Events

Upcoming events within the Ignatian Center.

"Economy and Security in the 21st Century" with Madeleine Albright
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    How can America retain its leadership role amidst rapid globalization? Is America truly the indispensable nation? How do domestic politics influence foreign policy?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
A Meander Through Modern Physics
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, March 31 and April 7, 14, 21, 28
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102  (Room Change)

    We've come a long way from thinking that the earth is at the center of the universe; we now know that the physical world is very different from what it appears to be to our senses. In this course, we will examine some of the key paradigms and discoveries of modern Physics that form our current model of the Universe and which push the limits of our ability to understand it.  Some of the topics we'll consider include: Newtonian dynamics; thermodynamics; quantum mechanics; relativity; and cosmology.  We'll see how these tie together to form our current model of the physical world, and we'll use them to explore what is known about the origin and beginning of the Universe (Big Bang) and how the Universe is evolving.  We'll also look at some of the big questions that physicists are working on today. 
    There are no prerequisites for the course other than a curiosity about the world around you.  We will take a purely qualitative approach.  No math background is required, although some technical aptitude might be helpful.  In lieu of that, however, just bring your enthusiasm and a willingness to chew on some bizarre new ideas and concepts.

    Dr. John Trudeau has been teaching in corporate and academic settings for over thirty years and has been recognized for his ability to make complex technical subjects easily understandable.  He holds graduate degrees in both Physics and Psychology, in pursuit of his personal lifetime goal to understand "how the world works."  In the course of his career in Silicon Valley, Dr. Trudeau has worked at Hewlett-Packard, Apple Computer, Cisco Systems and several start-up companies.  He was also Director of the Engineering and Technology, and Business and Management programs at the Silicon Valley Extension Campus of UC Santa Cruz. John has done research on molecular electron quantum states, precision physical measurements, and more recently on functional brain imaging as a diagnostic tool for Attention Deficit Disorder and other psychiatric conditions.  His other interests over the years have included hiking, windsurfing, sailing, fishing, woodworking, Bonsai, and building astronomical telescopes.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, March 31 and April 7, 14, 21, 28
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102  (Room Change)

    We've come a long way from thinking that the earth is at the center of the universe; we now know that the physical world is very different from what it appears to be to our senses. In this course, we will examine some of the key paradigms and discoveries of modern Physics that form our current model of the Universe and which push the limits of our ability to understand it.  Some of the topics we'll consider include: Newtonian dynamics; thermodynamics; quantum mechanics; relativity; and cosmology.  We'll see how these tie together to form our current model of the physical world, and we'll use them to explore what is known about the origin and beginning of the Universe (Big Bang) and how the Universe is evolving.  We'll also look at some of the big questions that physicists are working on today. 
    There are no prerequisites for the course other than a curiosity about the world around you.  We will take a purely qualitative approach.  No math background is required, although some technical aptitude might be helpful.  In lieu of that, however, just bring your enthusiasm and a willingness to chew on some bizarre new ideas and concepts.

    Dr. John Trudeau has been teaching in corporate and academic settings for over thirty years and has been recognized for his ability to make complex technical subjects easily understandable.  He holds graduate degrees in both Physics and Psychology, in pursuit of his personal lifetime goal to understand "how the world works."  In the course of his career in Silicon Valley, Dr. Trudeau has worked at Hewlett-Packard, Apple Computer, Cisco Systems and several start-up companies.  He was also Director of the Engineering and Technology, and Business and Management programs at the Silicon Valley Extension Campus of UC Santa Cruz. John has done research on molecular electron quantum states, precision physical measurements, and more recently on functional brain imaging as a diagnostic tool for Attention Deficit Disorder and other psychiatric conditions.  His other interests over the years have included hiking, windsurfing, sailing, fishing, woodworking, Bonsai, and building astronomical telescopes.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Split Room Location: 
    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (April 10)
    Library Viewing and Taping Room A (April 17, 24 and May 1, 8)

     
    An in-depth introduction to the first Modernist novel in the English language. This class will examine James Joyce’s coming-of-age tale of a boy growing into Irish Catholic manhood, and struggling with questions of faith, family, and identity. It’s a drama of Irish politics and religion, and parallels the author’s own personal development. We’ll explore his use of stream-of-consciousness, motif, point-of-view, epiphany, and allegory in the novel, and pay particular attention to the masterful language Joyce uses.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives.  Especially Mr. Harville’s.  

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Friday, May 1, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Split Room Location: 
    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (April 10)
    Library Viewing and Taping Room A (April 17, 24 and May 1, 8)

     
    An in-depth introduction to the first Modernist novel in the English language. This class will examine James Joyce’s coming-of-age tale of a boy growing into Irish Catholic manhood, and struggling with questions of faith, family, and identity. It’s a drama of Irish politics and religion, and parallels the author’s own personal development. We’ll explore his use of stream-of-consciousness, motif, point-of-view, epiphany, and allegory in the novel, and pay particular attention to the masterful language Joyce uses.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives.  Especially Mr. Harville’s.  

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
  • Friday, May 8, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Split Room Location: 
    Loyola Hall, Room 160 (April 10)
    Library Viewing and Taping Room A (April 17, 24 and May 1, 8)

     
    An in-depth introduction to the first Modernist novel in the English language. This class will examine James Joyce’s coming-of-age tale of a boy growing into Irish Catholic manhood, and struggling with questions of faith, family, and identity. It’s a drama of Irish politics and religion, and parallels the author’s own personal development. We’ll explore his use of stream-of-consciousness, motif, point-of-view, epiphany, and allegory in the novel, and pay particular attention to the masterful language Joyce uses.
     
    James Harville recently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory.  In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives.  Especially Mr. Harville’s.  

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping Room A
Alumni Association Board of Directors Meeting
American Politics Today and Our Country's Future
  • Thursday, Apr 30, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, April 2, 9, 16, 30
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     
    This course examines interest groups in American politics.  Historically viewed as private organizations dedicated to expressing the views of their members to policy makers, interest groups have exploded in numbers and types.  Their growing clout has impacted other traditional sources of informal power, particularly political parties, which have lost considerable control of nominations and elections.  We will trace the conditions that have facilitated interest group proliferation, the targets of interest groups, their techniques, and the outcomes of their efforts.  We will do so bearing in mind the original structure of American government and the intent of the Framers, taking note of the changing relationship between informal pressure and formal political structures.  With all of these developments, we are left with the questions: Do 21st century political organizations benefit the fabric of American democracy or thwart it?  Have they supplanted the roles of partisan organization in the political process or simply provided additional sets of messages to public policy makers?  Answering these fundamental questions will tell us much about American politics today, as well as the country’s future.     
     
    Dr. Larry Gerston is a Professor of Political Science at San Jose State University.  He specializes on the public policy process at the national and state levels and has written eleven books on politics.  His most recent book, Not So Golden After All: The Rise and Fall of California, assesses California's politics in the context of a complicated, contentious socio-economic environment.  Along with his academic responsibilities, Professor Gerston appears regularly as the political analyst at NBC Bay Area (the NBC television in northern California).  A native Californian, he is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Armchair Traveler: Cuba - So Near and Still So Far
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, April 20, 27
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    Cuba, ninety miles from the Florida Keys, is still a distant place for many United States citizens whose travel to the island is subject to the restrictive guidelines of the Office of Foreign Assets Control in the Treasury Department.  How did this happen? When will it change?  And, how can those in the U.S. travel legally to Cuba? This series on Cuba gives the background for the current situation and describes the incremental changes that are taking place in Cuban society.  It also introduces important Cuban voices that are not always “heard” in the U.S. eadlines about Cuba and the United States.
     
    Anne (Anita) Fountain was born in Argentina. She is Professor of Spanish at San José State University and is a specialist on the Cuban national hero, José Martí, and the influence of the United States on his life and work.  Recent books are: Disconnect/ Desencuentro (a bilingual edition of short stories by Nancy Alonso) 2012; Closed for Repairs (Trans. of Nancy Alonso’s Cerrado por reparación) 2007; Cuba on the Edge (A co-edited anthology of Cuban short fiction) 2007; and Versos Sencillos: A Dual Language Edition (José Martí, Translation, Introduction and Notes by Anne Fountain) 2005. She has written extensively on José Martí in both English and Spanish. Her book José Martí , the United States and Race  was published by the University Press of Florida in 2014. 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
  • Monday, Apr 27, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, April 20, 27
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

    Cuba, ninety miles from the Florida Keys, is still a distant place for many United States citizens whose travel to the island is subject to the restrictive guidelines of the Office of Foreign Assets Control in the Treasury Department.  How did this happen? When will it change?  And, how can those in the U.S. travel legally to Cuba? This series on Cuba gives the background for the current situation and describes the incremental changes that are taking place in Cuban society.  It also introduces important Cuban voices that are not always “heard” in the U.S. eadlines about Cuba and the United States.
     
    Anne (Anita) Fountain was born in Argentina. She is Professor of Spanish at San José State University and is a specialist on the Cuban national hero, José Martí, and the influence of the United States on his life and work.  Recent books are: Disconnect/ Desencuentro (a bilingual edition of short stories by Nancy Alonso) 2012; Closed for Repairs (Trans. of Nancy Alonso’s Cerrado por reparación) 2007; Cuba on the Edge (A co-edited anthology of Cuban short fiction) 2007; and Versos Sencillos: A Dual Language Edition (José Martí, Translation, Introduction and Notes by Anne Fountain) 2005. She has written extensively on José Martí in both English and Spanish. Her book José Martí , the United States and Race  was published by the University Press of Florida in 2014. 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
Basic Digital Photography (Studio Course)
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Location: Fine Arts Building B

    This exciting five-week class introduces students to basic digital camera functions such as aperture, shutter, and exposure. The class will emphasize elements of composition and how to create meaningful images. Students will also learn basic image enhancing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom 5.  This Osher studio course is offered in special partnership with the Art and Art History Department’s studio art program.
     
    Special Requirements:
    The course will be limited to 18 participants. Students must provide their own digital camera, but the Department of Art and Art History will provide other materials and supplies.  The first two class sessions will take place in the classroom; subsequent sessions will take place in the digital laboratory, both located in the Art and Art History building. 
     
    Renee Billingslea is a Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Department of Art & Art History, where she teaches photography.  She received both her M.F.A. (San Jose State) and B.F.A. (Southern Oregon University) in photography.  In addition to teaching, Renee is an exhibiting artist, who combines her talents in photography with textile and mixed media to create powerful works that address historical, racial and social issues.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room B
  • Friday, May 1, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Location: Fine Arts Building B

    This exciting five-week class introduces students to basic digital camera functions such as aperture, shutter, and exposure. The class will emphasize elements of composition and how to create meaningful images. Students will also learn basic image enhancing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom 5.  This Osher studio course is offered in special partnership with the Art and Art History Department’s studio art program.
     
    Special Requirements:
    The course will be limited to 18 participants. Students must provide their own digital camera, but the Department of Art and Art History will provide other materials and supplies.  The first two class sessions will take place in the classroom; subsequent sessions will take place in the digital laboratory, both located in the Art and Art History building. 
     
    Renee Billingslea is a Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Department of Art & Art History, where she teaches photography.  She received both her M.F.A. (San Jose State) and B.F.A. (Southern Oregon University) in photography.  In addition to teaching, Renee is an exhibiting artist, who combines her talents in photography with textile and mixed media to create powerful works that address historical, racial and social issues.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room B
  • Friday, May 8, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Friday, April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 8
    Location: Fine Arts Building B

    This exciting five-week class introduces students to basic digital camera functions such as aperture, shutter, and exposure. The class will emphasize elements of composition and how to create meaningful images. Students will also learn basic image enhancing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom 5.  This Osher studio course is offered in special partnership with the Art and Art History Department’s studio art program.
     
    Special Requirements:
    The course will be limited to 18 participants. Students must provide their own digital camera, but the Department of Art and Art History will provide other materials and supplies.  The first two class sessions will take place in the classroom; subsequent sessions will take place in the digital laboratory, both located in the Art and Art History building. 
     
    Renee Billingslea is a Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Department of Art & Art History, where she teaches photography.  She received both her M.F.A. (San Jose State) and B.F.A. (Southern Oregon University) in photography.  In addition to teaching, Renee is an exhibiting artist, who combines her talents in photography with textile and mixed media to create powerful works that address historical, racial and social issues.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room B
Broncos Go Social: First Time Home Buyers Seminar
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 from 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM

    Join the SCU Alumni Association for a seminar on first time home owners. Two guest speakers specializing in real estate and home mortgages will discuss many topics pertinent to buying your first home. Enjoy hosted appetizers and beverages while learning the ins and outs of purchasing your first home.

    RSVP Today!

     


    Cost: $5
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Buck Bannan Awards
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 1:30 PM

     The Business Ethics Partnership brings together executives and scholars in a forum designed to increase the members’ knowledge about effectively managing ethics in business organizations. Founded in 2003, the partnership currently includes 11 business organizations and 10 faculty members who share the goals of honing ethics and compliance policies at member organizations and advancing the state of business ethics knowledge.

    Business Ethics Partnership Members Only


    Location: Lucas Hall, Forbes Family Conference Center
Business Ethics Partnership Meeting
  • Wednesday, Oct 7, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 1:30 PM

    The Business Ethics Partnership brings together executives and scholars in a forum designed to increase the members’ knowledge about effectively managing ethics in business organizations. Founded in 2003, the partnership currently includes 11 business organizations and 10 faculty members who share the goals of honing ethics and compliance policies at member organizations and advancing the state of business ethics knowledge.

    Business Ethics Partnership Members Only


    Location: Lucas Hall, Forbes Family Conference Center
Campus Tour - Friday
Campus Tour - Saturday
Chicago Annual Night at the Cubs
  • Thursday, Aug 6, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

     

    Join us for our Annual Night at the Cubs on Thursday, August 6th as they take on the defending world champions in the San Francisco Giants. We are finalizing a pre-game meet up, so check back soon for more information!


    Cost: $35 Per Person
    Location:
         Wrigley Field
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : Amit Sharma : Google
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is Amit Sharma, of Google.

    Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universlaly accessible and useful.


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : Greg Moore : Fit3D
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is Greg Moore, of Fit3D.

    Our Founder, Greg, was helping to support his mother as she was going through a weight loss program to get ready for her daughter's wedding.  Greg's mother was working with a great personal trainer and nutritionist to approach weight loss through healthy means.  Greg saw his mother every few months and was astonished by how much her body looks, shape, and measurements were changing, but unfortunately even more astonished by how demotivated his mother was because her weight was not decreasing.  She understood that her body was building lean muscle while shedding fat, but couldn't get over her lack of weight change.

    Greg quickly realized that this is a problem that more than 217 million dieting Americans face every year.  He knew that the world needed a solution that would show all of the amazing progress that their bodies were making as they did the hard part by exercising the right way and more often and through healthier eating, but more importantly Greg knew that this solution needed to be in the hands of the thousands of trainers, nutritionists, and coaches that helped people like his mom reach her goals.  It was this realization that planted the Fit3D seed.


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : John Hogan : TeenForce
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is John Hogan, of TeenForce.

    TeenForce is a social enterprise helping solve the youth employment crisis by meeting the hiring needs of business. Our self-sustaining staffing agency model offers businesses a convenient and cost-effective platform to employ enthusiastic and well prepared young workers. We provide youth with work readiness training, skills development and job placement services.  

    Our program is open to all youth ages 14 – 20.  For current and former foster youth,  we extend our age range to 24. 


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : Kevin Beals : RetailNext
  • Monday, Apr 27, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is Kevin Beals, of RetailNext.

    RetailNext is the market leader in Big Data solutions for brick-and-mortar challenges. Our patented technology delivers comprehensive, real-time analytics that empowers worldwide retailers, shopping centers, and manufacturers to collect, analyze, and visualize in-store data.


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : Nicole Ruccolo : StyleBar
  • Monday, Jun 1, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is Nicole Ruccolo, of StyleBar.

    Stylebar is an app that allows you to:

    Partner with your dedicated stylist, manage the edited options, and get immediate feedback.

    Collaborate with your stylist via in-app messenger to help you edit through all the fashion websites. You can save time and find pieces you actually love. 

    Based on your stylist’s picks, create the look you like with a touch of a finger. Save your looks or send them to your stylist for their recommendation.


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series : Tony Pollace : Armored Mobility
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.   Registration is not required, join us -- all are welcome. 

    The speaker this evening is Tony Pollace, of Armored Mobility.

    Armored Mobility Incorporated's (AMI) objective is to design and manufacture innovative, cost effective threat management solutions for law enforcement and military personnel.

    AMI's current product portfolio includes a variety of body armor, a multi-function shield and custom architectural and vehicle solutions. 


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 107
Class of 1950 Reunion Lunch
Class of 1955 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1960 Reunion Dinner
Class of 1965 Golden Anniversary Dinner
Class of 1965 Kickoff Dinner
Class of 1970 Reunion Party
Class of 1975 Reunion Party
Class of 1980 Reunion Party
Class of 1985 Reunion Party
Class of 1990 Reunion Party
Class of 1995 Reunion Party
Class of 2000 Reunion Party
Class of 2005 Reunion Party
Class of 2010 Reunion Party
Combined Choral Concert
Commencement Recital
Conflict Resolution Workshop
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    This workshop will address themes such as why conflict is so difficult, listening skills and effective conflict resolution skills.

    The workshop will be led by Elizabeth Link, Attorney and Mediator. 


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
CPSY x550: Secrets in Psychotherapy: Concealment, Disclosure, and Therapeutic Success
  • Saturday, Jun 13, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x550 - Secrets in Psychotherapy: Concealment, Disclosure, and Therapeutic Success

    DATE: Saturday, June 13

    TIME: 9-4 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

    Course meets the qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Register Here!

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Most therapists have witnessed how a client’s disclosure of troubling personal information can often be a turning point in therapy, but the process of uncovering long-hidden areas of experience challenges both client and therapist. Secrets that are most tightly held, such as sexual abuse, rape, self-hatred, extramarital affairs, disenfranchised grief, and serious medical conditions, including HIV-status, are painful and often stigmatized experiences. Navigating this world of secrets and helping clients negotiate conflicts surrounding disclosure are hallmarks of the effective therapist.
     
    This one-day seminar will look at secrets in everyday clinical practice and identify
    therapeutic techniques and relationship qualities that can bring the dialectic of concealment and disclosure into the center of therapeutic action. Recent work on self-concealment, trauma disclosure, covert processes in therapy, therapist and client disclosure, and end-of-life closure will inform lectures and discussion.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dale G. Larson, Ph.D. is a Fulbright Scholar, a Fellow in the American Psychological Association (Division 17, Counseling Psychology, and Division 38, Health Psychology), and a licensed clinical psychologist and marriage and family therapist.  His academic interests bridge counseling and health psychology, including self-concealment, stress management, process experiential therapy, and a variety of issues in the end-of-life area, such as grief counseling research, interdisciplinary team development, and advanced illness care coordination. A recognized national leader in end-of-life care and training, Larson was Senior Editor and a contributing author for the Robert Wood Johnson-funded national newspaper series, Finding Our Way: Living with Dying in America, which reached 7 million Americans.   

    Larson has published extensively in his areas of interest, and is the editor of the text, Teaching Psychological Skills: Models for Giving Psychology Away, and the author of the award-winning book, The Helper's Journey:  Working With People Facing Grief, Loss, and Life-Threatening  Illness.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x648: The Heart of Recovery From Addictions - The Patient Experience
  • Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x648: The Heart of Recovery From Addictions – The Patient Experience

    DATE: May 2nd

    TIME: 9:30-4:30PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160(Subject to change)

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

    Register Here »

     

     


    Course meets the qualifications for 5.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

     WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Successful recovery from any addiction involves a transformation of the entire person. At times the psychological community, recovery community, and treatment community are at odds over how to best address the needs of addicts and alcoholics. This course aims at offering an overview of the most effective treatments available to allow a person the opportunity to experience real peace of mind in recovery and freedom from the addictive prison. Included in the course is understanding the strength and shadow side of the current approaches to addressing the disease of addiction. The course will include personal stories of the teachers, guest speakers, along with real – in the trenches shared experiences from working in a treatment facility that now treats 500 alcoholics and addicts each year. Also discussed in this course is the power of self-compassion and positive psychology and its vital role in allowing for complete recovery, in body, mind and spirit, from any addiction. There will also be very many down to earth – hands on – practical skill building opportunities for people seeking concrete ways to help foster positive change for alcoholics and addicts they may work with.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    - Understand the most effective treatments in body, mind, and spirit for
      alcoholics and addicts
    - How to implement the most effective treatments as a therapist (see above for
      all topics that will be covered)
    - Informal question and answer periods will guide assessment to assure students
      are tracking with the material presented.
    - The opportunity to actually do some of the assignments typically given to
       patients in a treatment setting to taste the transformative power recovery can
       have for individuals trying to get clean and sober.
     

    TARGET AUDIENCE
    Anyone currently in graduate school training in the helping professions, or licensed therapists and social workers or interns seeking to understand what really works for helping alcoholics and addicts get and maintain, long-term contented sobriety.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Brad Koch, MFT has had a variety of life experiences that have led him to work full-time as an MFT treating addictions since 2005. His life journey has involved backpacking adventures across New Zealand, 264 skydives, becoming a successful tenured 6th grade school teacher at one point in his life , discovering the transformative power of recovery for himself in 2003 through three months in residence at the Hazelden-Betty Ford foundation – one of the best treatment centers on earth, getting a masters degree in counseling psychology from Santa Clara University in 2006 and now has personally established education curriculum in use at Kaiser Permanente’s Chemical Dependency Recovery Program in Cupertino, where he has worked since 2006. Also, an avid meditator and student of mindfulness-based stress reduction, Brad has enjoyed going on silent meditation retreats at Spirit Rock in Marin County and sees the practices of mindfulness, love, and compassion as central to the recovery journey. He is married to a wonderful woman he met in graduate school at Santa Clara University in 2004 and they have two amazing kids.

     

    Guest speakers include:

    Brian Penrose, MFT, a SCU alumni, will be discussing dual diagnosis
    His bio:http://mydoctor.kaiserpermanente.org/ncal/provider/brianpenrose/about/professional?ctab=About+Me&to=1

     
    Len Depaolo, MFT is a manager at Kaiser's Chemical Dependency Recovery Program with decades of experience working with addictions in a treatment center, and in private practice, he will discuss several things, including long term issues that can come up with longer term sobriety.
    His bio is here:
     
    Keith Nelson, LCSW, is well known in the area as an expert in Chemical Dependency Treatment. He is also a manager at Kaiser's Chemical Dependency Recovery Program and in private practice. He has specialty training in DBT and will be discussing the role of DBT for people recovering from addictions.
    His Kaiser bio is here:
     
     

     

     

     


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x680: Counseling for Grief and Loss: Innovations in Theory and Technique
  • Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x680 - Counseling for Grief and Loss: Innovations in Theory and Technique

    DATE: May 16th

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160(Subject to change)

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

    Course meets the qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    Register Here!

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This workshop is an intensive introduction to counseling and therapy issues encountered when working with people facing grief, loss, and life-threatening illness.
     
    Topics covered will include:
    • Theories of attachment and loss
    • Normal grief reaction and the tasks of grief
    • Recent research and theory on complicated mourning
    • Unresolved grief as an underlying clinical issue
    • Grief and family systems
    • Therapeutic interventions (existential, cognitive-behavioral, and process experiential) with people facing grief, loss, or life-threatening illness
    • Interdisciplinary team work in end-of-life care
    • Facilitating end-of-life conversations
    •  Innovation in end-of-life care and antidotes to therapist burnout.
     
    Skill-building exercises are an important part of this course. 

     

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dale G. Larson, Ph.D. (U. C. Berkeley) is a Professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University, where he directs the graduate Health Psychology Program. A national leader in end-of-life research, theory, and training, he is a Fulbright Scholar, a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, and the recipient of numerous awards for his contributions to end-of-life care. The author of the award winning book, The Helper's Journey: Working With People Facing Grief, Loss, and Life-Threatening Illness, he has published widely on counseling and health issues, self-concealment , stress theory, and counseling skills, and has had a clinical practice for more than 25 years. His undergraduate degree in psychology is from the University of Chicago, and his doctorate is in clinical psychology from U. C. Berkeley. Dale Larson’s ability to translate theory and research into effective clinical practice has made him a popular speaker at national and international conferences.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x762 : Courageous Conversations about Culture
  • Saturday, May 30, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x762 : Courageous Conversations about Culture

    DATE: May 30th  (Register by May 20th)

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160(Subject to change)

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

    Course meets the qualifications for 5.25 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Register Here!

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    In this workshop, we propose an 8-step model for how to effectively engage in Courageous Conversations about culture and diversity. Our approach provides practical and enriching tools that further the concept of broaching cultural issues (Day-Vines, et al., 2007) in clinical settings, supervisory relationships, the classroom, and organizations. As well, these are skills that also require engagement at the community level. We also facilitate experiential small group exercises that cultivate the essential skills that ultimately help us engage, connect, and build lasting relationships necessary for intimate and genuine dialogue regarding culture.

    Target Audience

    Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors, Graduate Students and Social Workers

    INSTRUCTOR BIOS

    Alicia del Prado, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at The Wright Institute in Berkeley, CA. She received her B.S. in Psychology from Santa Clara University, her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Washington State University, and did her predoctoral and postdoctoral training at UC Berkeley. Dr. del Prado has a psychotherapy private practice in Berkeley specializing in culturally competent work with diverse clients and providing clinical services to university students with anxiety, depression, and trauma.

    Anatasia S. Kim, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at The Wright Institute in Berkeley, CA. She received her B.A. in Psychology from UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a minor in Developmental Psychology at UCLA. She is a National Ronald McNair Scholar, recipient of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship as well as the Okura Mental Health Fellowship. In addition to teaching, she has a private practice in Berkeley specializing in treating adolescents/young adults with anxiety disorders, depression, and neurocognitive deficits (e.g., Asperger?s Syndrome) using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x932: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x932– Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy

    Saturday, April 25th, 9-4PM, Rm. 160, $168
    ** 6 Continuing Education Hours **

    Register Here!

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    Tired of listening to someone spew information at you all day? This day-long interactive workshop will provide you with the information you need, but will also give you a chance to sharpen your own ethical decision-making skills at the same time. We will discuss issues of informed consent, confidentiality, reporting laws, client rights and counselor responsibilities, etc. The format will include case studies, brief presentations, discussion, and didactic exercises designed to help you explore your own values and ethical framework. This workshop is tailed specifically for MFT’s.
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO
     
    A former Jesuit, Donald St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministries and Counseling Psychology.
    St. Louis completed his D.Min. from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1986. He is the Founder and Director of The California Institute for Sexual Recovery in San Francisco and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in San Francisco and Santa Clara. A former Jesuit, St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology and Pastoral Ministries.

     

     

    Cost: $96/$168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Day of the Children
  • Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM

    Join the Santa Clara University Alumni Association and the Chicano Latino and Asian Pacific Islander Chapters for Day of the Children 2015!  The outdoor celebration will take place in the gardens behind Donohoe Alumni House.  Kids of all ages will enjoy carnival style games, interactive educational displays, face painting, live music, and an assortment of food and drinks.  All are welcome (parents, grandparents, non-parents) to the enjoy our version of the celebration of children! 

    RSVP Online

     


    Cost: $10 Adult, Free for Children Under 12
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Determining the Value of Your Antiques and Collectibles
  • Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Saturday, May 16
    Location: Daly Science 206

    Have you ever wondered how much your treasures – whether inherited or purchased at a flea market - might be worth?  In this two-hour class, we’ll discuss six factors that make something worth more,  or less.  Class participants are urged to bring along an object for review applying your newfound knowledge.
     
    Steven Wayne Yvaska has been a collector since he was nine years old.  Originally from  Boston, Yvaska completed both his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Syracuse.  Since the mid-1970’s, Yvaska has been a speaker and lecturer at historical societies, study groups, museums, antiques clubs, libraries, colleges and universities.  He presents programs on topics as varied as silver, American art pottery, Halloween memorabilia, World Fair souvenirs,  pre-1920 postcards, English ceramics and more.  Steve may be best known for his long-running column “The Seasoned Collector,” which appears exclusively in the San Jose Mercury News and most Media News Group publications. His articles and stories have been reprinted in newsletters, journals, and bulletins.

    Cost: 40.00
Dr. Ursula King Event
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2015
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers
  • Saturday, May 9, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers

    DATE: Saturday May 09 *Must register by Wednesday, April 29st

    TIME: 8AM-5PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. TBD

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement

    Register for Spring »

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse; staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location:
         Room TBD
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)
  • Monday, Apr 27, 2015 to Friday, May 8, 2015

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)

    DATE: April 27 through May 8, 2015 *Must register by April 15

    TIME: Any time that works for you.

    LOCATION: Anywhere you have access to the internet.

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement.

    Register for Spring »

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Online
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Friday, April 24th 2015

    Time: 8AM-12PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $55

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $55
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Friday, Jun 12, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Friday, June 12 2015

    Time: 8AM-12PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $55

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $55
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x992 SHRM-CP & SHRM-SCP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, May 16, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x992 SHRM-CP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): May 7, 8, & 9 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): May 14 & 15 from 6PM - 9PM, May 16 from 8AM - 1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 135(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Joan Torne has been in the Human Resources field for more than 12 years. She is currently the Associate Director of Human Resources at Santa Clara University. She received her Bachelor’s degree in International Business at the University of San Francisco, her Master’s degree in Sociology at San Jose State University and her doctoral degree in Organization and Leadership from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests are leadership in higher education, Asian Pacific American leaders in higher education, diversity in higher education, strategic planning in higher education, bureaucratic organizations, emotions at work, work and family, women at work, social inequalities, and human resources management. She also holds a Professional Human Resources Certificate (PHR) since 2007. Dr. Torne has taught Human Resources courses as a lecturer and a mentor at the Silicon Valley School of Management at San Jose State University. She is committed in upholding personal and organizational continuous improvement and an advocate for equal access to higher education.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 135
EDUC x992 SHRM-CP & SHRM-SCP Certification Prep Course
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 8:00 AM to Saturday, Jun 13, 2015 at 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    EDUC x992 SHRM-CP™ Certification Prep Course

    Date & Time: 
    Week 1(In Class): June 4, 5, & 6 from 8-5PM each day
    Week 2(Online): June 11 & 12 from 6PM - 9PM, June 13 from 8AM - 1PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 135(In class) & Online

    Cost: $1540

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has recently established the new SHRM Certification to replace the PHR and SPHR certifications currently held by HR professionals. The new curriculum created by SHRM provides the essential information to pass and obtain the new SHRM-CPTM credential. This course covers the SHRM body of Competency and Knowledge (BoCK). The SHRM Learning System is included in the cost of this course.

     

    HR Competencies

    HR Expertise (HR Knowledge), Relationship Management, Consultation, Leadership and Navigation, Communication, Global and Cultural Effectiveness, Ethical Practice, Business Acumen, Critical Evaluation

    HR Knowledge Domains
    o   People
    o   Talent Acquisition
    o   Employee Engagement
    o   Learning & Development
    o   Total Rewards
    o   Organization
    o   Structure of the HR Function
    o   Organizational Effectiveness and Development
    o   Workforce Management
    o   Employee Relations
    o   Technology and Data
    o   Workplace
    o   HR in the Global Context
    o   Diversity and Inclusion
    o   Risk Management
    o   Corporate Social Responsibility
    o   Employment Law and Regulation (U.S. only)
    o   Strategy
    o   Business and HR Strategy

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Joan Torne has been in the Human Resources field for more than 12 years. She is currently the Associate Director of Human Resources at Santa Clara University. She received her Bachelor’s degree in International Business at the University of San Francisco, her Master’s degree in Sociology at San Jose State University and her doctoral degree in Organization and Leadership from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests are leadership in higher education, Asian Pacific American leaders in higher education, diversity in higher education, strategic planning in higher education, bureaucratic organizations, emotions at work, work and family, women at work, social inequalities, and human resources management. She also holds a Professional Human Resources Certificate (PHR) since 2007. Dr. Torne has taught Human Resources courses as a lecturer and a mentor at the Silicon Valley School of Management at San Jose State University. She is committed in upholding personal and organizational continuous improvement and an advocate for equal access to higher education.


    Cost: 1540
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room: 135
Employer Advice for Getting Hired
Employer Info Session: Apple - Finance
  • Thursday, Apr 23, 2015 at 6:00 PM

     Representatives from Apple will share information with freshman and sophomore students about their Summer 2016 finance internships.


    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         B&C
Employer Info Session: Fisher Investments
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 6:00 PM

     Hear from Fisher Investments representatives sharing information about the organization and their opportunities. 


    Location: Benson Center
         Conference Room 21
Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers
Film & Discussion: Pray the Devil Back to Hell
  • Thursday, Apr 23, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    When: Thursday, April 23, 2015; 7:00-9:00 PM
    Where: Wiegand Room, Vari Hall 102

    Sponsored by: SCU Anti-Human Trafficking Study Group & Local Religions Project (Both of the Religious Studies Department)

    The film documents Christian & Muslim nonviolent actions of Liberian women striving for sustainability & peace. Discussants include: Prof. Harry Odamtten (History); SCU Anti-Human Trafficking Group & YOU.

    In compliance with the ADA/504, please direct your accommodation requests to: Religious Studies Department at 408-554-4547 or by email vgonzalez@scu.edu


    Location: Vari Hall
First Friday Mass and Lunch
Five Cities: An Introduction to Ancient Greece
  • Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     
    This course is an introduction to ancient Greece presented as a journey to five different cities.  We begin with Mycenae, where we examine the ruins of the late Bronze Age and investigate the culture that inspired the Homeric epic poems.  Next stop is Delphi, home of Apollo's oracle, where we explore Greek religion.  Our third stop is Sparta, and an overview of what made the Spartans so memorably different from their fellow Greeks.  The fourth stop takes us to the jewel of the ancient Greek world:  5th century Athens.  We end our journey in Egyptian Alexandria, which preserved the legacy of classical Greece as it created its own identity as the new cosmopolitan center of the Greek world in the wake of Alexander the Great.
     
    Barbara Clayton has taught at Oberlin College, Santa Clara University, and Stanford, where she has 14 years’ experience teaching a wide range of courses in their Continuing Studies program.  Clayton received an MA from Princeton in French literature and a PhD from Stanford in classics.  She specializes in Homeric epic.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     
    This course is an introduction to ancient Greece presented as a journey to five different cities.  We begin with Mycenae, where we examine the ruins of the late Bronze Age and investigate the culture that inspired the Homeric epic poems.  Next stop is Delphi, home of Apollo's oracle, where we explore Greek religion.  Our third stop is Sparta, and an overview of what made the Spartans so memorably different from their fellow Greeks.  The fourth stop takes us to the jewel of the ancient Greek world:  5th century Athens.  We end our journey in Egyptian Alexandria, which preserved the legacy of classical Greece as it created its own identity as the new cosmopolitan center of the Greek world in the wake of Alexander the Great.
     
    Barbara Clayton has taught at Oberlin College, Santa Clara University, and Stanford, where she has 14 years’ experience teaching a wide range of courses in their Continuing Studies program.  Clayton received an MA from Princeton in French literature and a PhD from Stanford in classics.  She specializes in Homeric epic.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
FoodCrunch: Innovation You Can Taste
  • Thursday, Apr 30, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM

     The Food & Agribusiness Institute, in partnership with international honor society Beta Gamma Sigma will host a forum to recognize and promote entrepreneurial growth and major investments in California's food industry. The event is intended to help both undergraduate and graduate students across disciplines understand the approaches that new and established food companies are taking to achieve a strong, sustainable food system. Specifically we aim to outline how entrepreneurs in this field develop thoughtful products, obtain funding, and find business models that can continue to have an impact.


    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Fusion: Santa Clara University Choirs and Orchestra
  • Friday, Jun 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The final concert of the year is a collaboration between the Santa Clara University choirs and orchestras. The evening’s program is eclectic and features selections from Mozart’sVespers.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
German Art Before, During and After Expressionism: 1870 - 1933
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, May 5, 12, 19, 26 and June 2
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160

    In this series of five lectures, Professor Barton will give an overview of German Modern and Modernist art, from the late nineteenth century up through the "roaring twenties."  The lectures will provide a close look at specific artists, including the Impressionist Max Liebermann, the German Expressionists Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Vasily Kandinsky, and the artist of the "New Objectivity" Otto Dix.  We will also discuss modernist architecture and the Bauhaus.  Finally, we will compare this era in Germany with that in France and discuss the unique features of German art and culture.

    Brigid Barton is Professor Emerita, Department of Art and Art History, Santa Clara University.  She specializes in the field of European Modernist art, and has taught previous courses in this area through Santa Clara University's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program, the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford, and the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center.  Professor Barton received her PhD in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, May 5, 12, 19, 26 and June 2
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160

    In this series of five lectures, Professor Barton will give an overview of German Modern and Modernist art, from the late nineteenth century up through the "roaring twenties."  The lectures will provide a close look at specific artists, including the Impressionist Max Liebermann, the German Expressionists Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Vasily Kandinsky, and the artist of the "New Objectivity" Otto Dix.  We will also discuss modernist architecture and the Bauhaus.  Finally, we will compare this era in Germany with that in France and discuss the unique features of German art and culture.

    Brigid Barton is Professor Emerita, Department of Art and Art History, Santa Clara University.  She specializes in the field of European Modernist art, and has taught previous courses in this area through Santa Clara University's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program, the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford, and the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center.  Professor Barton received her PhD in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, May 5, 12, 19, 26 and June 2
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160

    In this series of five lectures, Professor Barton will give an overview of German Modern and Modernist art, from the late nineteenth century up through the "roaring twenties."  The lectures will provide a close look at specific artists, including the Impressionist Max Liebermann, the German Expressionists Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Vasily Kandinsky, and the artist of the "New Objectivity" Otto Dix.  We will also discuss modernist architecture and the Bauhaus.  Finally, we will compare this era in Germany with that in France and discuss the unique features of German art and culture.

