Santa Clara Magazine

For the Alumni and Friends of Santa Clara University

rss icon

CLASS NOTE PRINT DEADLINES

Share your latest news with fellow Broncos in the print edition of Santa Clara Magazine. For the Fall 2014 edition, get your note in by June 1. Notes for the Summer 2014 edition were due by March 1.

 

Class Notes | Obituaries

Submit a Class Note or Obituary »

Showing obituaries submitted in the last year by graduates in 1985

1985

UGRD Arts & Sciences '85
Thomas J. Bahr

Thomas J. Bahr ’85, a resident of Mountain View, passed away on April 21, 2013, after a reoccurrence of brain cancer first diagnosed 25 years ago. Born on August 12, 1963, he leaves behind loving parents Alfred and Caroline Bahr and sister Anne Bahr-Katarincic. Before his illness he was active in a group devoted to the music and dance of his Croatian heritage and graduated from Santa Clara University in 1985 with a degree in science and math. Limited by the disability suffered as a result of his affliction he was never able to work in this field, but he managed to go back to school to pursue his real passion, graphic design. He received certificates in graphic design and production in 1995 and 1996. He produced a legacy of a large number of high-quality digital art pieces that will be cherished by his family. 

submitted Jul. 19, 2013 4:21P
'85
Rudolph G. Kraft

Rudolph G. Kraft Jr. M.A. ’85 received his SCU degree in marriage, family and child counseling. The knowledge from attaining this degree assisted him as a family law attorney. He died August 10, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. Born on August 4, 1929 in Philadelphia, Penn., he was raised in Longmeadow, Mass. by his late parents, Rita H. and Rudolph G. Kraft. He graduated from Classical High School, Springfield, Mass/, as well as from Cornell University and Cornell Law School. Rudolph served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and remained in the Air Force Reserve for over 20 years. He practiced law in San Jose, Calif. until his retirement. He is survived by his wife, Lorna Gillio; his children, Rudolph Kraft III, Terence Kraft, Maggie Kraft and Kathleen Kraft. He was predeceased by a son, Paul Kraft in 2003; his stepchildren Sherril Wunder, Gregory Hurd; brothers, James Kraft of Old Chatham, N.Y. and Frank Kraft of West Suffield, Conn.; along with six grandchildren, four step-grandchildren and two step-great grandchildren.

 

 

submitted Jan. 9, 2014 11:14A
GRD Ed./Couns Psych./Pastoral Min. '85
Edna "Teddy" Marie Pescatore Renzullo

Edna (Teddy) Marie Pescatore Renzullo M.A. ’85  passed away on June 8th, 2013 in Yuba City, Calif. Her love and caring for her students will be missed by all. Edna was born in Torrington, Conn. November 27, 1940. She attended Seaton Hall University in N.J. and later obtained a Masters of Education from Santa Clara University in Calif. She was a teacher for over 40 years. The last 28 were at Saint Isidore's Catholic School in Yuba City. She is survived by her loving husband of 40 years, Ivilo "Mike" Renzullo, her son, Chris Renzullo (Jodi) her granddaughters, Gillian and Lauren of Yuba City, CA brothers, Michael (Lorraine) of Florida and Richard (Lilly) of Connecticut and many nieces and nephews. When Edna was not in the classroom teaching, you could find her bowling, playing cards, or supporting her grandchildren in their various endeavors. 

