Santa Clara Magazine

For the Alumni and Friends of Santa Clara University

rss icon

CLASS NOTE PRINT DEADLINES

Share your latest news with fellow Broncos in the print edition of Santa Clara Magazine. For the Spring 2015 edition, get your note in by Nov. 15. Notes for the Winter 2015 edition were due by Sept. 1.

 

Class Notes | Obituaries

Submit a Class Note or Obituary »

Showing obituaries submitted anytime

2010

'10
Emily Bordallo

Emily Bordallo ’10 died on Jan. 3, 2012. Friends and family remember how she would light up a room with her smile. Daughter of Ed Bordallo ’74 and Lisa Jafferies ’74, she was an account manager at Barracuda Networks and she touched lives through genuine giving and caring. She was 25 years old.

submitted May. 14, 2012 3:24P
'10
David A. Godinez

David A. Godinez ’07, M.A. '10 of Morgan Hill was born in 1966 and died on Feb. 17, 2013. 

submitted Apr. 18, 2013 1:44P
UGRD Arts & Sciences '10
Colonel John M. Regan
Colonel John M. Regan ‘42, USAF (retired), passed away peacefully in his sleep December 21, 2010 at the age of 90. He was preceded in death by his wife of 51 years, Christille (ne, de Bony de Lavergne) and his 6 brothers, including William V. Regan Jr. '33 and Timothy Regan '37, and sisters. Col. Regan, the son of William V. Regan of Boise, Idaho and Molly Merle of San Francisco, California, was born March 15, 1920 in Boise, Idaho, where he enjoyed an idyllic childhood and popular reign as High School class president and captain of the football team. He attended Boise Junior College, Santa Clara University, the War College of the Pentagon, and received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of San Francisco. In 1941 he pursued his dream of becoming a pilot by joining the U.S. Army Air Corps, eventually flying B17's in the 306th Bombardment Group of the original 8th Air Force. The 306th was a pioneer unit involved in the early Air War in the European Theatre and led the first American raids over Germany, striking targets deep into the heart of the Third Reich. He became commander of the 368th Bombardment Squadron, called the Eager Beavers, and flew over 258 combat hours. He continued an illustrious career in the Air Force, also participating in the Korean and Vietnam wars where he went on to fly B-26's and B-29's. He became a Lieutenant Colonel at the age of 23 and full Colonel at age 31. Col. Regan was base commander in France, Thailand, and the Philippine Islands, and was also stationed in Germany and Korea. He received many distinguished combat decorations and awards, including the Silver Star, two distinguished Flying Crosses, five Air medals and two Purple Hearts. He received three Legions of Merit, The meritorious Service medal, the Joint Service Commendation medal, two Air Force Commendation medals, as well as foreign and U.S. campaign and service medals. It was in Belgrade, Yugoslavia in 1952 that he met Christille de Bony de Lavergne and fell in love. She was working for the French Embassy and John was with the American Embassy. They were married in Versailles, France in 1954. The family grew to accommodate 6 children in almost as many years and moved almost every year and a half. After retiring in 1970 from a 30 year military career Col. Regan stayed active as president of the San Mateo Toastmasters and the San Mateo Park Association. He was generously active in civic organizations and volunteer work with the elderly and the handicapped. He was an avid public speaker and writer and was published over 360 times in different newspapers and magazines. He was a devout Catholic, a loving husband and father, and a humanitarian whose warm smile and kindness will be missed by all those who knew him. He is survived by his 6 children; Guillemette, Georgine, Patrick, Antoinette (Nouna), Kevin and Sean and 8 grandchildren. 
submitted Feb. 23, 2011 12:18P

2011

'11
Adrian F. Morales

Adrian Francisco Morales ’11, age 24, departed from this life on August 21, 2013. He was born on June 20, 1989 in Redwood City, Calif., to Hugo and Roina, but was raised his entire life in San Francisco. He was a graduate of Epiphany Elementary School (2003) and St. Ignatius College Prep (2007). In 2011, he graduated Magna Cum Laude from Santa Clara University (SCU) with a B.S. in Political Science and a minor in History, Philosophy, Arabic, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies. Adrian's work experience first started in 2007 at SCU with their law office as an assistant/proctor. In 2009, he held a summer internship in San Francisco for the California Assembly. The following summer, he worked with the Turkish Coalition of America in Istanbul, Turkey and in the 2011 summer he worked/studied in Jordan. After his graduation, he went to Washington D.C. in Feb. 2011 to intern with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. He was then placed into the minority leader house of representative's office for a few months. In October 2011, he accepted an internship with the California Assembly and a few months later he took a full time position as a Congressional Aide. For such a young age, he traveled to Hawaii, Latin America, Europe and Asia. He was fluent in Spanish and Arabic. Adrian loved speech and debate, going to the movies, watching various history programs, and reading books on all subjects. He truly was a gifted person with a charming personality who was always looking for the meaning of life. Adrian is survived by his parents, Brother Alex, Grandmother Carmen, Uncle Adolfo and many beloved family and friends.

submitted Sep. 6, 2013 4:04P

2012

UGRD Arts & Sciences '12
Eunjey Michael Cho

Most people do not know that Eunjey Michael Cho ’12 was a chess phenom at the age of eight, as he rarely mentioned to others later on that he had won award after award. This was because at age 12 he had realized that each of his wins rendered another person a loser. Seeing the upset on his opponents' faces, Eunjey deemed his success not worth the pain of others and gave up playing competitive chess. His mother and father, Young-mee and Yong Cho, and his older brother, Jey, all noticed that Eunjey's pure heart and thoughtful mind guided him through his life and interactions at a remarkably early age. He studied Psychology at Santa Clara University and after teaching English for a year and a half in South Korea, his parents' birth country, Eunjey adventured through many parts of Asia. As a Jesuit volunteer in Spokane, Wash., Eunjey served as an Emergency Financial Assistance Coordinator through Catholic Charities. Eunjey had always been a talented athlete, and during his JV year, Eunjey ran two marathons. Eunjey left Spokane by bike, determined to ride back to his home in New Jersey while raising funds for the JVC. It was on Sep. 18, 2013 during this exhilarating and challenging bike journey that Eunjey was hit by an automobile and killed. He was 25 years old. His pursuit toward truth in his thoughts, words, and actions, and his innate ability to be mindful in his daily life have inspired so many people to slow down and to reflect on their own potential to be humble yet activated beings with a purpose. In his life, Eunjey developed a profound ability to approach situations and challenges in a curious, nonjudgmental, and fearless manner. He deeply honored the light and dignity within every person he met. He was wise like a grandfather but playful like a child, and he lived life with a courage to which we should all aspire.

submitted Feb. 5, 2014 1:26P

2013

GRD Law '13
Roxanne Roknian

Roxanne "Roxy" Roknian ’14, Nov. 24, 2013. She was a member of the third-year law class. In their stories and memories of her, it is clear that she was a young woman who lived life with enthusiasm and passion, with a keen intellect and a delightful sense of humor. She balanced her studies with her blogging and her commitment to justice for all, with a flair for fashion.

Words fail to convey the sorrow of this time for her family and our community. 
 
submitted Dec. 4, 2013 2:57P
GRD Law '13
Luciana Manriquez

Luciana Manriquez ’13, 29, of Chino, died on June 25, 2013, when the sport utility vehicle she was driving collided with a big rig on southbound Interstate 880 in Fremont, according to the California Highway Patrol.

Manriquez, known to friends and colleagues as Luci, was living in San Jose while attending SCU, where she had just finished her second year of law school. Santa Clara University President Michael E. Engh posted a message on the law school's Facebook page, saying, "We join with Luci's family and friends in prayer and offer consolation amidst the pain of great loss."
 
Manriquez worked for the Northern California Innocence Project, said fellow law student and close friend Clare McKay. "She wanted to work for activist organizations to affect change," said McKay, who met Manriquez when the two were first-year law students.
"For a small person, she had a huge personality; she could make anybody laugh, and she had her own style," McKay recalled. "She was very tough but always very kind. She would tell you like it is, but be very respectful. She would never, ever judge anybody." The two women became best friends.
"She had the most wonderful, distinct laugh," McKay said. "She was laughing often. Luci really loved bad horror movies. She had a tattoo of a chain saw and the face of a famous horror movie actor. She was also influenced by her Mexican heritage," sporting a Dia de Muertos skull tattoo, McKay said.
"Everybody loved Luci."
 
Engh said, "As a community that supports its members in times of joy and in times of sorrow, we join with Luci's family and friends in prayer and offer consolation amidst the pain of great loss. May the peace that Luci will find among the saints turn the pain of loss into a sense of peace for her family and all who grieve for her. Please keep Luci and her family in your prayers."
submitted Jul. 19, 2013 3:28P

Faculty & Staff

'ff
Victor Vari

Dr. Victor B. Vari died on Aug. 20 at the age of 94 after having lived a full and generous life. As a professor, he touched hundreds of students with his passion for languages and cultural studies, particularly Italian. As a colleague, he will be remembered for his generosity and dedication to teaching. As a friend of the University, he leaves behind a legacy that has helped the arts and humanities program at Santa Clara thrive and grow. 

Santa Clara's longest-serving professor, Dr. Vari and his wife, Julia Botto Vari, for decades were among the most passionate and integral figures in humanities and cultural education at Santa Clara. As a young married couple in the midst of a mostly Jesuit faculty, they soon took their place and relished the role of extended family.  
 
The couple nurtured hundreds of students Dr. Vari taught over the decades, many of whom became lifelong friends. The Varis donated their time in countless ways, including conducting student tours of Europe, chaperoning dances and other activities, and hosting dinners at their home.
 
Over a lifetime Dr. Vari and his wife have made significant donations to the University out of a deep love for Santa Clara and its students.  Their most recent gift was an estimated $8 million bequest from their estate, to fund an endowment for the arts and humanities, to name the arts and sciences building, and to support other projects .
 
