What’s your story?

What’s your story?
Photo by Charles Barry
by Steven Boyd Saum |
A thank-you. A request. And 100,000 reasons to go in for SCU on April 23.

Let’s start with this: Everybody savors a good story. Maybe it’s told in a single photo of a face in profile (worth 1,000 words, right?) or a tale of a scientist who saved a child’s life, a student who helped free an innocent man from prison, a brilliant young woman just out of college and ready to rock the world with her startup, a humble priest and scholar whose teaching and advising and ministry blessed this place for half a century, and how many stories are intertwined with his? Stories that leave you inspired or breathless or amazed, saying, How cool is that!

Stories about Santa Clara University—the place and the people who keep it living, breathing, growing—are what shape Santa Clara Magazine. Four times a year, the magazine reaches more than 90,000 readers in print. Through the digital magazine, which includes new stories every week, the Santa Clara story reaches around the world. All that’s made possible through support from folks like you.

So, thank you.
 

Looking for a reason? Here are 100,000.

One day of giving: It's all about the power of one—read more and help sustain the things you believe in.

Then there’s this: A gift to the magazine, no matter the size, helps ensure that we can tell stories with breadth and depth, through writing and images that are lively and compelling. And here’s a reason—actually, 100,000 reasons—to make a small gift to support the mag or your favorite project and program at SCU on April 23: If 1,001 Santa Clara grads make a gift to the University on that very day, thoughtful and generous Julie Robson ’83 and Mark Robson ’84 will donate another $100,000. Here’s the headline for the date: The Power of One Day.

Last year in Santa Clara Magazine, we took you on an epic journey with “Walk Across California.” We asked some big questions, like, “Yes, but is it the right thing to do?”—a phrase that has shaped the largest university-based ethics center in the world. (That would be right here on the Mission Campus.) In our spring edition, just out, we take you to Myanmar and Afghanistan, and we look at what the Dalai Lama had to say here in Silicon Valley to business leaders and students and thousands more. A hint: It’s about compassion and ethics.

Thanks again to all of you who sustain this magazine. Will you help us tell Santa Clara’s stories in the months ahead? Make a gift online. Read more about the Power of One Day: All in for SCU. Send us your idea for a story. And post an update for Class Notes (with a photo, if you like) on what you’ve been doing. The folks in the Santa Clara community like to hear the individual stories, great and small, that shape our ongoing tale.

We know that there are far more than 1,001 stories to tell. Even a lot more than 100,000.

Keep the faith,

Steven Boyd Saum
Editor 

Ron Hansen
Literary Editor,
Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Professor of Arts and Humanities

 

* * *

Story update on April 24, 2014: Here’s a nice surprise: For the Power of One Day, more than 2,800 fans of Santa Clara stories big and small chipped in. Which meant hitting the goal for the first challenge gift and a second challenge gift for another $100,000 made by a 1969 grad who would prefer to remain anonymous. And which will feed and water the stories that sprout in all sorts of interesting places around this campus, and where the students and scholars and makers go out into the world. So, thanks again.

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Summer 2014

Table of contents

Features

A day with the Dalai Lama

High-spirited and hushed moments from Feb. 24: a day to talk about business, ethics, compassion.

The Catholic writer today

Poet and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts Dana Gioia argues that Catholic writers must renovate and reoccupy their own tradition.

Our stories and the theatre of awe

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Marilynne Robinson speaks about grace, discernment, and being a modern believer.

Mission Matters

What would the next generation say?

Hossam Baghat, one of Egypt’s leading human rights activists, was awarded the 2014 Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize for his work defending human rights.

Breaking records on the maplewood

Scoring 40 points in one game. And besting Steve Nash’s freshman year.

How's the water?

A lab on a chip helps provide the answer—which is a matter of life and death when the question is whether drinking water contains arsenic.