity.  The speakers will also be asked to discuss three things not known about their religion and de-mystifying stereotypes.  The course will be moderated by previous OLLI@SCU instructor Rabbi Dana Magat
     
    The speakers are:
    Rabbi Magat (Judaism)—10/27
    Father Jon Pedigo (Catholicism)—11/3
    Iman Tahir Anwar (Islam)—11/10
    Jian Ying Shifu (from Zen Center of Sunnyvale)—11/17
    Rev. Gerald Sakamoto (Buddhism)—12/1
     
    Rabbi Dana Magat became Temple Emanu-El’s Senior Rabbi in July 1999.  Prior to that, he served four years as Associate Rabbi at Congregation Beth Israel in San Diego.  Rabbi Magat’s first pulpit was in Miami, where he was the Assistant Rabbi/Director of Education for Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Before his ordination from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in 1993, he earned a Masters in Education from the Fingerhut School of Education at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles.
     
    Rabbi Magat is actively involved in interfaith relations. He is the immediate past Chair of the Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice for Santa Clara County.  He also serves on the board of Chai House, Shalom Bayit, Northern California Board of Rabbis, and Home First.  He has served as President of the Cantors and Rabbis Association of Greater San Jose and has been a board member of Hillel of Silicon Valley, the Jewish Community Center, and the Pacific Association of American Rabbis.  Rabbi Magat has taught three classes for OLLI on Israel and Introduction to Judaism. 
     
    Father Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of northern California.  He has been active in civic affairs and social justice causes for over 30 years.  Since his ordination to the Diocese of San Jose in 1991, Father Pedigo has been involved with several local social justice causes and inter-faith dialogues.  He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, in the East Side of the city of San Jose; and he is currently the diocesan Director for Justice for Immigrants in the Diocese of San Jose.   Father Pedigo is a 2004 recipient of the Martin Luther King Good Neighbor Award and has been awarded the 2008 Immigrant Advocate of the Year by SIREN (Services, Immigrants Rights and Education Network); the 2010 Director’s Award from the Human Relations Commission of Santa Clara County; and the 2013 Cesar Chavez Social Justice Award from American Muslim Voice.  He is an Active PACT Clergy leader.  Fr. Pedigo also serves on the Sacred Heart Community Service Board, and on the Inter-Faith Council on Economics and Justice Board of Santa Clara County, as well as being a 2012 Rockwood Fellow for Immigrant Leaders in California.  Father Pedigo holds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University and a Master of Music from Indiana University, Bloomington.  He did his theology studies at St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park and holds a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from SCU’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley.
     
    Tahir Anwar is an Imam, a teacher, an activist, a husband, a father, and most importantly, a servant of Allah.  Born in London, England, he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 1983.  Upon completing his religious studies in India, he has been serving as the Imam of one of the oldest masjids in the country, the Islamic Center of San Jose, since 2000.  After teaching middle school at one of the oldest Muslim schools in the country for 7 years, he is the founding board member of Averroes High School, the Bay Area’s first Muslim high school.  He teaches Islamic Law at the renowned Zaytuna College, America’s first Muslim liberal arts college in Berkeley.  He is currently the Chairman for the Board of NISA, North American Islamic Shelter for the Abused, an organization that works towards alleviating issues related to abuse and domestic violence.  NISA also runs a shelter for abused women in the Bay Area.  Mr. Anwar is also the founding board member of Islamic Art Exhibit, an annual traveling exhibit rooted in the Islamic tradition; and he sits on the Executive Committee for the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the country’s largest Muslim umbrella organization.  He has a passion for community service and has served on the Human Rights Commission for the City of San Jose for over 5 years, and the Human Relations Commission for the County of Santa Clara for one year. Mr. Anwar also leads a group for Hajj each year, which has been covered by CNN twice.
     
    Venerable JianYing  Shifu, Abbot, Chung Tai Zen Center of Sunnyvale,grew up in Taiwan and received two doctorate degrees in the U.S. --  a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, with a concentration in Buddhism, from Rice University.  He was ordained by Grand Master WeiChueh in 1998, later serving as a Vice Abbot at Chung Tai Chan Monastery.  In January 2012, the Grand Master appointed him Abbot of the Zen Center of Sunnyvale.  As a scholar and a practitioner, JianYing Shifu strives to bring theories and practices together.
     