submitted Jul. 23, 2013 10:59A
GRD Law '85
David J. Osborne

David J. Osborne J.D. ’85, June 3, 2013. Dave was in the middle of a jury trial. He was in the midst of defending a client against charges of child abuse. Dave was a public defender, appointed by the Court to defend the most despised in our society. He gave his life to and for his clients. He defended and saved the lives of many of our citizens. He was most proud that he convinced a jury to spare the life of one man who the state was trying to execute. David James Osborne was born on April 1, 1956 to James and Katie Osborne in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is survived by his only sister, Jane Frydenlund, of Floodwood, Minnesota. He loved miniature trains as a boy. One of his granddads had been an engineer. His dad was managing editor of the Grand Rapids newspaper. His mom, Katie, had been one of its first female reporters. She quit so that she could raise Jane and Dave. Dave went to a ""free school"" and never graduated from high school. He was proud of his GED and displayed it proudly on his law office wall. He was proud of his clear and cogent writing which he credited to his parents and their life of letters. Dave's best friends in Grand Rapids, Michigan were Kimbo and Jim Reed. In 1980, he graduated from Michigan State University, a student of philosophy and political science. In 1981, he moved to California, with his sweetheart, Diane Meconis. She was accepted into the Hastings School of Law at University of California in San Francisco. Dave got a job at The College Avenue Burrito Shop. A year later, he was accepted into the University of Santa Clara School of Law. He said he wasn't smart enough to get into Hastings, so he went to Santa Clara, with one of his best friends, David Michmerhuizen, who moved out from Michigan to live with him. When I was told by my girlfriend not to bother coming home, Dave offered his couch. When his next door neighbor, Ben O'Mahoney, had his apartment burned by his crazy roommate, Osborne, O'Mahoney, Michmerhuizen and I all moved to a locked, iron door neighborhood in downtown San Jose. That house, or the mattresses where the people lived below it, caught fire. The fire started, perhaps, by firecrackers thrown in the floor heater, investigated by fire inspector Piper, continued to spark Dave's fascination with explosives. Osborne barely survived first year final exams after catching double pneumonia. I finally took him to a doctor for antibiotics. He eventually moved with me to Felton, California. We lived with a fellow, Randall G. Binks, III, also known as White Cloud. Dr. Michael Freeman of Ben Lomond would commute with Osborne to law school that year and became his friend. In 1985, his last home during law school was a cottage in San Jose behind the house of Doug Bird and Stewart Wilson, lawyers with the Legal Aid Society of Santa Clara County. They also volunteered for The National Lawyers' Guild. Dave helped found the University of Santa Clara County Chapter of The National Lawyers' Guild. The Lawyers' Guild at that time observed and represented protestors arrested during Presidential campaigns of the day. A few months before he died, he planned with me to establish a National Lawyer Guild Chapter in Redding to advocate for Native Americans here. Dave's next love was a radical lawyer in San Jose, Constance Carpenter. He loved her passion for justice, her crazy ways, her celebrations of life and love of tequila. Her law partners, Dan Mayfield and Jeff Lake J.D. ’92 were his good friends. Somehow, Dave graduated from the University of Santa Clara School of Law. He loved Ed Steinman's Civil Procedure and Alan Sheflin M.A. ’87's Forensic Persuasion classes. His photographic memory and razor sharp intellect somehow substituted for class and study, and Dave graduated from the University of Santa Clara School of Law and passed the California Bar exam. He followed me up to Redding, California to work for Frank J. O'Connor, the Shasta County Public Defender. Steven C. Kennedy, Bob Willie, Greg Parker, Brian McNally, Erin O'Toole McNally, Gary Roberts, Daphne Wilson, Bill Malloy, Doug Gardner and Jeff Gorder J.D. ’84 all worked with him at the office. Gary Roberts once accused him of stomping on Gary's toe. Dave enjoyed playing practical jokes on Gary, sending envelopes with white powder and wrapping Gary's porch with crime scene tape. Gary said Dave Osborne was one of the three reasons he left Shasta County. After Frank O'Connor left the Public Defender's office, he and Dave Osborne then shared an office across the street from the courthouse for many years. Dave loved Berkeley, the Mediterranean CafT, the record stores. He loved Oakland and Mama's Royal CafT. He loved San Francisco and the Schezuan Restaurant. He fantasized about moving back, going back to college to study Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern studies. He wanted my wife, Monica, to find him a mosque in Chico where he would be welcome. He loved the beauty of the Koran. In earlier years, Dave dug African history and music: King Sunni Ade in the 1980s and Ali Farke Toure and Hugh Masekela in the 1990s. He always appreciated guitar, especially Leo Kottke. He himself played the bass. He loved to play and listen to Motown like The Temptations or The Neville Brothers and The Wild Tchoupitoulas. Of course, he loved the Reggae music of Bob Marley and the Wailers and Toots and the Maytals. Twenty years ago, I would often find Dave after work at the Squire Room having a beer with buddies, John Webster and Frank O'Connor. Dave loved and doted on his friends' children, Corbin, the son of his best friend, Rich, Mary Ellen, the daughter of his sister, Jane, and especially Savannah, his God-daughter, my daughter. He wanted us to dedicate a room in our home so that he could build a huge train track and train set for our kids. We never got a chance. He often shopped for these kids and thought of them and tried to imagine what kinds of things they might like. He collected Barbies, and went shopping for Barbies, and had Barbies at his home that he never had a chance to give to my daughters before he died. After moving to Redding in 1986, he found a new true love, Christy Zink. She was a park ranger and Fish and Game warden. They lived together on the Sacramento River, his friend John Webster living in a cottage on the property, where they brewed beer. After that he lived with Al Myrtle, and became involved in Kenpo karate with Scott Halsey and his best friend, Rich. Dave used to love to tell stories, funny stories about himself and others. He never lost the relish for repeating these. He loved to tell about the one time that he met my dad when my dad showed up with a T-shirt that said ""Get a lot of the beach while you're young!"". In his last ten years, his secretary, Sharon Rader, became like a sister, and a mom, to him. He complained constantly to her about his health, but seldom saw a doctor or changed his habits. She cursed him daily after his death. Dave's mother, Katie Osborne, lived into her 90s. She died just a few years ago. She would continue to come and visit him for several weeks each year, until she broke her hip, and could no longer tangle with Dave's huge dogs. Dave lived for these visits each year with his mom, complained about them, complaining that he would have to get his house clean and presentable for her visits. His mom would tell Dave that she wasn't buying any green bananas. 


Every Christmas, he would fly to be with his mom and his sister to Grand Rapids, to Brownsville, to Virginia, to Minnesota. Osborne loved the music festivals in Northern California. He loved to camp all weekend in the fairgrounds while drum circles play all night, people sold acid outside his tent flap, youngsters offered to buy his fried eggs, or sell him sticky balls or ganga spaghetti. He looked forward to another summer of Reggae-on-the- River and the World Music Festival in Grass Valley. Dave loved to backpack with me and Frank O'Connor in the Trinity Alps. Dave's poor health slowly caused him to postpone and only dream. He never gave up dreaming of doing these things that he loved.

submitted Jul. 22, 2013 5:18P

Search all notes/obituaries: