Law at 100

enrolled, with more than 40 percent of them representing ethnic minorities—making the law school one of the most diverse in the country. Last year, law school students racked up more than 11,000 hours of pro bono legal work. They were completing juris doctor degrees and graduate degrees in international law and intellectual property law, or perhaps a combined J.D./MBA or J.D. paired with a master’s of science in information systems. Or maybe they were earning a certificate in intellectual property law (at one of the top schools for IP law in the nation), international law, or public interest and social justice law.

On the pages that follow, we bring you snapshots of the law school in transformation during the course of a century. And a few writers, including Santa Clara legal scholars and a chronicler of Silicon Valley, look at how some aspects of the law itself have changed during that same period of time—from high tech and intellectual property to international criminal law, from gender equality to freeing the innocent from prison. 

"The Big Idea!"Michael S. Malone '71, MBA '77 looks at the life of the mind, Silicon Valley gold, and gives a brief history of intellectual property law.

"Women's work" — Jobs, the law, and a century of redefining "differences." Legal Scholar Stephanie M. Wildman offers a take on the big picture.

"Altruism v. Apathy" — Making the case for international criminal law—from Nuremberg to Yugoslavia and into the 21st century. Beth Van Schaack draws on lessons learned firsthand and across the globe.

"Until proven innocent" — For a decade, the Northern California Innocence Project has made its reputation by exonerating the wrongfully convicted. John Deever reports on two recent prosecutorial misconduct reports.

So read on—and later this summer, find links to more extensive coverage of the law school centennial (and alumni, and faculty, and deans) in the summer edition of Santa Clara Law Magazine.

For those of you who prefer your words in print but aren’t law school grads: Request a copy of that special issue, due out this summer, from Mary Short in the Law Alumni Office: mjshort@scu.edu or 408-551-1748.
Steven Boyd Saum |

When the School of Law at Santa Clara College opened its doors in September 1911, it was a rather modest affair: There were two lectures a day (at 2:30 p.m. and 7:15 p.m.), three law classes, and four part-time faculty—three of them judges. The course of study leavened theory with some good-ol' American emphasis on practice; it was open to college graduates as well as men with at least two years of undergrad schooling, with programs extended to “gifted young men ... [in] possession of a legal mind.”

However, this wasn’t the beginning of law being taught at Santa Clara. For a few years already, there had been instruction in elementary law, an area of study seen as a natural fit for a Jesuit college with an emphasis on teaching ethics. But opening the law school was a step toward transforming the college into “a great Catholic University,” as then-President James P. Morrissey, S.J., described the aspirations.

Opening the law school was a step toward transforming the college into
“a great Catholic University.”

As for that beginning: Members of the first class of law school grads included Roy A. Bronson, who co-founded a 200-lawyer San Francisco firm; Frank B. Boone, who served with the Interallied Food Commission in Paris; Christopher A. Degnan and Harry McGowan, both district attorneys; and Dion R. Holm, a San Francisco city attorney. So it’s fair to say that the law school earned early on a slogan it adopted years later, and carries today: lawyers who lead.

As the law school approaches the beginning of its second century, a few statistics illuminate the legal educational landscape on the Mission Campus: More than 900 students are

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