“Victor Vari devoted himself wholeheartedly to Santa Clara University for nearly 70 years,” said President Michael Engh, S.J. “We are deeply saddened by his loss, and we are grateful for the ways in which he has enriched this campus. As heaven’s newest arrival from the Santa Clara family, may he rest in peace.”
 
Dr. Vari was born in San Francisco in 1920, moved with his family to Italy when he was 1 year old, remaining there until he was 16, when he returned to the Bay Area to attend Galileo High School. He graduated from San Francisco State University and enlisted in the Army, serving as a linguist and military intelligence agent in England and France during World War II before pursuing graduate studies at the Sorbonne in Paris and Lausanne University in Switzerland.
 
Before Dr. Vari joined SCU in 1946, he also had spent time as an Olympic fencing coach, journalist, actor, radio announcer, and elementary school teacher. He received his master’s degree from Stanford University in 1952 and completed his Ph.D. (summa cum laude) at the University of Madrid in Spain in 1961. He began his academic career as a student teacher at Stanford before joining SCU.
 
Dr. Vari joined the faculty of Santa Clara University in 1946 and taught until his retirement in 2012. While at SCU, he taught all levels of French, Spanish, and Italian language, culture, and literature, and served as chair of the Modern Language department for more than 20 years. He led many student tours through Europe and initiated and taught at the Assisi summer program, 1982 to 2004. As the longest-serving faculty member for many years, Dr. Vari was the ceremonial mace-bearer at commencement and at other important events from 1969-2012.
 
“Dr. Vari’s contributions to campus academics, culture, and student life are immeasurable,” said Atom Yee, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “We will celebrate his life and legacy for decades to come.”
 
Dr. Vari is survived by his wife Julia, cousins Don and GeorgeAnn Proia of Oakland, as well as the Proia family in Italy, and hundreds of former students--the children the Varis never had--who now live around the globe.
 
Notes of condolence may be sent to Julia Vari, c/o the Dean's Office.
 

 

submitted Aug. 26, 2014 12:35P
'ff
Susan Rodriguez

We are saddened to announce the death of Susan Rodriguez, Custodial Contract Administrator, Facilities Department, University Operations.  Susan passed away June 17, 2014 in Santa Clara, CA.  Susan is survived by her three children Amy, Jack, and Matthew, their spouses, and her 6 grandchildren.  Please remember Susan and her family in your prayers.  Notes of sympathy/condolences may be sent to the Facilities Department.

submitted Jul. 15, 2014 1:05P
'ff
Stephen J. Corio

Faculty member Stephen J. Corio ’68, MBA ’76 died on October 5. A double alumnus of Santa Clara University, Steve joined the faculty in the Leavey School of Business in 1998. Prior to coming to Santa Clara, he had a successful career with IBM and wanted to give back during his "second career" at the University, teaching in the Marketing Department. He was dedicated to his students throughout his time here, having taught undergraduate and MBA students alike. Students filled his classrooms and benefited from his wise counsel as a student adviser. Together with his family, we mourn Steve's death while also thanking God for the gift of his life. He will be missed by everyone who knew him.

 
Notes of condolence may be sent to Steve's family, care of the Business School:
 
The Corio Family
c/o Leavey School of Business
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
 
submitted Nov. 15, 2013 3:22P
'ff
Roberto Rodriguez

Roberto "Robert" Rodriguez, April 7, 2014. Robert worked at SCU in Facilities from 1985 until his retirement in 2011. Robert was a mentor to many and offered a warm welcome to newcomers in Facilities. Robert is survived by his wife, two children, and grandchildren. Notes of condolences can be sent to Facilities. Please hold Robert and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

submitted May. 30, 2014 4:33P
'ff
Robert Riemenschneider

Bob Riemenschneider, adjunct lecturer in Computer Engineering, died suddenly on July 8. Bob taught at Santa Clara since 2001 and was integral to the Computer Engineering department in offering graduate courses in theoretical foundations of software engineering. His work in industry, most recently as senior technical consultant at the local startup company, Starview, Inc., brought valuable experience into the classroom to the benefit of his students.

Bob was born in Evanston, IL, in 1951 and was a life-long Cubs fan. He graduated from Miami University in Ohio and got an MA in mathematics from Cal Berkeley. He worked at SRI in Menlo Park for more than 20 years.

Bob's great passion was music. He loved his Beatles, his Gibsons, classes at the Fur Peace Ranch, and the music of the Rev. Gary Davis. His favorite hours were the times he spent playing with his wife Anne as The Warblers. Together they loved spending time with their friends at South Bay Folk, City Espresso, and at the Gibson Homecoming. 

Bob's sudden death brings a deep sadness to his wife, Anne, his family and colleagues. With his loved ones, we mourn Bob’s death and recall the gift he was to all. We hold Bob and his family in our thoughts and prayers with the hope that they give comfort and consolation to his family in their grief.
submitted Jul. 15, 2014 3:22P
'ff
Robert J. Parden

Dr. Robert James Parden died July 20, 2014, after a brief illness, at home in Saratoga surrounded by his family. He was 92.

Dr. Parden was a former professor and dean of the School of Engineering, 1954-1982. His dynamic presence, longevity with the University, and visionary leadership in the School of Engineering are legendary. Among his many contributions to the University, Dr. Parden launched the graduate engineering program in 1959, offering "Early Bird" classes for working professionals, and established the Department of Engineering Management and Leadership in 1978. He remained a faculty member of the Department until retirement in 2012. An inductee in the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame, Dr. Parden helped build a reputation for Santa Clara throughout the high-tech industry. He left an indelible mark on his colleagues and students as a skilled professional, passionate teacher, and gifted leader.

Robert James Parden was born in Mason City, Iowa on April 17, 1922, the son of James Ambrose Parden and Mary Fahey Parden. He was raised in Iowa City, Iowa. He served as Lieutenant in the US Army Quartermaster Corp before earning his BS and MS degrees in Engineering from the University of Iowa. In 1953, he became one of the first PhD graduates of the University of Iowa’s Department of Industrial Engineering. He then embarked on a 50 year career marked by distinguished contributions in industry practice, engineering education and university administration. He was a sought after speaker at conferences and published numerous books and papers.

 
Dr. Parden began his career as professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology. In 1954 Dr. Parden was appointed Dean of the Engineering College at Santa Clara University. There he expanded and updated the engineering curriculum and led efforts that brought the Sullivan Engineering Center and laboratories to the university. Dean Parden created the nation's first successful continuing education program for graduate engineering, established graduate programs that ushered Silicon Valley Companies to the forefront of engineering management, and expanded the imprint of Santa Clara University throughout the high-tech industry.  Another key component of Dean Parden’s success was that the School of Engineering drew not only students but also adjunct faculty members from high-tech.  People like Intel’s CEO Andy Grove and ESL’s President William Perry, who went on to serve as the United States' Secretary of Defense under President Bill Clinton. Dr. Parden authored seminal research in the field of engineering management and was an active leader of the American Society for Engineering Education, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and American Institute of Industrial Engineers. He was elected to Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi honorary societies and was a licensed Professional Engineer and General Contractor. In 1993 Dr. Parden was inducted into the Silicon Valley Hall of Fame.
 
Bob's matched his passion for engineering excellence with lifelong dedication to his community and his large and active local family. He set out to live the American Dream and he accomplished it. Bob was a long time resident of Saratoga, residing in the home he designed and built in 1959 until his passing.  Bob was a licensed professional engineer and general building contractor. He founded Parden Construction and proudly served on the Saratoga Planning Commission.  Bob was able to see Saratoga grow as the Silicon Valley was transforming from the Valley of Heart’s Delight, where orchards of fruit trees blossomed each spring. For Bob life was also an exploration he looked at with a keen mind through his travels.  Whether it was his regular trips to Aptos to enjoy the Pacific, or his wider world travels, Bob always enjoyed the experience.  His last cruise to Alaska with three generations of his family was in 2013 and he traveled to Aptos in June 2014 with 18 members of his immediate family.
 
Bob is survived by Elizabeth Taylor Parden, his devoted and loving wife of 59 years; four children: Pattie Bradley '78 of San Jose, Jim (Lisa) Parden of Saratoga, Jack Parden '83 (Mary) Parden of Redwood Shores, and Nancy Badgett '85 (Mel) of Saratoga. He also leaves nine beloved grandchildren, who were all wild about their Bop. His sister, Dorothy Smith of Iowa City, Iowa, brother in law Jack Taylor (Wilbi) along with many loved and accomplished nieces and nephews. 
 
With a keen intellect, charming wit and warm heart, Bob lived life to its fullest and invested in others with uncommon compassion and integrity. He taught many, inspired many more and was admired and loved by all who knew him.
 
The family asks that letters of condolences be made to his wife, Betty, c/o Santa Clara University, Dean's Office.

 

submitted Jul. 25, 2014 8:21A
'ff
Rick Blick

SCU Men’s Lacrosse Head Coach Rick Blick died suddenly on Monday, June 2, from complications of a brain aneurism. Coach Blick coached the club team for two years, often suiting up with his players during practices.  His contagious fun loving personality, his positive spirit, and his love of lacrosse and our team will truly be missed. 

Coach Blick grew up on Long Island, NY, and attended Hobart College where he was a three time First Team All American goalie and USA World Team Player.  Coach Blick brought over 40 years of lacrosse playing and coaching experience. During his time here he has helped set the stage for positive momentum to strengthen the lacrosse program.
 
With his family, we mourn Coach Blick’s death and recall the gift he was to all. He will be missed, especially by the athletes who benefited from his care for them and camaraderie.
 
Notes of condolence may be sent to the Blick family, care of the Athletics Departmen.
submitted Jun. 6, 2014 2:08P
'ff
Richard Degnon

Richard W. Degnon, a resident of San Jose, was born Jan. 6, 1928. He is survived by daughter Kathleen Ransom; sons Timothy ’76, James, and Daniel; and nine grandchildren. Degnon was a 1953 journalism graduate of San Jose State University and worked as a reporter for the L.A. Times, Glendale News-Press, and San Jose Mercury-News. Degnon was SCU's athletic news director from 1962 to 1981. He was also a member of the Santa Clara Rotary Club and a board member of Branham Hills Senior Baseball League. He was the first president, in 1969, of Pioneer High School Sports Boosters Club. While in the Air Force, he edited Ladd Field, Alaska's, "farthest north newspaper in world". Degnon was the last serviceman to transfer from the Army to Air Force, June 30, 1948, before both became separate U.S. branches. 

submitted Aug. 3, 2012 11:16A
'ff
Michael A. Sweeney

Michael Anthony Sweeney, of Santa Cruz, died in his home on March 26, 2013 of pancreatic cancer. He was 81. Sweeney joined the chemistry faculty at Santa Clara University in 1966, and he taught until the fall of 2012. In 2001 he was named professor emeritus. Prior to teaching he worked as a research chemist for Standard Oil, and also rose to the rank of captain while serving in the US Air Force.

Sweeney was born on Dec. 5, 1931 in Los Angeles, to James Robert Sweeney and Ruth (Bauter) Sweeney.

He attended Loyola High School, and in 1953 graduated cum laude from Loyola Marymount University, (then, Loyola University).  He earned his master's, then doctorate in radiation chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1962. The research for his Ph.D. dissertation, Radiation Chemistry of Isopropyl Compounds, was directed by Nobel laureates Amos Newton and Glenn Seaborg at Lawrence Berkeley Labs, where Sweeney operated a cyclotron. During that period he is credited along with two other scientists with discovery of the isotope Rhenium (181).

He performed research and published scientific articles throughout his career. In conjunction with NASA-AMES, he studied the area of abiotic biosynthesis—the origin of organic molecules on the early earth and solar system, the formation of organic molecules resulting from radiation fluxes, and carbonaeous chondrite chemistry. His investigation into the radiation levels of the primitive Earth atmosphere added to our understanding of the origin of life.

In 1966 Sweeney began teaching chemistry at Santa Clara University. It was a position he called "the best job I've ever had." Students from his first graduating class presented him with a pamphlet titled "Sweeney's Similes," in which they had recorded many of the analogies from his lectures for which he was well-known. Ten of his first 11 chemistry majors went on to earn their doctorates in chemistry; the eleventh earned a J.D. Several of these students reached out to Sweeney during his final weeks, offering gratitude for his inspiration.

Sweeney is survived by three children, Matthew ’93, Anna ’86, and Daniel ’87, their spouses, and two grandchildren.  

A memorial service will be held at Mission Santa Clara on April 11 at 6:00 p.m. A reception will follow at the Arts and Sciences Building on the Santa Clara University Campus, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053. His ashes will be laid to rest in Ireland by his children.  

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that a charitable donation be made to Santa Clara University, The Chemistry Dept., in Memory of Michael A. Sweeney, University Relations, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA  95053; or via the web at www.scu.edu/give/

 

Donations will be awarded to a chemistry major who demonstrates interest in a teaching career.


Notes of sympathy may be sent to:

The Sweeney Family

c/o Chemistry & Biochemistry Department

Daly Science Center

500 El Camino Real

Santa Clara, CA 95053

 

submitted Mar. 28, 2013 9:01A
'ff
Mary Asuncion

Mary Asuncion served Santa Clara University twenty-three years as senior administrative assistant in the Human Resources Office and the Mathematics & Computer Science Department. 

Mary's daughter, Kimberly Moreno ’96, shared the joy and pride her mother felt being part of the Santa Clara community. Having fought a long and courageous battle with cancer, Mary now rests in the loving arms of God.
submitted Dec. 20, 2012 1:06P
'ff
Larry Hauser

Larry Hauser, part of the Broncos coaching staff from 1983 to 1997, died of complications from internal injuries earlier this month. The Chicago native served as Cal State University, Dominguez Hills men’s basketball coach from 1997 to 2004. During his tenure there, Coach Hauser developed eight All-California Collegiate Athletic Association and two NCAA All-Region student-athletes while leading the program to a second-place league finish during his first season as head coach.

Hauser graduated from Chicago State in 1971 with a bachelor’s degree in physical education and earned his master’s degree in English in 1973.  He was a highly successful high school basketball coach in Illinois and California prior to joining the coaching staff at Santa Clara University, where he recruited current NBA All-Pro and two-time MVP Steve Nash prior to going to CSU Dominguez Hills.

“I will remember Coach Hauser as a passionate and dedicated coach and educator with an extremely quick wit and strong sense of humor,” says CSUDH Patrick Guillen, athletic director. “He will certainly be missed.”

A Fresno resident at the time of his death, Hauser is survived by his wife Robyn and daughter Lindsey.

submitted Feb. 16, 2012 7:13P
'ff
Kathryn Bauer Ivers

Kathryn Bauer Ivers, June 8, 1914 to July 7, 2012, was executive secretary to Athletic Director Pat Malley for more than 15 years; prior to that she worked in the Admissions office. Daughter of Julius J. and Mary A. Bauer. Kathryn was born in Chicago, Ill., and attended DePaul University. Preceded in death by loving husband Edward J. Ivers. Mother of Patricia "Irish" Burney ’67 (David) of Leesburg, Virginia, Barry (Sheila) Ivers of San Jose, and Michael ’71 (Sherry) Ivers of Sparks, Nevada. Grandchildren: Nathaniel, Laurel, Jonathan, Samantha, Danielle, and Barry. Great-grandmother of 5, and countless nieces and nephews, all of whom she loved dearly. Kathy traveled the world with her husband, Army Lt. Col. Ed Ivers, and while living in Germany in the mid-fifties, was named Catholic Woman of the Year. Later, when the family moved to California, she was the assistant to the dean of Admissions at Santa Clara University (SCU), a position she had also held at Georgetown University a few years prior. Her love for SCU continued when she became the executive secretary to the Athletic Director, a position which she held until her retirement from SCU in 1980. She later lived in McLean, Va., with her daughter and her family. Kathy leaves behind many relatives and close friends in San Jose, Chicago, and McLean. Kathy was very proud of all three of her children, and especially proud of their graduating from college. She continued to love and encourage the next generation of her family always. She will be missed, but never forgotten.

submitted Jul. 30, 2012 4:30P
'ff
John Dullea, S.J.

John F. Dullea, S.J., 85, died Friday, August 1, 2014, at Sacred Heart Jesuit Center, Los Gatos, after a long illness.

Jack was born in San Francisco in 1929, graduated from St. Ignatius College Prep, and entered the Jesuit Order in Los Gatos in 1945. After a period of studies and teaching he went to Innsbruck, Austria, for his theological studies where he was ordained to the priesthood on July 26, 1959. He did graduate studies at the Gregorian University, Rome, where he earned a doctorate in Theology in 1963.

His assignments included teaching Theology at Santa Clara University, retreat director at the Jesuit Retreat Center, Los Altos, and parish work at St. Mary's Church, Ogden, Utah. He also spent a total of eleven years at the Jesuit headquarters in Rome in a variety of administrative positions.

In 1990 he moved into high school guidance work as college counselor, first at Bellarmine College Prep, San Jose, and then, from 2000-08, at Verbum Dei High School in the Watts area of Los Angeles. He served as Senior Priest at the Jesuit novitiate in Culver City before retiring to Sacred Heart Jesuit Center in 2010.

Jack was the brother of the late Fr. Charles Dullea, S.J., former president of the University of San Francisco. He is survived by many nieces and nephews.

submitted Aug. 14, 2014 10:13P
'ff
Howard Anawalt

Long-time law faculty member and Professor Emeritus Howard Anawalt died August 6, 2013, peacefully at home in his sleep. Professor Anawalt joined Santa Clara University School of Law in 1967 and was one of the first faculty members to specialize in the legal questions arising out of the high tech industry. He remained an active scholar and member of the Law School community even after he retired in 2003. Howard held a passion for teaching and a commitment to his profession which resonated with generations of students in his decades of service to the law school and the University community. He will be remembered as a kind and generous person who never hesitated to offer assistance to his students and colleagues.

"The High Tech Law Institute remains incredibly grateful for Prof. Anawalt's many foundational contributions to our program," said Prof. Eric Goldman, Director of the High Tech Law Institute.  "Our high tech law program would not be as rich and successful as it's been without his foresighted efforts.  On a personal note, Prof. Anawalt shared his 1994 Computer Law syllabus with me when I first developed my own Internet Law course in 1995, and his thoughts influenced my concepts about the course a lot."
 
Howard Anawalt is considered by many to be the father of the nationally recognized intellectual property program at Santa Clara Law. He joined the School of Law in 1967, and specialized in constitutional law, torts, and intellectual property law. “Howard Anawalt was a great teacher and scholar at Santa Clara University’s law school and he was instrumental in forming and advancing the Law School’s highly acclaimed intellectual property law program,” says Professor Donald Polden, who served as dean from 2003-2013. “He exemplified the great teacher-scholars in legal education and he will be missed by his many friends from Santa Clara University.”
 
In a letter to the University community, President Michael Engh, S.J. wrote, “With his expertise in intellectual property law, he was one of the first faculty members to address in his teaching the legal questions arising out of the high tech industry… Howard held a passion for teaching and a commitment to his profession which resonated with generations of students in his decades of service to the law school and the University community.”
 
Anawalt earned his A.B. from Stanford University and his J.D. from Boalt Hall School of Law, U.C. Berkeley. He was admitted to practice in the states of California and Washington and in the Supreme Court. He served as a legislative intern and legal adviser, then deputy attorney general to the California Assembly Judiciary Committee. His law practice experience included criminal jury trials, Vietnam War draft and court-martial cases, labor injunction litigation, sex and race discrimination lawsuits, and involvement in high-technology litigation and transaction practice.
 
At Santa Clara Law he was a very involved member of the faculty and served in many leadership and advisory roles until his retirement in 2003. He was the inaugural director of Santa Clara Law’s International Institute, now called the Center for Global Law and Policy, and he served as the first director of the Santa Clara University School of Law High Tech Advisory Board, first convened in 1990. He directed Santa Clara’s client counseling and national trial competitions, advised the Santa Clara Law Review, administered the Tokyo summer program, and served as adviser to the Santa Clara Law Computer and High Technology Law Journal.
 
Among his many publications, two stand out as the most significant: Idea Rights:  A Guide to Intellectual Property (Carolina Press,) and IP Strategies: Complete Intellectual Property Planning, Access and Protection (West Publication).
 
Howard’s fellow faculty members remembered him with fondness and respect. “Former students often comment on Howard’s pleasant and compassionate classroom demeanor, but also his rigorous attention to details of cases and the importance of policy in the development of laws,” said Professor Polden. “He remained a dedicated and accomplished scholar after his retirement, including a recent publication of a book on legal protection of ideas.”
“Howard’s academic interests covered a broad span, from constitutional law to high technology,” said Professor Bradley Joondeph. “In many ways, he foresaw the direction that law would be headed, many years before most lawyers had any inkling.”
 
“Howard will be remembered as a kind and generous person, who never hesitated to offer assistance to his students and colleagues,” said Professor Ken Manaster, who joined Santa Clara Law in 1972. “He had an exceptionally inquisitive mind. He seemed often to be delving into a new topic in law or into a new angle within a field he already had mastered, such as tort law, intellectual property, or constitutional law. His friendliness toward colleagues, and his active give-and-take in discussions of the law and of the law school’s responsibilities to the profession, even after he retired, will be missed.”
 
Anawalt leaves his wife, Sue, his son Brad and daughter-in-law Kirsten, his son Paul and daughter-in-law Valeria, his grandchildren Kathryn, Juliet, Gwyneth, Kevin, and Dillon, and his many students and colleagues.

 

submitted Aug. 30, 2013 10:02A
'ff
George J. Alexander

George J. Alexander, former law school dean and professor emeritus, died peacefully July 29, 2013, after a prolonged illness. George led the law school from 1970 to 1985—a period of great growth both in enrollment and in prominence for the law school, making him one of the most influential deans in its 100-year history. During his time as dean, George emphasized scholarship, hired distinguished faculty, and with his commitment to diversifying the legal profession, recruited talented students of color from across the country.  He led the law school in developing a more international law curriculum and established it as a pre-eminent global legal educator.

George left a strong legacy of commitment to advancing the legal profession and improving access to legal services. He and his wife, Katharine, have been great friends and supporters of the law school. In 2004, they endowed operations of the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center, which serves low-income people in matters of consumer law, immigration law, and workers’ rights. In 2008, they established the annual Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize, which recognizes lawyers who have used their legal careers to help alleviate injustice and inequity.

As professor, dean and friend of Santa Clara, George embodied the University’s mission and values by combining a high regard for academic rigor with a personal commitment to making the world a better place. While we mourn George’s death, we also thank God for the gift of his life. The University community will miss his leadership, wisdom, and friendship.
submitted Sep. 6, 2013 3:14P
'ff
Edwin H. Taylor

Edwin H. Taylor, born March 9, 1939, passed away March 10, 2012. It is with profound sadness that the firm of Blakely Sokoloff Taylor & Zafman (BSTZ) announces the passing of one of its founders, Edwin H. Taylor, after a battle with cancer. Ed passed away at the home he built and loved, overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Gualala. Ed, a native of New Jersey, received degrees in electrical engineering, including an M.S. from Columbia University. He served in the United States Air Force at Midland Air Force Base in Texas. While in the Air Force, he earned a law degree from St. Mary's University in Texas. An opportunity to join an intellectual property firm in Los Angeles brought him to California in 1968. One of his assignments was to prepare and prosecute patent applications for what was then a small technology company. The company was Intel Corporation. Ed continued to represent Intel for more than 40 years, almost the entire span of his law career. In 1975, Ed and three other founders launched BSTZ, starting in a small office in Beverly Hills. From that modest beginning, the firm has grown to more than 65 partners and associates in six offices in four states. Most of the growth is attributable to Ed's efforts and skills, both as a lawyer and, more significant, as a builder of lasting relationships with clients, colleagues, and staff. In the early 1980s, Ed had the foresight to see that Silicon Valley was going to grow into a national and, ultimately, an international technology center. Accordingly, he convinced his partners that they should invest in opening an office in Sunnyvale. As is often said, the rest is history. Ed's clients include a virtual roster of successful Silicon Valley technology companies, including (in addition to Intel) Apple (since its inception), eBay, and Echelon. His legal career had several very notable accomplishments. He prepared patent applications for well known inventors such as Gordon Moore of Intel and Steve Wozniak of Apple. He was the lead litigator in Apple's ITC lawsuit against the Apple II clones, and he represented Apple in the seminal software copyright case Apple v. Franklin. He also pioneered the use of U.S. Customs to enforce U.S. copyrights for software. Finally, he had the ability to give practical advice to clients without overlawyering. Ed also gave generously of his time to the intellectual property community. For more than a decade, he was an adjunct professor at Santa Clara University Law School. He also was a co-chair of the Practicing Law Institute's Conference Program on "Intellectual Property Issues in Business Transactions", and served as a lawyer delegate to the 9th Circuit Judicial Conference. Throughout his life, Ed was an outstanding athlete. He was an avid runner and cyclist; he ran marathons, competed in triathlons, and completed numerous century rides. He was also a certified scuba diver. His passion for scuba diving took him to locations all over the globe, from sites in the South Pacific to those off the coast of Israel. Construction was another of Ed's passions. At the start of his legal career, he built a house in the Hollywood Hills that was featured in Architectural Digest. After moving to head up the firm's Sunnyvale office, he built two uniquely designed houses in Mendocino County, one of which was also featured in Architectural Digest, in addition to many other magazines and books. Time permitting, he often worked on his houses while they were under construction by installing the electrical wiring and driving a bulldozer to grade the property. His colleagues at BSTZ, his clients and friends everywhere will miss him greatly.