    Brigid Barton is Professor Emerita, Department of Art and Art History, Santa Clara University.  She specializes in the field of European Modernist art, and has taught previous courses in this area through Santa Clara University's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program, the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford, and the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center.  Professor Barton received her PhD in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, May 26, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, May 5, 12, 19, 26 and June 2
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160

    In this series of five lectures, Professor Barton will give an overview of German Modern and Modernist art, from the late nineteenth century up through the "roaring twenties."  The lectures will provide a close look at specific artists, including the Impressionist Max Liebermann, the German Expressionists Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Vasily Kandinsky, and the artist of the "New Objectivity" Otto Dix.  We will also discuss modernist architecture and the Bauhaus.  Finally, we will compare this era in Germany with that in France and discuss the unique features of German art and culture.

    Brigid Barton is Professor Emerita, Department of Art and Art History, Santa Clara University.  She specializes in the field of European Modernist art, and has taught previous courses in this area through Santa Clara University's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program, the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford, and the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center.  Professor Barton received her PhD in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, May 5, 12, 19, 26 and June 2
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160

    In this series of five lectures, Professor Barton will give an overview of German Modern and Modernist art, from the late nineteenth century up through the "roaring twenties."  The lectures will provide a close look at specific artists, including the Impressionist Max Liebermann, the German Expressionists Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Vasily Kandinsky, and the artist of the "New Objectivity" Otto Dix.  We will also discuss modernist architecture and the Bauhaus.  Finally, we will compare this era in Germany with that in France and discuss the unique features of German art and culture.

    Brigid Barton is Professor Emerita, Department of Art and Art History, Santa Clara University.  She specializes in the field of European Modernist art, and has taught previous courses in this area through Santa Clara University's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Stanford University's Continuing Studies Program, the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts at Stanford, and the Palo Alto Jewish Community Center.  Professor Barton received her PhD in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Gianera Society Lunch
GRADUATION PICNIC 2015
  • Saturday, Jun 13, 2015 from 11:30 AM to 3:00 PM

     Celebrate with fellow graduates, family & friends at the Alumni Graduation Picnic on Bellomy Field.  Tickets will be available to purchase starting April 6, 2015.

     Click here to make reservations for Graduates and their families.

     


    Cost: $50
    Location: Bellomy Field
Great and Colorful Opera Divas
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Beverly Sills, Maria Callas, Bidu Sayo, Lily Pons, Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price - these are just a few of the great female stars that have graced opera performance history. Their voices thrilled millions and their lives were the stuff of soap-opera legend. This class explores the artistry and personalities of these unforgettable, larger-than-life divas.
     
    Kay Kleinerman, Ed.D, is Managing Director of Music in the Schools, a non-profit organization that provides music education to K – 7 students in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto/East Menlo Park.  She is also Adjunct Faculty at Sofia University, and has taught for the Santa Clara University, UC Santa Cruz and San Jose State Osher programs, as well as the San Francisco Community Music Center.  She is an experienced professional singer/actor, stage director, music director, and producer, and has served in leadership positions in several non-profit arts and arts education organizations.  As well, Kay has a thriving private voice studio, and is the Music Director at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Beverly Sills, Maria Callas, Bidu Sayo, Lily Pons, Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price - these are just a few of the great female stars that have graced opera performance history. Their voices thrilled millions and their lives were the stuff of soap-opera legend. This class explores the artistry and personalities of these unforgettable, larger-than-life divas.
     
    Kay Kleinerman, Ed.D, is Managing Director of Music in the Schools, a non-profit organization that provides music education to K – 7 students in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto/East Menlo Park.  She is also Adjunct Faculty at Sofia University, and has taught for the Santa Clara University, UC Santa Cruz and San Jose State Osher programs, as well as the San Francisco Community Music Center.  She is an experienced professional singer/actor, stage director, music director, and producer, and has served in leadership positions in several non-profit arts and arts education organizations.  As well, Kay has a thriving private voice studio, and is the Music Director at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Beverly Sills, Maria Callas, Bidu Sayo, Lily Pons, Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price - these are just a few of the great female stars that have graced opera performance history. Their voices thrilled millions and their lives were the stuff of soap-opera legend. This class explores the artistry and personalities of these unforgettable, larger-than-life divas.
     
    Kay Kleinerman, Ed.D, is Managing Director of Music in the Schools, a non-profit organization that provides music education to K – 7 students in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto/East Menlo Park.  She is also Adjunct Faculty at Sofia University, and has taught for the Santa Clara University, UC Santa Cruz and San Jose State Osher programs, as well as the San Francisco Community Music Center.  She is an experienced professional singer/actor, stage director, music director, and producer, and has served in leadership positions in several non-profit arts and arts education organizations.  As well, Kay has a thriving private voice studio, and is the Music Director at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Jun 1, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Beverly Sills, Maria Callas, Bidu Sayo, Lily Pons, Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price - these are just a few of the great female stars that have graced opera performance history. Their voices thrilled millions and their lives were the stuff of soap-opera legend. This class explores the artistry and personalities of these unforgettable, larger-than-life divas.
     
    Kay Kleinerman, Ed.D, is Managing Director of Music in the Schools, a non-profit organization that provides music education to K – 7 students in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto/East Menlo Park.  She is also Adjunct Faculty at Sofia University, and has taught for the Santa Clara University, UC Santa Cruz and San Jose State Osher programs, as well as the San Francisco Community Music Center.  She is an experienced professional singer/actor, stage director, music director, and producer, and has served in leadership positions in several non-profit arts and arts education organizations.  As well, Kay has a thriving private voice studio, and is the Music Director at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Monday, Jun 8, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Beverly Sills, Maria Callas, Bidu Sayo, Lily Pons, Marilyn Horne, Leontyne Price - these are just a few of the great female stars that have graced opera performance history. Their voices thrilled millions and their lives were the stuff of soap-opera legend. This class explores the artistry and personalities of these unforgettable, larger-than-life divas.
     
    Kay Kleinerman, Ed.D, is Managing Director of Music in the Schools, a non-profit organization that provides music education to K – 7 students in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto/East Menlo Park.  She is also Adjunct Faculty at Sofia University, and has taught for the Santa Clara University, UC Santa Cruz and San Jose State Osher programs, as well as the San Francisco Community Music Center.  She is an experienced professional singer/actor, stage director, music director, and producer, and has served in leadership positions in several non-profit arts and arts education organizations.  As well, Kay has a thriving private voice studio, and is the Music Director at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Redwood City.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Greater Los Angeles National College Fair - Pasadena, CA
Homecoming Picnic
I need a job! Job Search Strategies to Help You Get One
Independence Day: Administrative holiday/Library Closed
Interview like a Superstar! - Webinar
  • Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

     

    If interviewing still makes you weak in the knees, develop a new strategy.

    Learn how to prep for an interview and craft answers to common interview questions to boost your confidence. This is a great opportunity to ask questions.

    Join the Career Center and the Alumni Association on Wednesday April 22 from 5:30 pm PDT to 6:30 pm PDT via WebEx for an interactive webinar. Come prepared with your questions about interviewing.

    *Space is limited, pre-registration required. Register now to get the event password!

     

     

     


    Cost: No Charge
Introduction to Geocaching
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM

    Register Here 

    Class Session:  Wednesday, April 29
    9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Optional Field Exercise:  Saturday, May 2 (a maximum of 9 participants)
    10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 
    Location:  TBA
    Cost:  $25 
     
    Looking for an activity that is intellectually challenging, gets you out and about, often to nearby places you’ve never been? Try geocaching! In geocaching you use your personal Global Positioning Satellite receiver (GPSr) or a GPS enabled smartphone to take you to precise locations where someone has hidden a cache, which contains a log book and perhaps items for trade. With thousands of caches hidden in the greater Bay Area, there are lots of opportunities for the geocacher. Through the free services of www.geocaching.com and the geocaching.com app for your smartphone, you can look for caches that might be interesting to find, log your finds, and share experiences with fellow geocachers. Many caches are located in flat terrain, with some of them wheelchair accessible. Geocaching is an excellent family or multi-generational activity, kids are surprisingly good at finding caches. The class consists of an interactive, approximately 90 min. lecture. There will also be, attendance limited, field exercises on Saturday to gain practical experience in finding caches.

     

    Jay McCauley (Teamspider3 on www.geocaching.com) is an active geocacher with well over 800 finds. Jay has taught classes for the UCSC Extension, SJSU OLLI, and has been an invited speaker and tutorial presenter at meetings worldwide. In real life, Jay is a retired software engineering director. His Ph.D. is from The Ohio State University in Computer and Information Science.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here 

    Class Session:  Wednesday, April 29
    9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
    Location:  Loyola Hall, Room 160

    Optional Field Exercise:  Saturday, May 2 (a maximum of 9 participants)
    10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. 
    Location:  TBA
    Cost:  $25 
     
    Looking for an activity that is intellectually challenging, gets you out and about, often to nearby places you’ve never been? Try geocaching! In geocaching you use your personal Global Positioning Satellite receiver (GPSr) or a GPS enabled smartphone to take you to precise locations where someone has hidden a cache, which contains a log book and perhaps items for trade. With thousands of caches hidden in the greater Bay Area, there are lots of opportunities for the geocacher. Through the free services of www.geocaching.com and the geocaching.com app for your smartphone, you can look for caches that might be interesting to find, log your finds, and share experiences with fellow geocachers. Many caches are located in flat terrain, with some of them wheelchair accessible. Geocaching is an excellent family or multi-generational activity, kids are surprisingly good at finding caches. The class consists of an interactive, approximately 90 min. lecture. There will also be, attendance limited, field exercises on Saturday to gain practical experience in finding caches.

     

    Jay McCauley (Teamspider3 on www.geocaching.com) is an active geocacher with well over 800 finds. Jay has taught classes for the UCSC Extension, SJSU OLLI, and has been an invited speaker and tutorial presenter at meetings worldwide. In real life, Jay is a retired software engineering director. His Ph.D. is from The Ohio State University in Computer and Information Science.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Thursday, Apr 30, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
  • Monday, Jun 1, 2015 from 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM

     Learn how to understand and interpret the results from your iStart Strong assessment and learn about additional resources and next steps.

    Registration & completion of iStart Strong assessment required.  


    Location: Benson Center, Career Center
         Conference Room
Jazz Band/Combo Concert
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Jazz Band and Combo present concerts throughout the academic year. These exciting programs feature music in the American jazz tradition from the bright energy of the Big Band era all the way forward to the jazz music of today. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jesuit Restoration Lecture Series Event by Dr. Ursula King: "Following the Road of Fire": The Emergence of Teilhard de Chardin's Panchristic Mysticism During the First World War
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 at 7:00 PM

    Sixty years after the death of the great Jesuit paleontologist and theologian, Dr. Ursula King will present an examination of his roots, of his mysticism, and of his importance for contemporary issues of science and religion.

    Ursula King, STL (Paris), MA (Delhi), PhD (London), FRSA, is Professor Emerita of Theology and Religious Studies and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Bristol. Educated in Germany, France, India and England, she has lectured all over the world and published numerous books and articles, especially on gender issues in religions, method and theory, modern Hinduism, interfaith dialogue, spirituality, and on the French thinker, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. She is also the author of the soon-to-be published Spirit of Fire: The Life and Vision of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (revised edition).

    Sponsored by: Santa Clara University: Office of the President, Jesuit School of Theology, Religious Studies Department, Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, Program in Catholic Studies, Santa Clara Jesuit Community, and by the Catholic Community at Stanford.


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
Job Search Lab
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 from 4:15 PM to 4:45 PM

     

    • Customize your job search using the fastest growing job search engines on the web
    • Set up searches on BroncoLink that yield results!
    • Learn strategies for boosting the number of targeted jobs arriving in your inbox daily

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 from 4:15 PM to 4:45 PM

     

    • Customize your job search using the fastest growing job search engines on the web
    • Set up searches on BroncoLink that yield results!
    • Learn strategies for boosting the number of targeted jobs arriving in your inbox daily

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Tuesday, May 26, 2015 from 4:15 PM to 4:45 PM

     

    • Customize your job search using the fastest growing job search engines on the web
    • Set up searches on BroncoLink that yield results!
    • Learn strategies for boosting the number of targeted jobs arriving in your inbox daily

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
Job Search Strategies Boot Camp for Seniors
JST Baccalaureate Liturgy
JST Community Mass and Soup Supper
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 5:15 PM

    Join us for our weekly community liturgy, followed by a convivial simple soup supper.  Often, there is a lecture or other event planned immediately following.  All are welcome!


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
JST-SCU Commencement Ceremony
Junipero Serra: From His Own Perspective
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, May 5
    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102 (Room Change)
     
    Junípero Serra, the first president of the California missions, is one of the most controversial figures in the history of early California and the American Southwest. Many of the writings about him have expressed one of two polar perspectives, portraying him as either a selfless man of God or an oppressive exploiter of California's native peoples. This class introduces Serra to a twenty-first century audience in a different way. We attempt to approach Serra as he approached himself, as an eighteenth-century Roman Catholic priest. We will emphasize two aspects of Serra's internal vision. First, we will elucidate the ways in which he understood his own vocation as a Franciscan missionary in the New World. Second, we will emphasize the relationships he developed with the native peoples of the New World we sought to evangelize in Mexico and in California. In this way, we hope that participants will come to both a deeper understanding of this individual man and also gain new insights into the ways in which controversial parts of our own history can be interpreted.
     
    Rose Marie Beebe is Professor of Spanish Literature at Santa Clara University. Robert Senkewicz is Professor of History at Santa Clara University. Together they have written and edited a series of books on early California history, including: The History of Alta California: a Memoir of Mexican California (1996); Lands of Promise and Despair's: Chronicles of Early California (2001); Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women (2006); and "To Toil in That Vineyard of the Lord:" ry ContemporaScholarship on Junípero Serra (2010). Their most recent work, Junípero Serra: California, Indians, and the Transformation of a Missionary was just published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
La Table française/The French Table
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
  • Monday, Apr 27, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
  • Monday, Jun 1, 2015 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    Welcome to the French Table! / Bienvenus à  la Table française!

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 PM on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows, otherwise inside.  (The table has little flags from Francophone countries in its center).
     
    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, autrement nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.
     
    A demain!

    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson patio (in inclement weather meet inside)
Leadership Crisis in Silicon Valley: A Way Forward
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

     Silicon Valley life presents significant challenges to individual and organizational leadership.  In this working lunch, Kirk Hanson, Executive Director of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University and Ann Skeet, Director of Leadership Ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University will reflect on the ten most significant challenges facing Silicon Valley leaders today and consider how resources within the Ignatian tradition might provide an innovative, transformative way forward.

    Sponsored by the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education and the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.


    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Life After SCU: Alumni Tell All
Life After SCU: BBQ Basics
  • Wednesday, May 13, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Take your backyard BBQ skills to a whole new level at Life After SCU: BBQ Basics. The event will feature a discussion around meat selection, BBQ sauce, fire management, and presentation.  Attendees will also enjoy samples of BBQ made on-site!

    Open to member of the Class of 2015.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $6
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Life After SCU: Career Connect
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Join the Alumni Association and fellow Broncos as you network with soon to be graduates. The 8th Annual Career Connect will feature a presentation on "Networking 101" by Alumni Career Counselor Jill Klees. Following the discussion, alums and current seniors will have the opportunity to practice their networking skills. This could be a great opportunity to recruit or fill an open position for your company! Light appetizers and beverages to be served.

    Free of charge for alumni.

    Class of 2015 RSVP
    Alumni RSVP


    Cost: No Charge Alumni, $6 Seniors
    Location:
         Location TBD
Life After SCU: Theology of Marriage
  • Wednesday, May 6, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Enjoy an engaging discussion with Professor Frederick Parrella during Life After SCU: Theology of Marriage.  Discussion will focus on the meanings of marriage, sex and sexuality, the principles of a thriving marriage, and the spirituality of marriage.

    Sign up early as this will sell out! 

    Open to all members of the Class of 2015.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: No Cost
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
         SCU Campus
Life After SCU: Wine Education
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Life After SCU: Wine Education will feature a blind wine tasting lead by an alumnus winemaker.  Each attendee will also receive a Class of 2015 commemorative wine glass. Spots fill up fast, so RSVP early!

    Open to members of the Class of 2015.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $10
    Location:
         St. Ignatius Lawn
LinkedIn Drop-In Lab
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

     Are you on LinkedIn? 94% of recruiters source talent on LinkedIn. Watch a demo (starting at 2) of how to build a professional profile, connect with SCU alumni, follow companies, and search for internships and jobs. Work on your LinkedIn account and ask questions as you work.


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Friday, May 8, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

     Are you on LinkedIn? 94% of recruiters source talent on LinkedIn. Watch a demo (starting at 2) of how to build a professional profile, connect with SCU alumni, follow companies, and search for internships and jobs. Work on your LinkedIn account and ask questions as you work.


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Friday, May 15, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

     Are you on LinkedIn? 94% of recruiters source talent on LinkedIn. Watch a demo (starting at 2) of how to build a professional profile, connect with SCU alumni, follow companies, and search for internships and jobs. Work on your LinkedIn account and ask questions as you work.


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
Literary Cuisine: Rude Dude's Book of Food
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

     A lunch event based on the book, Rude Dude's Book of Food: Stories behind some of the crazy-cool stuff we eat, written by Santa Clara University professor, Tim Myers. RSVP link coming soon.


    Cost: $12
    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Longevity and the Aging Brain
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Dr. Dena Dubal is a neurologist and neuroscientist passionate about biomedical discoveries to improve human health. Dr. Dubal received her MD and PhD degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her graduate research focused on effects of hormones on stroke injury. Dr. Dubal completed a medical internship and neurology residency at UCSF, where she also served as chief resident. She then completed a basic research and clinical fellowship in aging and dementias.

    Dr. Dubal leads a team unraveling how to slow or block aging of the body and brain. Using synergistic and cutting-edge approaches, her lab is investigating how an anti-aging approach holds promise in developing treatments to improve brain health in normal aging and disease. Her discoveries have been profiled in high-impact media such as NPR, the Economist, and the Wall Street Journal – and are recognized as potential therapies for living longer and better. Awards and honors for her work include the Elizabeth Young New Investigator Award, Paul Beeson Career Development Award through the NIA and American Federation for Aging Research, the Glenn Award for Basic Research in Mechanisms of Aging, and the UCSF David A. Coulter Endowed Chair in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 (voice) or 1-800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

    RSVP


    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
LOS ANGELES AFO - Campus Beautification at St. Bernard High School
  • Saturday, Jun 6, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM

     Join fellow Broncos at St. Bernard High School in Playa del Rey to help with some campus beautification projects.

    Following the project all volunteers are invited to the home of Kelly '78, Thalia '79 and Cailin '13 Doherty for lunch.

    RSVP


    Cost: N/A
Los Angeles Bronco Bench Foundation Golf Tournament
M.A./M.T.S. Student Thesis Presentations
M.A./M.T.S. Student Thesis Presentations
Magis
MBA / MS Info Sessions
MBA Round 2 Deadline
Memorial Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Men's Rowing 50th Anniversary Celebration
  • Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Join the fellow Broncos as we celebrate 50 years of men's rowing at Santa Clara! The event will be held on the evening of Saturday, May 2nd at the Leavey Center on the Mission campus. All alumni and supporters of the program are encouraged to come and celebrate the history, dedication, and success of SCU Rowing!

    RSVP Today


    Cost: $150 per person
    Location: Leavey Center
Misa en Espanol
  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM
    Come celebrate Catholic Mass with our Spanish-speaking community at our monthly Misa en español.
     
    Music will be led by the youth choir of Sacred Heart Parish, San Jose, led by Carlos Barba and some SCU students.
     
    Food and drink will be shared afterwards!
     
    All are welcome, even if you don't speak Spanish!
     
     
     
     

    Location: Mission Church
MS Finance Round 2 Deadline
Music & Struggle in Southern Africa
  • Wednesday, May 6, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, May 6, 13, 20
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

    This course will explores a diverse and dynamic range of musical practices from Southern Africa as they relate to political and historical formations such as European colonialism, Apartheid, and independence movements more broadly. Specifically, we will focus on the traditional and popular music cultures of Zimbabwe and South Africa as a way to engage issues of nationalism, regionalism, and resistance. How has Southern African music served as a vehicle of protest as well as solidarity? Musical examples and documentaries will be presented in addition to a special guest performer.
     
    Christina Zanfagna is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University.  Her research focuses on the intersections of popular music, race, religious conversion, and urban geography.  In particular, she specializes in African American music, especially hip hop, R&B, soul music, and gospel rap.  Her work has appeared in the Black Music Research Journal, the Pacific Review of Ethnomusicology, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies.  She is also a flamenco dancer.

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, May 13, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, May 6, 13, 20
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

    This course will explores a diverse and dynamic range of musical practices from Southern Africa as they relate to political and historical formations such as European colonialism, Apartheid, and independence movements more broadly. Specifically, we will focus on the traditional and popular music cultures of Zimbabwe and South Africa as a way to engage issues of nationalism, regionalism, and resistance. How has Southern African music served as a vehicle of protest as well as solidarity? Musical examples and documentaries will be presented in addition to a special guest performer.
     
    Christina Zanfagna is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University.  Her research focuses on the intersections of popular music, race, religious conversion, and urban geography.  In particular, she specializes in African American music, especially hip hop, R&B, soul music, and gospel rap.  Her work has appeared in the Black Music Research Journal, the Pacific Review of Ethnomusicology, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies.  She is also a flamenco dancer.

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Wednesday, May 6, 13, 20
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

    This course will explores a diverse and dynamic range of musical practices from Southern Africa as they relate to political and historical formations such as European colonialism, Apartheid, and independence movements more broadly. Specifically, we will focus on the traditional and popular music cultures of Zimbabwe and South Africa as a way to engage issues of nationalism, regionalism, and resistance. How has Southern African music served as a vehicle of protest as well as solidarity? Musical examples and documentaries will be presented in addition to a special guest performer.
     
    Christina Zanfagna is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Santa Clara University.  Her research focuses on the intersections of popular music, race, religious conversion, and urban geography.  In particular, she specializes in African American music, especially hip hop, R&B, soul music, and gospel rap.  Her work has appeared in the Black Music Research Journal, the Pacific Review of Ethnomusicology, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies.  She is also a flamenco dancer.

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Nashville National College Fair - Nashville, TN
NEW YORK AFO - Volunteer project
Orange County National College Fair - Anaheim, CA
Orchestra Concert
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Paper, Wood, and Copper: Early Printed Arts in Special Collections
PNACAC Portland College Fair - Portland, OR
PNACAC Seattle College Fair - Seattle, WA
Pre-Turkey Departure Talk
PROF x400: We Share Solar
  • Tuesday, Aug 4, 2015 at 8:30 AM to Wednesday, Aug 5, 2015 at 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM

    PROF x400: We Share Solar

    DATE: Tuesday, August 4th through Wednesday, August 5th

    TIME: 8:30AM-5:30PM 

    LOCATION: Santa Clara University, Room TBD

    WORKSHOP FEE: $300

    Register Here »

     

     


     

     WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    We Share Solar® is an experiential education program that teaches students energy literacy while reinforcing STEM skills through assembling the We Share Solar Suitcase, a 12volt DC stand-alone solar power system. Once completed, the student-built systems are inspected and sent to schools, orphanages and community centers in energy poor regions of the world. This educational experience encourages civic engagement through building awareness of energy poverty and sustainable development, as well as inspiring students through helping others.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Workshop participants learn how to incorporate the Solar Suitcase and solar electricity into their programs and schoolrooms. They will build a Solar Suitcase and leave with a robust curriculum guide filled with presentations, labs and activities, an operational Solar Suitcase (one per institutional team) and accessories valued at $1500. Teachers will receive a certificate confirming 20 hours of Professional Development.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    DR. HAL ARONSON, We Share Solar® Creator and Co-Director is the inventor of the Solar Suitcase, which won the 2011 Nokia Health Tech Award. He is also co-founder and Director of Technology and Education for We Care Solar, which won the 2012 Department of Energy C3E Award for Clean Energy, Education and Empowerment in the Developing World. Dr. Aronson has taught renewable energy education for over 20 years, including co-creating Solar Schoolhouse which brings solar curriculum to schools throughout California. He has led educational and workforce development programs in several cities including Solar Richmond (CA), E-Three Labs Workforce Development (Detroit, MI) and California Youth Energy Services (Berkeley, CA). Hal leads professional development workshops for teachers at Princeton University and through the Bay Area Science Project, Lawrence Hall of Science and the Space Science Labs at UC Berkeley. He recently began teaching solar energy to African health technicians. Dr. Aronson obtained his Ph.D. in environmental sociology from UCSC, focusing his dissertation on environmental justice. 

     

     

     


    Cost: $300
    Location: Loyola Hall
         TBD
PROF x401:LEED v4 Green Associate Exam Prep Training
  • Saturday, May 16, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

    PROF x401:LEED v4 Green Associate Exam Prep Training

    DATE: Saturday, May 16th

    TIME: 9:30AM -5:30PM 

    LOCATION: TBD

    WORKSHOP FEE: $320

    Register Here »

     

     


    COST

    The cost for the course is $320, however if 40 or more enroll the price will be $270, so please tell your friends.

     WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The Center is working with Sustainable Investment Group (SIG) to provide a one-day green building workshop that prepares you for the 100-question professional LEED exam. Upon passing, this credential demonstrates your knowledge of green building and a commitment to sustainability.

    This course provides:

    A Live Expert Instructor
    LEED v4 GA Study Guide
    600 Online Practice Exams
    Access to LEED Experts via Online Forum
    MP3’s of Green Associate Main Topics
    Live Proctoring of Sample Exam Questions and Scenarios

    TARGET AUDIENCE
    Students, Property Managers, Building Engineers, Contractors, Vendors, Asset Managers, Contractors, Developers, Architects, Designers, Building Owners, Engineers, Energy Industry Professionals, Manufacturers, Suppliers, Legal Counsel, and Planners are encouraged to attend.

    INSTRUCTORS

    The instructors are supplied by Sustainable Investment Group (SIG). All of SIG’s instructors are LEED AP with specialty and have worked on LEED Projects from inception to completion. They understand what it takes to prepare for and pass the LEED exams. SIG instructors have trained over 12,000 students across the U.S. to pass the LEED professional credential exams.

     


    Cost: $320
    Location: Loyola Hall
         TBD
Professional Profile Lab for Liberal Arts Students
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM
    • Understand why employers value Liberal Arts degrees & education
    • Develop your personal brand
    • Learn how to articulate your skills an dexperiences for your resume & LinkedIn profile
    • Bring your laptop to get started during lab time and ask questions as you work

    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
Recent Grads BBQ
Resume Drop-In Lab
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

     Learn how to build your brand with your resume and grab recruiters’ attention. Work on a draft of your resume and ask questions as you work.  


    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Commons
  • Wednesday, May 13, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

     Learn how to build your brand with your resume and grab recruiters’ attention. Work on a draft of your resume and ask questions as you work.  


    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Commons
Reunion Class Block Party
Reunion Mass
Rush Hour Concert - SCLOrk
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 5:30 PM

     Enjoy 50 minutes of music from our Laptop Orchestra (SCLOrk) and and then breeze through your commute!


    Cost: free
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
San Diego National College Fair - San Diego, CA
San Francisco 25th Annual Day at the Giants
  • Saturday, May 30, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM

     

    25th Annual 
    Santa Clara Day at the Giants
    Saturday, May 30, 2015
    World Champion Giants vs Atlanta Braves
     
    Tailgate BBQ 5 p.m., Crossed Borders Buffet catered by Compadres Rio Grille (Rick Enos '68, proprietor)
    Giants reserved tailgate area next to Parking Lot A across from Pier 48
     
    First pitch 7:05 p.m., Giants vs Braves, AT&T Park on McCovey Cove
    Giants Postseason Heroes Bobblehead Night
    1st 40,000 fans receive a Belt, Crawford or Petit bobblehead
     
    $75 per person includes Compadres Tailgate BBQ, beverages,view reserved seats behind home plate (sec.312-314)
     
    All tickets will be available for pick-up at the pregame tailgate.
     

    Cost: $75 Per Person
    Location:
         AT&T Park on McCovey Cove
SAN FRANCISCO AFO- Sorting Donations at St. Anthony's
San Francisco National College Fair - Daly City, CA
San Jose Museum of Art Networking Event
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    It's our last time to get artsy together!

    Come join the Inter-Network Council, fellow classmates and alumni over some art appreciation, hors-d'oeuvres and wine at the San Jose Museum of Art. 

    Formal attire suggested.

    $30/student

    $35/alumni & guests

    Please register here!


    Cost: Please see above
    Location:
         San Jose Museum of Art
Sandra Gilbert: Bitter Herbs? Engendering the Italian American Culinary Imagination
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM

    Bitter Herbs? Engendering the Italian American Culinary Imagination

    Lecture by Sandra Gilbert, author of The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Conference Room 21
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Mother's Day party for Home Safe shelter
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 8:00 PM

     Join fellow Broncos to provide a fun Mother's Day party for the women and children of Home Safe shelters.  Volunteers are needed to supervise crafts and serve dinner.

    RSVP


    Cost: N/A
    Location: Locatelli Center
Science Fiction Then and Now
  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, May 14, 21
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Room  B&C (Room Change)

    Written science fiction has changed much since the days of the pulp magazines, when silver rocket ships and bubble-helmeted astronauts stood boldly on alien landscapes.  From its early focus on manifest  
    destiny in space, the field has grown to embrace feminism, libertarianism, and myriad other “isms.”  It can be a funhouse mirror held up to the present or a warning of dangers yet to come.  It explores imaginary cultures and wrestles with alien philosophies.  In this course, we'll read Asimov, Clarke, and newer writers.  We'll explore strange new sub-genres from cyberpunk to the Mundane movement to new space opera.

    Cliff Winnig works as an engineer and as a science fiction (and fantasy) writer.  His stories have appeared in a number of anthologies and elsewhere.  He has taught subjects as diverse as software, music, and karate; and he has appeared on numerous panels discussing various aspects of science fiction.  He holds a master’s degree in music and has been known to play the sitar.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, May 21, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, May 14, 21
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Room  B&C (Room Change)

    Written science fiction has changed much since the days of the pulp magazines, when silver rocket ships and bubble-helmeted astronauts stood boldly on alien landscapes.  From its early focus on manifest  
    destiny in space, the field has grown to embrace feminism, libertarianism, and myriad other “isms.”  It can be a funhouse mirror held up to the present or a warning of dangers yet to come.  It explores imaginary cultures and wrestles with alien philosophies.  In this course, we'll read Asimov, Clarke, and newer writers.  We'll explore strange new sub-genres from cyberpunk to the Mundane movement to new space opera.

    Cliff Winnig works as an engineer and as a science fiction (and fantasy) writer.  His stories have appeared in a number of anthologies and elsewhere.  He has taught subjects as diverse as software, music, and karate; and he has appeared on numerous panels discussing various aspects of science fiction.  He holds a master’s degree in music and has been known to play the sitar.

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Room B & C
SCU Community Day of Service
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 1:30 PM

    Join the entire SCU Community including Faculty, Staff, Students and Alumni to volunteer at several projects supporting our Thriving Neighbors Initative in the Greater Washington area of San Jose.  
    Projects include:
    Reading, Art or Sports with the Washington school students
    Campus clean up at Nativity School
    Sorting donations at Sacred Heart Community Services
    Gardening at Washington or Gardner center

    A delicious homemade tamale lunch made by the Washington school mothers will be served on the Washington school campus after the service projects.  All volunteers are invited!

    RSVP


    Cost: N/A
    Location:
         United States
SCU FOOTBALL Reunion
  • Sunday, May 17, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Bronco Football alumni, coaches, family, and friends are invited back to campus to celebrate the friendships created while part of the Santa Clara football program.  We will all raise a toast to celebrate Coach Pat Malley '53 and Dave Cichoke '87. 

    RSVP


    Cost: $25
SEATTLE AFO - Campus Clean Up at Washington School
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Join fellow Bronces and other Jesuit alumni in Seattle for a campus beautification project  cleaning tables, chairs and windows as well as constructing an edible garden at Washington Middle School. 

    All are welcome - bring a friend.

    RSVP


    Cost: N/A
Seattle Brand4U: Webinar, Personal Branding Lecture & Workshop
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     fpo

    Can you clearly define your personal brand in 30 seconds?

    Your personal brand defines YOU and you must manage it as it becomes your reputation.

    Whether you're job searching or not, knowing how to represent yourself is a valuable skill.

    Join us for a two-part series (one pre-event webinar and branding homework exercise, and one in-person lecture/workshop) with SCU Professor of Practice H. Buford Barr titled "Brand4U" where you will develop your personal brand value statement then hone it through interactive groups. "Tell me about yourself" is more challenging that you think.  Don't miss this great opportunity, which will be held on Seattle University's Campus, in the Admissions and Alumni Relations Building.

    RSVP HERE


    Cost: $15 Per Person
    Location:
         Seattle University's Campus, Admissions and Alumni Relations Building
Shakespeare 2015: Love, Lust, Tragedy, Romance
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, March 30 and April 6, 13, 20, 27
    Location: Wiegand Room 102 

     
    Shakespeare’s sonnets are frequently neglected in the veneration paid to his dramatic achievement. Yet the sonnets provide important insights into the plays themselves, especially those plays we shall be discussing during Spring 2015. Our first session will provide a general introduction to Shakespeare’s sonnets, followed by a close examination of specific sonnets that explicate his views on love and lust (yes, he differentiates!).
    Subsequent classes will feature the three Shakespearean dramas being performed at the 2015 Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) <http://www.osfashland.org/>: Much Ado About Nothing, Antony and Cleopatra, and Pericles. Even if you have no plans to attend the Festival, these plays provide an excellent introduction to Shakespeare’s genius: a comedy, a tragedy, and a romance.
    You can choose your level of study. Some students just come and listen. Others watch the plays at home on DVD before or after class discussions (joining with other classmates for a rousing Shakespeare party!). Some read the plays in depth and ask the professor obscure, difficult, and fascinating questions. Copies of the sonnets and plays are available at all public libraries and bookstores. FREE texts are available on-line.

     

    Arlene Okerlund, a retired Professor of English from San José State University, specializes in Shakespeare and in medieval/Renaissance studies. She twice taught in SJSU’s Semester-Abroad-in-England, where she loved studying Shakespeare and English history on site. During retirement she has published biographies of England’s first Yorkist queen, Elizabeth: England’s Slandered Queen, and the first Tudor queen Elizabeth of York (mother of Henry VIII)--both available in paperback. During retirement, Professor Okerlund began taking banjo lessons and plays tenor banjo with the Peninsula Banjo Band (Wednesday nights at Harry’s Hofbrau, San José).

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall
  • Monday, Apr 27, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, March 30 and April 6, 13, 20, 27
    Location: Wiegand Room 102 

     
    Shakespeare’s sonnets are frequently neglected in the veneration paid to his dramatic achievement. Yet the sonnets provide important insights into the plays themselves, especially those plays we shall be discussing during Spring 2015. Our first session will provide a general introduction to Shakespeare’s sonnets, followed by a close examination of specific sonnets that explicate his views on love and lust (yes, he differentiates!).
    Subsequent classes will feature the three Shakespearean dramas being performed at the 2015 Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) <http://www.osfashland.org/>: Much Ado About Nothing, Antony and Cleopatra, and Pericles. Even if you have no plans to attend the Festival, these plays provide an excellent introduction to Shakespeare’s genius: a comedy, a tragedy, and a romance.
    You can choose your level of study. Some students just come and listen. Others watch the plays at home on DVD before or after class discussions (joining with other classmates for a rousing Shakespeare party!). Some read the plays in depth and ask the professor obscure, difficult, and fascinating questions. Copies of the sonnets and plays are available at all public libraries and bookstores. FREE texts are available on-line.

     

    Arlene Okerlund, a retired Professor of English from San José State University, specializes in Shakespeare and in medieval/Renaissance studies. She twice taught in SJSU’s Semester-Abroad-in-England, where she loved studying Shakespeare and English history on site. During retirement she has published biographies of England’s first Yorkist queen, Elizabeth: England’s Slandered Queen, and the first Tudor queen Elizabeth of York (mother of Henry VIII)--both available in paperback. During retirement, Professor Okerlund began taking banjo lessons and plays tenor banjo with the Peninsula Banjo Band (Wednesday nights at Harry’s Hofbrau, San José).

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall
Shi Chen : University of Washington
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:15 PM
    There is a CRS lunch seminar on Friday, April 24, 201?5 at Lucas 125 from 12:00pm-1:15pm. 
     
    TITLE: Incentive Alignment and Coordination of Project Supply Chains 
     
    PRESENTER: 
    Shi Chen 
    Assistant Professor of Operations
    University of Washington at Seattle, Foster
     
    ABSTRACT: 
    We consider a project supply chain, in which a general contractor carries out a sequence of tasks and each task requires the use of certain key materials from a specific supplier. We focus on structuring the optimal time-based incentive contract under which channel coordination can be achieved for such supply chains. In addition to a penalty/bonus term, the optimal contract requires optimizing the material delivery schedule, as well as the amount and timing of the payment to each supplier. Under this contract, what matters to the manufacturer's profit is the variance rather than the mean of the supplier's delivery lead time distribution. Moreover, the supplier can always benefit from a reduction in the mean and/or variance of the delivery lead time, while his profit is independent of either the duration of the on-site tasks or the delivery lead times of other suppliers. Furthermore, we also show that channel coordination can still be achieved even if the manufacturer's estimate of the average delivery lead time is biased, and the supplier will not be incentivized to conceal his true estimate, which implies that the prevalent issue of lack of information transparency in project supply chains can be mitigated by using the proposed contract.
     
    Joint work with Hau Lee (Stanford GSB)
     
     
    Bio:

    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 125
SIG Aging Gracefully
SIG Appassionati Italiani
  • Friday, May 15, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
  • Friday, Jun 19, 2015 from 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Appassionati Italiani (Italian Aficionados) SIG

    Appassionati Italiani is a group of fans of all things Italian. We discuss travels, food, culture, and tell stories and speak in Italian if possible. All levels of fluency are represented. We are learning from each other, so bring your ideas and love of Italy and see what you can learn at our next meeting. We currently meet in the Santa Clara Library Board Room  on the 3rdFriday of the month from 3:30 to 5:30 pmThere will be no meeting in December.
     