    Gerald Sakamoto was born in Hawaii.  He has a B.A. in Liberal Studies, Buddhism, from the University of Hawaii and was ordained the following year in Kyoto, Jodo Shinshu, Nishi Hongwanji.  He has had assignments in the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawaii and with Oakland and White River Buddhist Churches.  He has served the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin since 1986.  In his role as National Ministers Association Chair from 2001-2005, the following resolutions were approved: 1) noninterference by government of gay marriages, and 2) opposition to preemptive military action and war.  His current interests include photography, barbecue, woodworking, and aquaponics.
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 206
Greater Phoenix National College Fair - Phoenix, AZ
GTU Administrative holiday / Library closed
Hans Boepple, Piano
  • Saturday, Oct 3, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Reknowned pianist and Music department chair Hans Boepple kicks off the season with his masterful playing. Tickets will go quickly for this; be sure to get yours today.


    Cost: $5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Hilo/East Hawai'i HACAC College Fair - Hilo, HI
Holiday Dinner
  • Thursday, Nov 19, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

     

    Join us for our annual Holiday Dinner.

    Date:  Thursday, November 19, 2015 
    Time: 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    Location: CA Mission Room, Benson Memorial Center
    Event:  Dinner and Entertainment
    Cost:  $45

      
    Dinner will be preceded by a social gathering. The dinner will take place in the beautiful California Mission Room, located in Benson Memorial Center, and is always a sell-out.

     


    Cost: 45.00
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
         Benson Memorial Center
Honolulu National College Fair - Honolulu, HI
Independence Day: Administrative holiday / Library closed
Indian Classical Music and Dance: Why, What and How of Current Performance Practice
  • Monday, Sep 28, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Monday, September 28 and October 5, 12

    Location:  Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    This course will introduce participants to the history and practice of Indian classical music and dance.  A course in cultural exposure and art appreciation, we will go over the why, what, and how of Indian performance practice.
    The classical music and dance traditions of India evolved over hundreds of years and represent the psyche of a refined form of national cultural expression.  Rooted in Indian philosophical thought and culture, the thoughts that are sung and danced to this day draw from India’s finest poetic works. Through use of live demonstration, videos, audio files, and translations of poetry, the course will detail the broad narratives explored, methods of voice training and body technique.  The course will also give a sneak peek into the dynamic music and dance of Bollywood films.
     
    Nirupama Vaidyanathan is a dancer, teacher and choreographer of Bharatanatyam, a South Indian classical dance form.  She has a Master’s degree in Communication from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.  She learned in India under acknowledged master teachers, Swamimalai  Rajarathnam and Kalanidhi Narayanan and continues to keep the dance traditions of her country alive in America.  Completing her solo dance debut at the age of twelve, Nirupama has performed over 300 solo dance recitals all over India, the U.S., and in Afghanistan.  She is the founding Artistic Director of Sankalpa School of dance in Fremont, where she trains youngsters in this art form.  Nirupama has choreographed and presented several full-length thematic and critically acclaimed dance productions through Sankalpa Dance Foundation, a non-profit that she founded.  Her essay on the poetry of Saint Meerabai of India and Saint Teresa of Avila is published in the volume of essays titled, Voyages of Body and Soul: Selected Female Icons of India and Beyond, published by Cambridge Publishing Group in India.  You can watch YouTube videos on her channel nirupama22.  
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Oct 5, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Monday, September 28 and October 5, 12

    Location:  Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    This course will introduce participants to the history and practice of Indian classical music and dance.  A course in cultural exposure and art appreciation, we will go over the why, what, and how of Indian performance practice.
    The classical music and dance traditions of India evolved over hundreds of years and represent the psyche of a refined form of national cultural expression.  Rooted in Indian philosophical thought and culture, the thoughts that are sung and danced to this day draw from India’s finest poetic works. Through use of live demonstration, videos, audio files, and translations of poetry, the course will detail the broad narratives explored, methods of voice training and body technique.  The course will also give a sneak peek into the dynamic music and dance of Bollywood films.
     
