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Class Notes | Obituaries

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Showing obituaries submitted in the last year by graduates in 1973

1973

GRD Law '73
William F. Caro

William F. Caro '54, J.D. '73. Feb. 26, 2014. Born in San Jose in 1932, Caro inherited his father's devotion to SCU's fabled football history and loved to recount, play-by-play, Santa Clara's heartbreaking 7-6 loss to Stanford in the very first college game he ever attended, as an eight-year-old, on Oct. 12, 1940. Athletic loyalties notwithstandng, he did graduate work at Stanford, earning his M.B.A. in 1960 with an emphasis in marketing. His subsequent career as an advertising media director brought him to agencies in San Francisco and Los Angees and Eventually to Coakley-Heagerty in Santa Clara. He later taught advertising at San Jose State University. Caro spent his retirement years in Santa Clara, not far from where the palm and olive mingle. He occasionally enjoyed an idle hour in the university library researching the glory days of Bronco football. He is survived by his brothers, Robert, S.J. '58, M.Div '70 and Paul '62.

submitted Mar. 25, 2014 10:43P
'73
Thomas W. Cain

For more than two decades, Judge Thomas W. Cain '70, J.D. '73 stayed one step ahead of cancer as the disease ravaged his body, all while overseeing some of Silicon Valley's most colorful estate cases. But after 27 surgeries and multiple rounds of chemotherapy and radiation, the popular Santa Clara County Superior Court judge succumbed on Jan. 11, 2014, at age 65.

At Cain's request, no memorial service will be held. Instead, he asked friends and colleagues to honor his memory by performing a random act of kindness.
"Tom was a great person," Presiding Judge Brian C. Walsh said in a written statement. "He was uncomplainingly helpful to all of his colleagues," and known for "his indelible spirit, optimism and kindness."
 
In his 24 years on the bench, Cain never put in for a particular judicial assignment, such as criminal courts or probate, as most judges do. Instead, he'd always write on the annual request form, "Where ever the presiding judge needs me," Walsh said.
 
Recently, Cain presided over two high-profile probate cases. One was the dispute over Monte Sereno millionaire Ravi Kumra's estate after he was slain in a botched robbery at his mansion. The other was the showdown between painter Thomas Kinkade's estranged wife and his live-in girlfriend. The women in the Kinkade matter wound up reaching a secret settlement. In the Kumra case, Cain ruled that two school-age daughters of a former prostitute not connected to his slaying were, in fact, Kumra's biological children and entitled to a monthly family allowance.
 
Cain was appointed by Gov. George Deukmejian in late 1989 after working as a lawyer in the Santa Clara County Counsel's Office. But he didn't just preside over legal cases. He also helped decide cooking competitions long before the Food Network made such contests popular. As a certified "Kansas City Barbecue Judge," he judged the "Jack Daniels' World Invitational Barbecue Competition" in Lynchburg, Tenn.
 
An avid cook, the judge also won an award from Sunset magazine for his salmon recipe. The magazine published the judge's recipe for oven-baked "Oriental Fish and Chips" in the August 1996 edition, complimenting him for his "striking presentation" of "potato-encrusted fish with a confetti of red and yellow bell peppers topped with steamed asparagus spears brushed with olive oil and browned under the broiler." "Cooking was his passion," his sister Pat Thompson said.
 
Cain was born in Maryland in 1948 and moved to San Jose with his family in 1956. He was the oldest of three children and the only boy. Elected class president at one point, he decided at an early age to become a lawyer, Thompson said.
 
"You never wanted to play Monopoly with him because he could B.S. his way through anything, which is important for being a lawyer," she said.
 
Last year, he received an award for outstanding service to the probate bar from by the Silicon Valley Bar Association. During his career, he also served as an instructor at Lincoln University School of Law and guest instructor in Southern Russia in a program sponsored by the American Bar Association.
Cain loved sports, so much so that he'd watch soccer even if it was broadcast on a foreign language station. He also attended spring training in Arizona for the Giants and the A's every season.
 
He died Saturday at his Willow Glen home, surrounded by his family. He is survived by wife Terri (who recently retired as director of court services), son Josh and daughter Alessandra '14 (and their mother, judge Vanessa Zecher B.A. '84, J.D. '87); sisters Pat and Jan, mother Mary Jane; stepchildren Anthony, Troy and Sara and grandchildren Elsa, Madica, Taylor and Dylan.
 