    For more information, contact Barbara Gasdick at bgmoxie@hotmail.com

    Location: Learning Commons and Library
SIG Be the Change Lecture
SIG Be the Change Lecture
SIG Cultural Cornucopia
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
    Friends,
     
    Our next conversation is May 12, from Noon-1:30pm, in Casa Italiana Commons .The narrative will be animated by the novel Driving the King, by Ravi Howard. The "King" refers to Nat King Cole, and to get us in the mood, here is a YouTube video of him singing Unforgettable.
     
     
    Cheers.
     
    Fred
     
    Editorial Reviews
    Review
    “Ravi Howard tells a thoroughly convincing story about the singing star Nat King Cole’s best friend…. [A] warmly enveloping book…. Appealing.” (Janet Maslin, New York Times)

    “A moving tale about bigotry and the power of friendship.” (People)

    “Excellent…moving….Weary is a marvelous character…. Readers who appreciate beautifully written, compelling novels with great depth and humanity will be more than pleased.” (Philadelphia Inquirer)

    “ Heartbreaking…. A bold reimagining of [the] civil rights era…. Howard’s choices…are daring.” (Los Angeles Times)

    “By following Howard’s characters, we are allowed a sidelong but penetrating glimpse into one of the most important events in American history…. Howard bends history…proving that the past can be best felt through refracted light rather than under the harsh glare of historical fact.” (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

    “In an easygoing style, with Weary as his guide, Howard pokes into under-viewed corners of the fight while never losing sight of the humanity of both the cause and its effects.” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

    “Howard brings readers back in time to postwar Alabama, in this velvety smooth fictional memoir. . . . [His] prose goes down like the top-shelf whiskey that Weary favors, making for a heady reading experience.” (Publishers Weekly (starred review))

    “Through unfussy language and well-formed characters...gifted novelist Howard...takes readers of all races, ages and classes into the world of pre-civil rights era black people, offering insight on and understanding of one of our country’s most tumultuous periods.” (BookPage)

    “Alternating between the cities and Weary’s past and present, Howard explores race relations in the pre-civil rights era and the strong ties forged between two extraordinary men.” (Booklist)

    “Powerful…. A personal, poignant portrayal of how the lives of African Americans could be so easily derailed by racial inequality.” (Library Journal (starred review)

    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         commons
SIG Current Events
  • Thursday, May 7, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
    Current Events Discussion SIG 
    Monthly Discussion:

    APRIL:  Group One will meet on Monday April 6, 2015 (1-3 p.m.); Group Two will meet on Tuesday April 7, 2015 (1-3 p.m.)

    MAY:  Thursday May 7, 2015 (Group One: 10 a.m.-12 noon and Group Two: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.)

    JUNE:  Wednesday June 3, 2015
     (Group One: 10 a.m.-12 noon and Group Two: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.)

    For more information contact Len Schreibstein (e-mail: Lnshrbstn@aol.com)

    Location: Loyola Hall
  • Wednesday, Jun 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
    Current Events Discussion SIG 
    Monthly Discussion:

    APRIL:  Group One will meet on Monday April 6, 2015 (1-3 p.m.); Group Two will meet on Tuesday April 7, 2015 (1-3 p.m.)

    MAY:  Thursday May 7, 2015 (Group One: 10 a.m.-12 noon and Group Two: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.)

    JUNE:  Wednesday June 3, 2015
     (Group One: 10 a.m.-12 noon and Group Two: 1 p.m.-3 p.m.)

    For more information contact Len Schreibstein (e-mail: Lnshrbstn@aol.com)

    Location: Loyola Hall
SIG Mystery Book Club
  • Thursday, Apr 23, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
    Hello Mystery Book Club Fans,
     
    Here's our next read: The Girl Next Door by Ruth Rendell.  We'll meet in Parlor A, Benson Center on Thursday, April 23rd from 11 am to Noon.  John Daly will facilitate.

    Contact  Susan Haag at shaag408@yahoo.com  for more information. 


    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlor A
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
    Hello Mystery Book Club Fans,
     
    Here's our next read: The Girl Next Door by Ruth Rendell.  We'll meet in Parlor A, Benson Center on Thursday, April 23rd from 11 am to Noon.  John Daly will facilitate.

    Contact  Susan Haag at shaag408@yahoo.com  for more information. 


    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlor A
SIG Olliwood
  • Monday, Apr 20, 2015 at 1:45 PM
    Hello:  The movie selection for April 20th  is Danny Collins assuming it is still playing then.  At the moment it is at Cinearts Santana Row at 1:45.  
    I will be in Italy but Phil will be there to guide any new participants.  
    Please check next Friday to see if the time has changed.  
    Hope you enjoy the movie.
    Evelyn
     
    To join the group email evelynhow@yahoo.com Olliwood - Let's Go to the Movies!
     

    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Sleep and Dreams: What Is Really Happening While We're Sleeping
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, April 28 and May 5, 12
    Location: Daly Science 207 (Room Change)

    The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep  and will cover how sleep affects our daily lives -- both physical and mental functions of our well being.  The course will cover the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Knowledge learned should empower the student to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of his or her life. An equally important goal is to shape students’ attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep will provide tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. 

    Dr. William C Dement is Chief Emeritus of the Division of Sleep at Stanford University School of Medicine, which is also the home of the world’s first sleep disorders center he founded.  In 1975, Dr. Dement established the American Academy of Sleep Medicine serving as its first President for twelve years.  Dr. Dement was also a founder of the American Board of Sleep Medicine.  From 1990-1993, he served as Chairman of the U.S. Congress’ National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research.  In 2001, he received the largest National Institute of Health research grant in sleep medicine history.   As the author or co-author of over 500 scientific publications he is now completing his 43rd year of teaching one of the largest and most popular classes on the Stanford campus, “Sleep and Dreams.”

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Daly Science 200
         Room 207
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, April 28 and May 5, 12
    Location: Daly Science 207 (Room Change)

    The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep  and will cover how sleep affects our daily lives -- both physical and mental functions of our well being.  The course will cover the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Knowledge learned should empower the student to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of his or her life. An equally important goal is to shape students’ attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep will provide tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. 

    Dr. William C Dement is Chief Emeritus of the Division of Sleep at Stanford University School of Medicine, which is also the home of the world’s first sleep disorders center he founded.  In 1975, Dr. Dement established the American Academy of Sleep Medicine serving as its first President for twelve years.  Dr. Dement was also a founder of the American Board of Sleep Medicine.  From 1990-1993, he served as Chairman of the U.S. Congress’ National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research.  In 2001, he received the largest National Institute of Health research grant in sleep medicine history.   As the author or co-author of over 500 scientific publications he is now completing his 43rd year of teaching one of the largest and most popular classes on the Stanford campus, “Sleep and Dreams.”

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Daly Science 200
         Room 207
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Tuesday, April 28 and May 5, 12
    Location: Daly Science 207 (Room Change)

    The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep  and will cover how sleep affects our daily lives -- both physical and mental functions of our well being.  The course will cover the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Knowledge learned should empower the student to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of his or her life. An equally important goal is to shape students’ attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep will provide tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. 

    Dr. William C Dement is Chief Emeritus of the Division of Sleep at Stanford University School of Medicine, which is also the home of the world’s first sleep disorders center he founded.  In 1975, Dr. Dement established the American Academy of Sleep Medicine serving as its first President for twelve years.  Dr. Dement was also a founder of the American Board of Sleep Medicine.  From 1990-1993, he served as Chairman of the U.S. Congress’ National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research.  In 2001, he received the largest National Institute of Health research grant in sleep medicine history.   As the author or co-author of over 500 scientific publications he is now completing his 43rd year of teaching one of the largest and most popular classes on the Stanford campus, “Sleep and Dreams.”

    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Daly Science 200
         Room 207
Spring Semester 2015 Ends
Stalin and Stalinism
  • Monday, May 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Split Location Location: 
    Sobrato Residence Hall, Room B & C (May 4, 11, 18 and June 1)
    Bannan Hall 127 (June 8) 

    In 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia promising to construct a grand new world that would erase the injustices of both Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.  However, within a decade, Joseph Stalin was firmly at the helm of this ever more violent experiment.  In this class, we'll study Stalin's rise, his methods, and the system that bears his name.  Was Stalin's terror a byproduct of Marxist ideology?  Is the Soviet victory in World War II proof of the achievements of Stalinism, despite its costs?    How did Stalinism shape the lives of millions--whether in Moscow, far off republics, or the Gulag?  These are some of questions we'll explore, paying particular attention to historical debates and recent revelations about Stalin and Stalinism.
    Allison Katsev is a lecturer in the History Department at San Jose State University.  She teaches imperial Russian and Soviet history, as well as a variety of courses on Western Civilization, modern Europe and the World.   She received her doctoral degree in history from Stanford, and taught there in the Introduction to the Humanities program for several years before coming to SJSU.  This will be her first class for SCU Osher.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Split Location Location: 
    Sobrato Residence Hall, Room B & C (May 4, 11, 18 and June 1)
    Bannan Hall 127 (June 8) 

    In 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia promising to construct a grand new world that would erase the injustices of both Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.  However, within a decade, Joseph Stalin was firmly at the helm of this ever more violent experiment.  In this class, we'll study Stalin's rise, his methods, and the system that bears his name.  Was Stalin's terror a byproduct of Marxist ideology?  Is the Soviet victory in World War II proof of the achievements of Stalinism, despite its costs?    How did Stalinism shape the lives of millions--whether in Moscow, far off republics, or the Gulag?  These are some of questions we'll explore, paying particular attention to historical debates and recent revelations about Stalin and Stalinism.
    Allison Katsev is a lecturer in the History Department at San Jose State University.  She teaches imperial Russian and Soviet history, as well as a variety of courses on Western Civilization, modern Europe and the World.   She received her doctoral degree in history from Stanford, and taught there in the Introduction to the Humanities program for several years before coming to SJSU.  This will be her first class for SCU Osher.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Split Location Location: 
    Sobrato Residence Hall, Room B & C (May 4, 11, 18 and June 1)
    Bannan Hall 127 (June 8) 

    In 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia promising to construct a grand new world that would erase the injustices of both Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.  However, within a decade, Joseph Stalin was firmly at the helm of this ever more violent experiment.  In this class, we'll study Stalin's rise, his methods, and the system that bears his name.  Was Stalin's terror a byproduct of Marxist ideology?  Is the Soviet victory in World War II proof of the achievements of Stalinism, despite its costs?    How did Stalinism shape the lives of millions--whether in Moscow, far off republics, or the Gulag?  These are some of questions we'll explore, paying particular attention to historical debates and recent revelations about Stalin and Stalinism.
    Allison Katsev is a lecturer in the History Department at San Jose State University.  She teaches imperial Russian and Soviet history, as well as a variety of courses on Western Civilization, modern Europe and the World.   She received her doctoral degree in history from Stanford, and taught there in the Introduction to the Humanities program for several years before coming to SJSU.  This will be her first class for SCU Osher.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Monday, Jun 1, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Split Location Location: 
    Sobrato Residence Hall, Room B & C (May 4, 11, 18 and June 1)
    Bannan Hall 127 (June 8) 

    In 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia promising to construct a grand new world that would erase the injustices of both Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.  However, within a decade, Joseph Stalin was firmly at the helm of this ever more violent experiment.  In this class, we'll study Stalin's rise, his methods, and the system that bears his name.  Was Stalin's terror a byproduct of Marxist ideology?  Is the Soviet victory in World War II proof of the achievements of Stalinism, despite its costs?    How did Stalinism shape the lives of millions--whether in Moscow, far off republics, or the Gulag?  These are some of questions we'll explore, paying particular attention to historical debates and recent revelations about Stalin and Stalinism.
    Allison Katsev is a lecturer in the History Department at San Jose State University.  She teaches imperial Russian and Soviet history, as well as a variety of courses on Western Civilization, modern Europe and the World.   She received her doctoral degree in history from Stanford, and taught there in the Introduction to the Humanities program for several years before coming to SJSU.  This will be her first class for SCU Osher.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Monday, Jun 8, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Monday, May 4, 11, 18 and June 1, 8
    Split Location Location: 
    Sobrato Residence Hall, Room B & C (May 4, 11, 18 and June 1)
    Bannan Hall 127 (June 8) 

    In 1917, the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia promising to construct a grand new world that would erase the injustices of both Tsarist Russia and the capitalist West.  However, within a decade, Joseph Stalin was firmly at the helm of this ever more violent experiment.  In this class, we'll study Stalin's rise, his methods, and the system that bears his name.  Was Stalin's terror a byproduct of Marxist ideology?  Is the Soviet victory in World War II proof of the achievements of Stalinism, despite its costs?    How did Stalinism shape the lives of millions--whether in Moscow, far off republics, or the Gulag?  These are some of questions we'll explore, paying particular attention to historical debates and recent revelations about Stalin and Stalinism.
    Allison Katsev is a lecturer in the History Department at San Jose State University.  She teaches imperial Russian and Soviet history, as well as a variety of courses on Western Civilization, modern Europe and the World.   She received her doctoral degree in history from Stanford, and taught there in the Introduction to the Humanities program for several years before coming to SJSU.  This will be her first class for SCU Osher.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
Study Abroad 101
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Abroad Pre-Departure Orientation (Fall/Summer)
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Rosary
Study Break Prayer: Taize
Summer 2015 Destination Learning Trip
Sunday Morning Liturgy
Sustaining your Legacy
  • Saturday, May 2, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    This year’s 13th annual conference, Sustaining your Legacy,  will focus on bringing together a diverse group of individuals to share their narratives on what they have done to establish, shape, and sustain their legacies. We hope to create an experience that will not only educate but inspire approximately 200 attendees to think about ways in which they also can make an impact.