    Nirupama Vaidyanathan is a dancer, teacher and choreographer of Bharatanatyam, a South Indian classical dance form.  She has a Master’s degree in Communication from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.  She learned in India under acknowledged master teachers, Swamimalai  Rajarathnam and Kalanidhi Narayanan and continues to keep the dance traditions of her country alive in America.  Completing her solo dance debut at the age of twelve, Nirupama has performed over 300 solo dance recitals all over India, the U.S., and in Afghanistan.  She is the founding Artistic Director of Sankalpa School of dance in Fremont, where she trains youngsters in this art form.  Nirupama has choreographed and presented several full-length thematic and critically acclaimed dance productions through Sankalpa Dance Foundation, a non-profit that she founded.  Her essay on the poetry of Saint Meerabai of India and Saint Teresa of Avila is published in the volume of essays titled, Voyages of Body and Soul: Selected Female Icons of India and Beyond, published by Cambridge Publishing Group in India.  You can watch YouTube videos on her channel nirupama22.  
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Monday, Oct 12, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Monday, September 28 and October 5, 12

    Location:  Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151
     

    This course will introduce participants to the history and practice of Indian classical music and dance.  A course in cultural exposure and art appreciation, we will go over the why, what, and how of Indian performance practice.
    The classical music and dance traditions of India evolved over hundreds of years and represent the psyche of a refined form of national cultural expression.  Rooted in Indian philosophical thought and culture, the thoughts that are sung and danced to this day draw from India’s finest poetic works. Through use of live demonstration, videos, audio files, and translations of poetry, the course will detail the broad narratives explored, methods of voice training and body technique.  The course will also give a sneak peek into the dynamic music and dance of Bollywood films.
     
    Nirupama Vaidyanathan is a dancer, teacher and choreographer of Bharatanatyam, a South Indian classical dance form.  She has a Master’s degree in Communication from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.  She learned in India under acknowledged master teachers, Swamimalai  Rajarathnam and Kalanidhi Narayanan and continues to keep the dance traditions of her country alive in America.  Completing her solo dance debut at the age of twelve, Nirupama has performed over 300 solo dance recitals all over India, the U.S., and in Afghanistan.  She is the founding Artistic Director of Sankalpa School of dance in Fremont, where she trains youngsters in this art form.  Nirupama has choreographed and presented several full-length thematic and critically acclaimed dance productions through Sankalpa Dance Foundation, a non-profit that she founded.  Her essay on the poetry of Saint Meerabai of India and Saint Teresa of Avila is published in the volume of essays titled, Voyages of Body and Soul: Selected Female Icons of India and Beyond, published by Cambridge Publishing Group in India.  You can watch YouTube videos on her channel nirupama22.  
     

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
Information Session - Greenwich, CT
Information Session - Santa Monica, CA
Instruction Begins for Fall Semester 2015
Instruction begins for Spring Semester 2016
Intellectual Property: Understanding the Building Blocks of Silicon Valley
  • Saturday, Nov 14, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Saturday, November 14

    Location: Guadalupe Hall, Room 150/151

    This course is designed to provide a framework and general understanding of the various types of intellectual property protection that are available.  Topics covered include: patents, trademarks, copyright, trade secret, and sui generis intellectual property rights.  Participants should leave the class knowing a patent from a copyright.  Participants should also understand how IP is used to provide a competitive advantage in the marketplace for all types of businesses.
     
    Cecily Anne O’Regan, is an inventor, author, and registered patent attorney. She is currently the Chair of the Patent Prosecution Group at Shartsis Friese, LLP.  Cecily has presented on intellectual property at the University of San Francisco and Hult International Business School.  She has a B.S. from the University of California, Irvine, a J.D. from the University of San Francisco, and an LLM in Innovation Technology and the Law from the University of Edinburgh. 
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
International Alumni Reception
International School Fair - Beijing, China
  • Friday, Oct 23, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Rebecca (Becky) Konowicz, Director of International Admission

    Directions to Dulwich College Beijing, Legend Garden Campus

    Click here for map.

    89 Capital Airport Road
    Shunyi District
    Beijing 101300 PRC


    Location:
         Dulwich College Beijing, Legend Garden Campus
James Joyce's Ulysses, Part I
  • Wednesday, Oct 28, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location: Guadalupe Room 150/151

    Ulysses has been called "the most difficult of the entertaining novels, or is that vice-versa?"  It's also been said--often--that James Joyce's modernist masterpiece is a book that no one ever reads the first time, unless reading it in a class.  18 separate chapters, each one in a different style, with a different point of view, at a different hour, in the course of one day in modern Dublin:  Ulysses provides us with the portrait of a contemporary “Everyman,” in his bumbling, questioning, comic, and heroic adventures.  This course will cover the first third of the novel over a five-week period, and will be followed each quarter of this year by the remainder of the book.  Time to stretch out, read in some depth, and maybe even have one's life changed.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives, especially Mr. Harville’s.  
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Wednesday, Nov 4, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location: Guadalupe Room 150/151