At Cain’s request, instead of a memorial service, he asked friends and colleagues to honor his memory by performing a random act of kindness.  The family requests that in lieu of flowers, a contribution to his memory be made to Optimal Hospice in Santa Clara.  Any sympathy notes may be sent to Campus Ministry which will be forwarded to the family.
submitted Jan. 16, 2014 10:29A
'73
Milton Crane

Milton Crane MBA ’73, October 22, 2013. He died in Sparks, Nev. Milton was born in New York to Charlotte and Louis Cohen. He enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and was trained as an Aviation Electronic Tech Third Class served until June 1946. He was awarded both the Victory Medal & American Theatre Medal. He was able to attend college on the GI Bill at Cal Poly Tech. in San Luis Obispo, CA, Stanford and the University of Santa Clara. He met his wife Jean at Stanford and they were married in September of 1961. Milton was an electronics engineer for Lockheed Corp in California and Arizona. Milton is survived by his son, Matthew, daughter Gretchen (Michael) de la Torre, granddaughters Mia, Emma, and his sister Barbara (Carl) Parducci. The family would like to express their gratitude to the staff at The Cascades of the Sierra in Sparks, NV. Even though he had been there a short time, the care and compassion shown to him was wonderful and made a big impact on his final days.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 10:21P
'73
Mark McCambridge

Mark McCambridge '73, Jan. 16, 2014.

The former vice president for finance and administration at Oregon State University died in his home from “a long and courageous battle with cancer,” according to an email from OSU President Ray and Provost Sabah Randhawa. McCambridge retired in July 2013 after 20 years at OSU. He was 62 with two children.  McCambridge, who was born in Seattle and graduated from Santa Clara University, joined OSU in 1994 as director of business services. Before being named VP of finance and administration in 2001, he held several positions at OSU.  In 2013, McCambridge received the Honorary Alumni Award and the Distinguished Service Award, one of OSU’s highest honors. He was well-liked and respected by colleagues and friends. “We lost a remarkable individual,” said Kavinda Arthenayake, director of University Conference Services in the LaSells Stewart Center. Arthenayake knew McCambridge for more than 10 years. When they worked together, McCambridge was Arthenayake’s direct supervisor. 

McCambridge’s impact went beyond just the workplace. Arthenayake said McCambridge made an effort to know everyone as an individual and would reach out to people’s families. McCambridge developed a bond with Arthenayake’s 14-year-old daughter, Lauren, who met McCambridge when she was 6 years old. When Lauren discovered McCambridge had cancer, she started baking him cookies. One birthday, she baked McCambridge’s cake.
 
“This is how (McCambridge) touched the lives of other individuals,” Arthenayake said. Arthenayake spoke fondly of McCambridge, describing him as a mentor and the “most considerate individual he has ever met.”
Arthenayake said McCambridge built meaningful relationships and went beyond to help those around him succeed. Ray and McCambridge built a close friendship, and Ray said he helped shape several aspects of the university.
 
“Mark McCambridge was a very special friend of mine,” Ray said in a press release. “And he was a great friend of many, many people at Oregon State University, within higher education in Oregon and throughout the Corvallis community. He will be sorely missed and fondly remembered.”

McCambridge also helped the university achieve fourth place in the nation for use of renewable energy.  Brandon Trelstad, sustainability coordinator, worked with McCambridge on making the university a greener campus. Trelstad said McCambridge played a particular role in helping OSU achieve its recognizable status as a leader in sustainability.

McCambridge is survived by his wife, Betsy McCambridge ’74, his son, Mark McCambridge Jr., his daughter and son-in-law Kelly and Jason Hower, and his grandchildren, Patrick and Molly Hower.

submitted Apr. 22, 2014 8:53P
'73
Joyce Ardell Jackson

Joyce Ardell Jackson '73: 1947-2013 Joyce Ardell Jackson departed this life on Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013, in San Pedro, Calif., following a decades-long struggle with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Born June 2, 1947, in Berkeley, California, she was a spirited youngster, adventurous and friendly. At the age of 12, she contracted arthritis, a defining period in her life. Over the years she faced many challenges because of her condition, enduring more than 50 operations. Yet she rarely succumbed to self-pity. At one point she even called herself "The Bionic Woman," a moniker she had borrowed from a popular 1970s TV series.

