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Story in the College of Arts & Sciences

Dindia photo

Christine Dindia '00, '03

Communication major, Environmental Science major
At a glance:

An alumna's passion for education takes her from SCU to Africa and back

It's often said that education is a gateway to the world. This is undoubtedly true for Christine Dindia '00 '03, whose passion for learning has encompassed two undergraduate degrees; leading experiential education expeditions in Alaska, Canada, and the Caribbean; and teaching in Somaliland, Africa.

After graduating from SCU in 2000 with a degree in communications, she worked at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and came back to campus to get a science degree. "I decided I wanted to explore a career in marine biology and environmental conservation," she says. Working toward the second bachelor's degree, she was employed at the Environmental Studies Institute, a position that led to a fellowship with The Nature Conservancy where she did research on coastal fish populations.

Shortly after, Dindia began a career working in non-profits, including fundraising for the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and the Diocese of San Jose.

In August 2010, she had a calling to dive deeper into those values of "service to humanity and solidarity with those who are less fortunate." She spent a year at a boarding school, Abaarso Tech, in Somaliland, where she taught high school-age students reading comprehension and writing as well as coached soccer and track teams. It is her dream to see her students admitted to SCU and afforded the same opportunities she was in college.

Shortly after returning to the states, hoping to bridge her non-profit experience and passion for education, Dindia found herself at SCU for a third time, now as the director of marketing and special projects for the School of Education and Counseling Psychology. And with the school's growing focus on international education, she might wind up preparing students for globetrotting journeys formations of their own.