    Ulysses has been called "the most difficult of the entertaining novels, or is that vice-versa?"  It's also been said--often--that James Joyce's modernist masterpiece is a book that no one ever reads the first time, unless reading it in a class.  18 separate chapters, each one in a different style, with a different point of view, at a different hour, in the course of one day in modern Dublin:  Ulysses provides us with the portrait of a contemporary “Everyman,” in his bumbling, questioning, comic, and heroic adventures.  This course will cover the first third of the novel over a five-week period, and will be followed each quarter of this year by the remainder of the book.  Time to stretch out, read in some depth, and maybe even have one's life changed.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives, especially Mr. Harville’s.  
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Wednesday, Nov 11, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location: Guadalupe Room 150/151

    Ulysses has been called "the most difficult of the entertaining novels, or is that vice-versa?"  It's also been said--often--that James Joyce's modernist masterpiece is a book that no one ever reads the first time, unless reading it in a class.  18 separate chapters, each one in a different style, with a different point of view, at a different hour, in the course of one day in modern Dublin:  Ulysses provides us with the portrait of a contemporary “Everyman,” in his bumbling, questioning, comic, and heroic adventures.  This course will cover the first third of the novel over a five-week period, and will be followed each quarter of this year by the remainder of the book.  Time to stretch out, read in some depth, and maybe even have one's life changed.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives, especially Mr. Harville’s.  
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Wednesday, Nov 18, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location: Guadalupe Room 150/151

    Ulysses has been called "the most difficult of the entertaining novels, or is that vice-versa?"  It's also been said--often--that James Joyce's modernist masterpiece is a book that no one ever reads the first time, unless reading it in a class.  18 separate chapters, each one in a different style, with a different point of view, at a different hour, in the course of one day in modern Dublin:  Ulysses provides us with the portrait of a contemporary “Everyman,” in his bumbling, questioning, comic, and heroic adventures.  This course will cover the first third of the novel over a five-week period, and will be followed each quarter of this year by the remainder of the book.  Time to stretch out, read in some depth, and maybe even have one's life changed.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives, especially Mr. Harville’s.  
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
  • Wednesday, Dec 2, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location: Guadalupe Room 150/151

    Ulysses has been called "the most difficult of the entertaining novels, or is that vice-versa?"  It's also been said--often--that James Joyce's modernist masterpiece is a book that no one ever reads the first time, unless reading it in a class.  18 separate chapters, each one in a different style, with a different point of view, at a different hour, in the course of one day in modern Dublin:  Ulysses provides us with the portrait of a contemporary “Everyman,” in his bumbling, questioning, comic, and heroic adventures.  This course will cover the first third of the novel over a five-week period, and will be followed each quarter of this year by the remainder of the book.  Time to stretch out, read in some depth, and maybe even have one's life changed.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives, especially Mr. Harville’s.  
     

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Guadalupe Hall
         Room 150/151
January Intersession Begins
January Intersession Ends
Japanese Woodblock Prints, Part I: The Floating World (1615 - 1868)
  • Monday, Oct 12, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 12 and 19

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241
     

    Woodblock prints are perhaps the best-known examples of Japanese visual art in the West, as they were a key source of inspiration for many European Impressionist painters in the mid-nineteenth century.  Characterized by their vivid colors and lively designs, these prints first emerged within the thriving culture of Edo Period Japan (1615-1868).  Known as ukiyo-e or “pictures of the floating world,” they initially depicted the fleeting pleasures of urban entertainment such as Kabuki and beautiful women, but later expanded to include a range of themes.  This course provides an introduction to the genre, surveying traditional print subjects and tracing the development of the medium through the mid-19th century. Topics discussed will include the printmaking process, courtesan prints, theater prints, and landscapes.
     