After attending public schools in Oakland and Hayward, Calif., Joyce attended Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif., graduating in 1973. Determined to be independent, she worked for a number of firms in the Bay Area, including McDonnell Douglas, British Telecommunications, The San Jose Mercury News, and Community Resources for Independent Living. At times, she found it necessary to juggle two part-time jobs with her full-time job.

Earlier in her career, soon after accepting a position with the Center for Independent Living (CIL) in Berkeley, California, Joyce began a second defining period in her life.  In April of 1977, she took part in a disability rights sit-in organized by people with disabilities.  Joining some 150 severely disabled demonstrators and their supporters, the protestors occupied the Federal Building for nearly a month at the San Francisco regional offices of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), defying federal and local officials.
 
As part of the Demonstration Joyce was one of twenty activists who went to Washington DC to meet with Carter administration officials.  While in DC, the activists convinced HEW officials to implement Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act-- the landmark civil rights legislation banning discrimination against people with disabilities. From that point on, all agencies and programs receiving federal funds had to find ways to accommodate people with disabilities.  The "504" victory ushered in life-changing disability rights activism and laid the groundwork for the later Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
 
Later, Joyce would serve three terms on the board of the American Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities, attending board meetings at the ACCD home office in Washington, D.C., and traveling around the country to tell people about the new law.  She also continued working as a disability counselor for nonprofits and as a telecommunications support representative in the private sector.  By the mid-nineties, however, her physicians had intervened and urged her to retire.
 
Joyce will be dearly missed by her family members. Among her survivors are siblings Thelma Stiles of Napa, Calif., LeRoy Charles Jackson, Jr. '63 of Phoenix, Ariz., Gail (Frank) Harris of San Pedro, Calif., and Raymond (Lilia) Jackson of Fairfield, Calif.; nieces Pamela Stiles of San Francisco, Monica (Jose) Blanco of San Pedro, and Ashley (Paul) Turek of San Francisco and Beverly Hills; nephew Vincent Jackson of Fairfield; grandnephew Dominic Blanco of San Pedro; and grandnieces Sophia Turek and Vanessa Turek of Beverly Hills. Joyce's survivors also include first cousins James (Gretchen) Peters III of Storrs, Conn., Donna (Cyril) Burke of Norristown, Penn., Kimberley Bourne-Vanneck of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Brenda Williams of New Orleans, and Richard (Andrea) Jackson Jr. of New Orleans; and second cousins Joy Jackson of New Orleans, Elizabeth (Greg) Howes of Iowa City, Iowa, Allison Bourne-Vanneck of St. Thomas, and Richard Bourne-Vanneck II of St. Thomas. Joyce will be missed as well by her close friends and former colleagues in the San Francisco-Bay Area and by the many friends she made while living with her sister Gail and brother-in-law Frank in San Pedro, Miami, Florida, and Frankfurt, Germany. Joyce was preceded in death by her parents Bernice and LeRoy Charles Jackson, brother-in-law Patterson Stiles, Jr., aunts Marie Peters and Modess Jackson, uncles Richard Jackson and James Peters, and second cousin Richard Jackson III.
submitted Feb. 10, 2014 4:50P
'73
John A. McKay

John Arlen McKay M.A. ’73, Oct. 25, 2013. He passed away peacefully due to complications related to Alzheimer’s Disease, with family members by his side. John was born Dec. 22, 1932, in Keokuk, to John Henry and Mildred Dorothy McKay. John served in the U.S. Army in Korea. After returning, he completed his college degree in mathematics. The family moved to Mountain View, Calif., in the early 1960s. John worked for Lockheed as a scientist and computer programmer. He earned his master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Santa Clara. He worked at Lockheed until his retirement. He enjoyed classical music, spending time with his wife, caring for the family’s dogs, and trips to Reno. He is survived by his wife, Soon Im; and sons, John K. (Michelle) and James Lee. He is survived locally by his brother, Samuel Thomas McKay (Sharon); sisters, Kay Branson (George) and Carolyn Dodson (Norman); and many nieces and nephews.

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submitted Dec. 3, 2013 10:39P

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