Books

Writer Eric Goodman on campus April 17

Writer Eric Goodman on campus April 17
by Santa Clara Magazine |
Author of the new novel Twelfth and Race read fiction — and promised some vintage television writing.

The story of Eric Goodman's latest novel, Twelfth and Race, just out from University of Nebraska Press, is one of the intersection of love, race, and identity—and what happens when the death of a young black father catapults a midwestern city into chaos.


It's Goodman's fifth novel, and part of the Flyover Fiction series, edited by SCU's Ron Hansen M.A. '95, who is the Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Professor of Arts and Humanities, as well as the literary editor for this magazine. Goodman's previous novels include In Days of Awe and Child of My Right Hand.


In addition to his fictioneering, Goodman is a veteran television writer, lyricist, and journalist with more than 150 articles and essays that have appeared in the likes of GQ, the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, and Saveur. He directs the creative writing program at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Goodman read from his new work on April 17 at SCU.

 
 
 

 

Summer 2014

Table of contents

Features

A day with the Dalai Lama

High-spirited and hushed moments from Feb. 24: a day to talk about business, ethics, compassion.

The Catholic writer today

Poet and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts Dana Gioia argues that Catholic writers must renovate and reoccupy their own tradition.

Our stories and the theatre of awe

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Marilynne Robinson speaks about grace, discernment, and being a modern believer.

Mission Matters

What would the next generation say?

Hossam Baghat, one of Egypt’s leading human rights activists, was awarded the 2014 Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize for his work defending human rights.

Breaking records on the maplewood

Scoring 40 points in one game. And besting Steve Nash’s freshman year.

How's the water?

A lab on a chip helps provide the answer—which is a matter of life and death when the question is whether drinking water contains arsenic.