    Register here!

    Pricing  

    Early bird pricing (SCU current student/alumni) - until April 17th - $45.00

    Early bird pricing (general public) - until April 17th - $55.00

    Admission (SCU current student/alumni) - after April 17th - $55.00

    Admission (general public) - after April 17th - $65.00


    Location:
         The Tech Museum of Innovation
Tavola Italiana
  • Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, May 6, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, May 13, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, May 27, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
  • Wednesday, Jun 3, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    Tavola italiana is back for the 2015 Spring quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are especially encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

      

    The Tavola italiana will meet every Wednesday from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm in Casa Italiana,  starting on April 8th. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside, in Casa Commons.  

     
    I am looking forward to seeing you there on Wednesday!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Main entrance (Casa Commons in inclement weather)
Teresa McCollough - Piano
The American Presidency: From FDR to Barack Obama
  • Thursday, Apr 23, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
    Split Rooms Location: 
    Bannan Hall Room 142 (April 2, 9, 16, and 23)
    Sobrato Hall, Room B & C (April 30)

     
     
    This course examines the complexities of the modern American Presidency.  It will focus on the power as well as the impotency of the office of the President. Focusing on the ambiguities of the multiple roles of the President and the limits and possibilities of Presidential leadership, we shall examine the prospects for effective use of Presidential power.  Our focus will be on the Presidency from FDR to Obama.. We shall look at the various styles of Presidential leadership and the tensions between charismatic and pragmatic approaches to Presidential power. Finally we shall analyze the significance and fragility of power exercised by the only office in American politics which enjoys a national constituency.
     
    Gerard Heather is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD from Syracuse University; his areas of expertise include American politics, the role of religion in politics, and ethics in politics.  Professor Heather is a frequent commentator on politics; and lectures at events throughout the Bay Area, including Osher programs  

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
  • Thursday, Apr 30, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Thursday, April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
    Split Rooms Location: 
    Bannan Hall Room 142 (April 2, 9, 16, and 23)
    Sobrato Hall, Room B & C (April 30)

     
     
    This course examines the complexities of the modern American Presidency.  It will focus on the power as well as the impotency of the office of the President. Focusing on the ambiguities of the multiple roles of the President and the limits and possibilities of Presidential leadership, we shall examine the prospects for effective use of Presidential power.  Our focus will be on the Presidency from FDR to Obama.. We shall look at the various styles of Presidential leadership and the tensions between charismatic and pragmatic approaches to Presidential power. Finally we shall analyze the significance and fragility of power exercised by the only office in American politics which enjoys a national constituency.
     
    Gerard Heather is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD from Syracuse University; his areas of expertise include American politics, the role of religion in politics, and ethics in politics.  Professor Heather is a frequent commentator on politics; and lectures at events throughout the Bay Area, including Osher programs  

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
The Godfather Trilogy: Culture, Crime, and Cine-Analysis
  • Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19
    Location:  Library Viewing and Taping Room A  (Room Change)
     
    Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather Trilogy is recognized as one of the greatest American film series of all time.  It is a work about “the American Dream” as profound as any art in our nation’s history.  This course will invite you to re-watch the entire trilogy in class (1/2 of each film per class) and then spend time in discussion of its style, themes, and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the work’s place in film history; its film structure and artistry; the back story to its making; and its particular reflections on the immigrant experience, Italian culture, and crime history.
            
    It is recommended (though not required) that Mario Puzo’s original Godfather novel be read before the class. If you have never seen the trilogy, have seen all three movies once, watched only one of the three or loved the entire trilogy many times, this class is for you.
     
    Tom Alessandri has been a member of the Bellarmine College Prep faculty since 1975.  He is the director of their Theatre Arts Department, and a member of the English Department, where he has taught English Honors, Science Fiction, and the William Faulkner Seminar.   One can easily find former students who will tell you that he is the best teacher at Bellarmine. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, earned a Masters Degree from the University of Washington, and was the recipient of both local and national outstanding teaching awards.

    Cost: 95.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19
    Location:  Library Viewing and Taping Room A  (Room Change)
     
    Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather Trilogy is recognized as one of the greatest American film series of all time.  It is a work about “the American Dream” as profound as any art in our nation’s history.  This course will invite you to re-watch the entire trilogy in class (1/2 of each film per class) and then spend time in discussion of its style, themes, and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the work’s place in film history; its film structure and artistry; the back story to its making; and its particular reflections on the immigrant experience, Italian culture, and crime history.
            
    It is recommended (though not required) that Mario Puzo’s original Godfather novel be read before the class. If you have never seen the trilogy, have seen all three movies once, watched only one of the three or loved the entire trilogy many times, this class is for you.
     
    Tom Alessandri has been a member of the Bellarmine College Prep faculty since 1975.  He is the director of their Theatre Arts Department, and a member of the English Department, where he has taught English Honors, Science Fiction, and the William Faulkner Seminar.   One can easily find former students who will tell you that he is the best teacher at Bellarmine. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, earned a Masters Degree from the University of Washington, and was the recipient of both local and national outstanding teaching awards.

    Cost: 95.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19
    Location:  Library Viewing and Taping Room A  (Room Change)
     
    Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather Trilogy is recognized as one of the greatest American film series of all time.  It is a work about “the American Dream” as profound as any art in our nation’s history.  This course will invite you to re-watch the entire trilogy in class (1/2 of each film per class) and then spend time in discussion of its style, themes, and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the work’s place in film history; its film structure and artistry; the back story to its making; and its particular reflections on the immigrant experience, Italian culture, and crime history.
            
    It is recommended (though not required) that Mario Puzo’s original Godfather novel be read before the class. If you have never seen the trilogy, have seen all three movies once, watched only one of the three or loved the entire trilogy many times, this class is for you.
     
    Tom Alessandri has been a member of the Bellarmine College Prep faculty since 1975.  He is the director of their Theatre Arts Department, and a member of the English Department, where he has taught English Honors, Science Fiction, and the William Faulkner Seminar.   One can easily find former students who will tell you that he is the best teacher at Bellarmine. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, earned a Masters Degree from the University of Washington, and was the recipient of both local and national outstanding teaching awards.

    Cost: 95.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Tuesday, May 12, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19
    Location:  Library Viewing and Taping Room A  (Room Change)
     
    Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather Trilogy is recognized as one of the greatest American film series of all time.  It is a work about “the American Dream” as profound as any art in our nation’s history.  This course will invite you to re-watch the entire trilogy in class (1/2 of each film per class) and then spend time in discussion of its style, themes, and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the work’s place in film history; its film structure and artistry; the back story to its making; and its particular reflections on the immigrant experience, Italian culture, and crime history.
            
    It is recommended (though not required) that Mario Puzo’s original Godfather novel be read before the class. If you have never seen the trilogy, have seen all three movies once, watched only one of the three or loved the entire trilogy many times, this class is for you.
     
    Tom Alessandri has been a member of the Bellarmine College Prep faculty since 1975.  He is the director of their Theatre Arts Department, and a member of the English Department, where he has taught English Honors, Science Fiction, and the William Faulkner Seminar.   One can easily find former students who will tell you that he is the best teacher at Bellarmine. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, earned a Masters Degree from the University of Washington, and was the recipient of both local and national outstanding teaching awards.

    Cost: 95.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Tuesday, April 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19
    Location:  Library Viewing and Taping Room A  (Room Change)
     
    Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather Trilogy is recognized as one of the greatest American film series of all time.  It is a work about “the American Dream” as profound as any art in our nation’s history.  This course will invite you to re-watch the entire trilogy in class (1/2 of each film per class) and then spend time in discussion of its style, themes, and methods. Emphasis will be placed on the work’s place in film history; its film structure and artistry; the back story to its making; and its particular reflections on the immigrant experience, Italian culture, and crime history.
            
    It is recommended (though not required) that Mario Puzo’s original Godfather novel be read before the class. If you have never seen the trilogy, have seen all three movies once, watched only one of the three or loved the entire trilogy many times, this class is for you.
     
    Tom Alessandri has been a member of the Bellarmine College Prep faculty since 1975.  He is the director of their Theatre Arts Department, and a member of the English Department, where he has taught English Honors, Science Fiction, and the William Faulkner Seminar.   One can easily find former students who will tell you that he is the best teacher at Bellarmine. He is a graduate of the University of San Francisco, earned a Masters Degree from the University of Washington, and was the recipient of both local and national outstanding teaching awards.

    Cost: 95.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing and Taping, Room A
The Physics Startup
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Wednesday, April 29, 4-5 pm Alumni Science 120

    The Physics Startup
    or
    (How to get millions of dollars to play around in the lab!)

    Dr. Steven Deiker

    Kairos Aerospace

    Screen Shot 2015-04-12 at 12

     

    Silicon Valley is immersed in startup culture. The news and gossip around these companies forms a constant background in the media. Most of the startups we hear about revolve around software, but the same business culture is routinely applied to form science-based companies.

    The knowledge, skills and problem-solving techniques physicists use on a daily basis are directly applicable to startups of all sorts. By combining these two cultures, rapid progress can be made on important and fascinating problems. We will discuss this cultural overlap and the opportunities it produces.

     

    In compliance with the ADA/504 please direct your accommodation requests to John Birmingham at 408-551-7185 and jbirmingham@scu.edu at least 72 hours prior to the event.

     

     


    Location: Alumni Science Hall
         Alumni Science 120
The President's Dinner
  • Saturday, Apr 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    Join University President, Michael E. Engh, S.J. for a celebration honoring the President's Club Members and the 2015 Alumni Award Recipients:

    Ignatian Award 
    Frank Boitano '69, MBA '74
    Tim Jeffries '85

    Louis I. Bannan, S.J. Award

    Dr. Bart Lally '59

    Paul L. Locatelli, S.J. Award
    Karrie Grasser '70

    5 p.m. Mass in the Mission Church
    6 p.m. Reception, Dinner, & Program

    $75 per person
    $50 per Young Alumni ('05-'14)

    Click Here to RSVP >>
     


    Cost: $75 per person; $50 per Young Alumni ('05-'14)
    Location: Mission Gardens
Travel Program
Travel Talk
Ursula King Lecture: Pioneer in the Dialogue Between Religion and Science
  • Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015 from 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM

    Event is co-sponsored by Santa Clara Universty: Office of the President, SCU Jesuit School of Theology, Religious Studies Department, Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, Program in Catholic Studies, Santa Clara Jesuite Community, and by the Catholic Community at Stanford.


    Location: Mission Church
Vintage Santa Clara XXXII
  • Sunday, Sep 13, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM

     

    Don't miss the 32nd annual Vintage Santa Clara food and wine festival! Featuring over 50 food and wine booths, live music, and fun for all. Proceeds from the event support the Alumni Family Scholarship program.

    Tickets for the event will go on sale Monday, August 3 at 8 a.m. PST.


    Cost: TBD
    Location: Mission Gardens
Want to help with OLLI Courses? Consider volunteering for the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee.
  • Tuesday, May 26, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    The Curriculum Committee, whose present members were profiled in the last issue of The Link, is responsible for selecting, organizing, and evaluating all of OLLI’s courses.  The Committee is also responsible for the popular Destination Learning program and the OLLI Distinguished Speaker Series.  The Curriculum Committee meets monthly and members, except for the Chair, serve two-year terms.  New terms begin on July 1.  I am now working on new appointments or reappointments for 2015 – 2017.  

    If you are interested in joining the Curriculum Committee, please send me (salzbaum@sbcglobal.net) your name, contact information, and either a current CV/resume or a brief description of your background and reason for interest. Potential new members will be invited to the May meeting of the Committee to learn more about its work from current members.  

    Liz Salzer, Curriculum Committee Chair, 2013 - 2016

    Location: Loyola Hall
Wind Symphony Concert
First Name
Last Name
Email Address
 
If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please contact or 408-551-6068 two weeks prior to the event.

Jesuit Education at SCU

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Caring for the whole person.
An important principle of Jesuit education is care for the whole person. The Jesuit philosophy places a student's humanity first, creating a personalized educational environment where thoughtful questions can be considered.
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