submitted Apr. 5, 2012 5:02P
'ff
Diane di Bari

Dr. Diane Hijos di Bari passed away on May 7, 2013. Dr. di Bari started teaching in the Liberal Studies Program in Fall of 2003. She was a popular and caring professor. She taught our Exceptional Child course (LBST 138) for the program a total of 17 times in the last ten years and impacted the education of hundreds of undergraduates.

Dr. di Bari had tremendous compassion for children and was a leader in the field. She was able to translate the science of exceptional children to individual lives. Santa Clara University and the Liberal Studies Program was fortunate to have her on our faculty. 

She is survived by her husband Mike, mother Rosie, brother Brian, sons Paul and Nicholas, and numerous nieces, cousins and extended family. Diane was born in Chowchilla, CA on January 29, 1951 to parents Pete and Rosie Hijos. She attended Chowchilla High School and went on to graduate from Occidental College with a BA in Psychology and Fresno State with a MS in School Psychology.
 
Diane had an immense passion for helping children. She worked as a school psychologist for Santa Clara Unified School District, providing special education evaluations to identify programs and opportunities for improved learning, education and advancement for students. Diane's yearning for continual education found her pursuing her own opportunities, taking her to various leadership positions within the school district, her professional organizations, and academic institutions. In 2010 Diane completed her
PsyD in Neuropsychology, focusing on verbal memory and language in Spanish speaking children.
 
After 35 years of personal and professional achievements, Diane retired in 2012 from positions at Santa Clara Unified School District, Santa Clara University, and Alliant International University. Throughout her career, Diane was honored as an outstanding educator, received lifetime achievement awards and various certificates of recognition for her service to the field of psychology, her students and colleagues.
 
She will be best remembered for her selfless and humble demeanor in serving others, both personally and professionally.
submitted Jun. 14, 2013 10:57A
'ff
Betty Moran

Elizabeth "Betty" Moran, professor emerita in English, died on June 23 after a long illness. She was 95 years old. Betty joined the English Department at Santa Clara in 1963 as one of three women faculty at the University. She retired in 1994 and thereafter received emerita status.  

Betty was a woman of "firsts" and made her mark at Santa Clara as a teacher, scholar and administrator. She was the first woman to gain tenure in the College of Arts and Sciences; was the first woman elected president of the Faculty Senate; was the first woman to direct the Grants and Fellowships Office and the Faculty Development Program; served as the first woman chair of the Affirmative Action Committee; and founded and directed the Teaching and Learning Center.  As a pioneer in African and African-American literature, Betty was the first at Santa Clara to teach a course in African literature. Her persistent work to establish a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa at Santa Clara paid off in 1977 when we became the first Catholic institution west of the Mississippi River to earn a chapter.

Moran had a 31-year career at Santa Clara before her retirement in 1994. And in a 1988 proclamation in her honor, the Rev. Paul Locatelli, then Santa Clara's president, said, "Now let it therefore be known that whereas Sainte Clare is the First Lady of Santa Clara, Elizabeth J. Moran is the Second Lady of Santa Clara University."
 
Moran didn't slow down much in retirement, either. She worked with homeless women and children as co-chairwoman of the Georgia Travis Center board for InnVision. 
 
Betty will be remembered for her service, collegiality, and generosity as a teacher and mentor. Santa Clara has lost a dedicated member of the University community. We join with Betty's family and all who mourn her loss and thank God for the gift of her long life.  Please keep Betty and her family in your thoughts and prayers. May she rest in peace.

 

submitted Jul. 15, 2014 1:03P
Viewing 1076-1100 of 1119 (page 44 of 45)
first | prev | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | next | last

Search all notes/obituaries: