Arts

Lost and found

Lost and found
His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Kamataka, India, January 1998. Copyright Richard Avedon, 1998. Courtesy of the Richard Avedon Foundation.
by Jeff Gire |
A look at The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama—now on campus

The task for 88 internationally renowned artists from 30 countries: Inspired by the Dalai Lama, work in media ancient and new to make your art. The result is The Missing Peace, with painting, sculpture, installation, and photography that are poignant and comical, contemplating religion and politics. Now, following a five-year world tour, 28 selections from the exhibit have taken up temporary residence on the third-floor Archives and Special Collections gallery of the Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Technology Center, and Orradre Library.

Among the artwork on display is an intimate portrait of the Dalai Lama by Chuck Close and one of Binh Danh’s signature chlorophyll prints, which replicates a photograph on a leaf using photosynthesis. Other artists featured include Richard Avedon, Squeak Carnwath, and Mike and Doug Starn. 

The show ran through Dec. 14, with some special events this fall, including two panels with photographers and scholars: on Oct. 27, “Photography, Transformation, and Peace” (6–8:30 p.m., de Saisset Museum) and Nov. 8, “Art, Transformation, and Peace” (5–6:30 p.m., St. Clare Room, Learning Commons and Library).

Winter 2014

Table of contents

Features

Rise up, my love

There are the sanctuaries built for worship—and that carry beauty and grace for all to see. Then there are the improvised places of faith, perhaps more subtle in how they speak to the wonder worked there.

The chaplain is in the House

With the way things have gone recently in Congress, looking to the heavens for some help and guidance might seem like a very good idea. In fact, that’s what Pat Conroy, S.J., M.Div. ’83 is there to do.

Welcome to Citizenville

Who published the one book on government in 2013 that conservative firebrand Newt Gingrich told all true believers that they should read? Well, the author is now lieutenant governor of California. Before that, he was mayor of San Francisco. That’s right: It’s Gavin Newsom ’89.

Mission Matters

Goooaal!

Women’s soccer wins the West Coast Conference championship.

Patent trolls, beware

The White House has brought on SCU’s Colleen Chien, a leading expert in patent law, as senior advisor.

A sight of innocence

George Souliotes went to prison for three life sentences after he was convicted of arson and murder. Twenty years later, he’s out—after the Northern California Innocence Project proved he didn’t do it.