    Karen M. Fraser is an Assistant Professor in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.  Her research focuses on modern Japanese visual culture (particularly photography); women in Japanese visual culture; and cross-cultural interactions and influences between Asia and the West.  She attended the University of Miami as an undergraduate and received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Art History.  Karen offered a short OLLI@SCU course, covering some of the material in Part I of this course, last spring.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
  • Monday, Oct 19, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 12 and 19

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241
     

    Woodblock prints are perhaps the best-known examples of Japanese visual art in the West, as they were a key source of inspiration for many European Impressionist painters in the mid-nineteenth century.  Characterized by their vivid colors and lively designs, these prints first emerged within the thriving culture of Edo Period Japan (1615-1868).  Known as ukiyo-e or “pictures of the floating world,” they initially depicted the fleeting pleasures of urban entertainment such as Kabuki and beautiful women, but later expanded to include a range of themes.  This course provides an introduction to the genre, surveying traditional print subjects and tracing the development of the medium through the mid-19th century. Topics discussed will include the printmaking process, courtesan prints, theater prints, and landscapes.
     
    Karen M. Fraser is an Assistant Professor in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.  Her research focuses on modern Japanese visual culture (particularly photography); women in Japanese visual culture; and cross-cultural interactions and influences between Asia and the West.  She attended the University of Miami as an undergraduate and received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Art History.  Karen offered a short OLLI@SCU course, covering some of the material in Part I of this course, last spring.
     

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
Japanese Woodblock Prints, Part II: The Modern Age (late 19th and early 20thC)
  • Monday, Oct 26, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241
     
    *Note: This course overlaps with the course China in Revolution*

    After two and a half centuries of self-imposed isolation, Japan began to open up in the 1850’s, following the arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry and his “Black Ships.” New interactions with the U.S. and Europe led to a dynamic period of rapid modernization. Artists continued to work in the traditional medium of woodblock prints, but the subjects and styles evolved in tandem with the dramatic cultural changes taking place.  This  course provides an overview of Japanese history in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, via print imagery.  Topics will include Yokohama prints, the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese Wars, and the twentieth century “New Print” and “Creative Print” movements. This course is intended as a follow-up to Japanese Woodblock Prints, Part I, though students may also take only Part II.
     
    Karen M. Fraser is an Assistant Professor in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.  Her research focuses on modern Japanese visual culture (particularly photography); women in Japanese visual culture; and cross-cultural interactions and influences between Asia and the West.  She attended the University of Miami as an undergraduate and received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Art History.  Karen offered a short OLLI@SCU course, covering some of the material in Part I of this course, last spring.
     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
  • Monday, Nov 2, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, October 26 and November 2

    Location: Bannan Hall, Room 241
     
    *Note: This course overlaps with the course China in Revolution*

    After two and a half centuries of self-imposed isolation, Japan began to open up in the 1850’s, following the arrival of Commodore Matthew Perry and his “Black Ships.” New interactions with the U.S. and Europe led to a dynamic period of rapid modernization. Artists continued to work in the traditional medium of woodblock prints, but the subjects and styles evolved in tandem with the dramatic cultural changes taking place.  This  course provides an overview of Japanese history in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, via print imagery.  Topics will include Yokohama prints, the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese Wars, and the twentieth century “New Print” and “Creative Print” movements. This course is intended as a follow-up to Japanese Woodblock Prints, Part I, though students may also take only Part II.
     
    Karen M. Fraser is an Assistant Professor in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.  Her research focuses on modern Japanese visual culture (particularly photography); women in Japanese visual culture; and cross-cultural interactions and influences between Asia and the West.  She attended the University of Miami as an undergraduate and received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in Art History.  Karen offered a short OLLI@SCU course, covering some of the material in Part I of this course, last spring.
     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 241
Jesuit Experience Tour College Fair - Denver, CO
Job Search Lab
  • Tuesday, Oct 27, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

     - Customize your job search using the fastest growing job search engines on the web 

    - Set up searches on BroncoLink that yield results

    - Learn strategies for boosting the number of targeted jobs arriving in your inbox daily


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
JST Community Mass & Soup Supper
  • Tuesday, Sep 15, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Sep 22, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Sep 29, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Oct 6, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Oct 13, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Oct 20, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Nov 3, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Nov 10, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Nov 24, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Dec 1, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Dec 8, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Dec 15, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Jan 5, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Jan 12, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Jan 19, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Jan 26, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Feb 2, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Feb 9, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Feb 16, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Feb 23, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Mar 1, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Mar 8, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
  • Tuesday, Mar 15, 2016 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper. Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following. All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology