Events

Upcoming events within the Ignatian Center.

"Economy and Security in the 21st Century" with Madeleine Albright
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    How can America retain its leadership role amidst rapid globalization? Is America truly the indispensable nation? How do domestic politics influence foreign policy?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
#TWEET: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     Contemporary music technology, 16th century madrigals, and everything in between. The songs of birds serve as a starting place for an evening full of innovation from one of the original sources of musical inspiration. Combined with live audience feedback and interactive compositions, it’s a night where you'll want to make sure your smartphone is anything but off.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
?The Clue to Everything": A History of Sicily
  • Saturday, Mar 7, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Sicily is the most magical, mythic, monster-plagued, and mistreated place in the Mediterranean, and mother of some of the foundation stories of Western Civilization.  In following a chronology of her three thousand years, we’ll meet heroes from Ulysses, Æneas, and Archimedes to Giovanni Falcone, and monsters from Cyclops to mafiosi from Corleone. We’ll examine how Sicily became the wellspring of Western Civilization under Greeks; was trampled down by Romans and Byzantines; became the glory of Europe again under Arabs and Normans, igniting the Renaissance; and was then left to rot by the Spanish. We’ll conclude with the arrival of Garibaldi in the west, Patton in the south, and Francis Ford Coppola in the east (not all at the same time). Sicily is an unexpectedly subtle, fascinating, and wounded place that is central to our Western story. 

    Instructor: Douglas Kenning, a popular instructor for lifelong learning programs, received a PhD from the University of  Edinburgh, Scotland, and has lived as a university assistant professor in Tunisia, Japan, Italy, and the USA.  He has been a biologist, actor, army officer, Manhattan taxi driver, academic administrator, and writer of books, articles, and stage plays.  He lives half the year in the Bay Area, giving lectures on subjects related to Mediterranean histories and cultures, and half the year in Siracusa, Sicily, where he runs a non-profit, Sicily Tour, giving tours and arranging cultural exchanges.  He says the speed of this history is 799.25 years per hour!

    Short Course, Other Dates:  March 5

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
Advent Afternoon of Reflection
  • Sunday, Dec 7, 2014 from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM

    Amid the crush of Christmas activities and mindful of the busyness of the season, Fr. Rob Scholla, S.J. will lead us in reflecting on the gifts of our God who comes to us at Christmas. Using scripture, poetry and works of religious art, Fr. Scholla, S.J. will facilitate this time together.  Light lunch will be served. All are welcome! Cost:   $25  per person 

    RSVP


    Cost: $25
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Advent Celebration
Advent Reconciliation
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
An Evening with Andy Ackerman
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Hear Andy Ackerman ’78 in conversation about directing and producing some of TV’s funniest and most beloved series, including Seinfeld, The New Adventures of Old Christine, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
Armchair Traveler Visits West Africa Today: Contemporary Village Life in Burkina Faso
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Many of our conceptions of Africa are misconceptions. We seldom see what life is like on a day-to-day basis. The Western media routinely offers negative images of conflict, famine and disease. At the other extreme we encounter images of exotic tribal cultures and safari adventures. My experience living in West Africa has given me a different perspective. For nearly a decade, I have spent two months each year in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water, in the country of Burkina Faso. I am photographing the activities of daily life. The Friday Night series documents the weekly dance at a small outdoor club called Le Cotonnier, where villagers dance all night under the stars on a small patch of concrete. The Sur La Route series features portraits of farmers as they travel home at twilight along a dirt path that passes by the house where I live. I also photograph villagers at work in the local brick quarry, in the gold mines, in their fields and in the market.  Photographing as a member of the community, I strive to portray the strength and dignity that I see in my friends and neighbors, capturing the beauty and complexity of a simple village. In this class, I will share my experiences and images of life in Bereba and present a unique perspective on West Africa.

    Instructor: David Pace has been teaching photography in the San Francisco Bay Area for more than 20 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, Pace spent ten weeks each fall in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. Pace received the 2011 Work-In-Process Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and Daylight Magazine.  His work was included in the 2012 biennial Anthology at the Southeast Museum of Photography. He has had solo exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA; Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR; 511 Gallery in New York City; Corden/Potts Gallery in San Francisco; the Camerawork Gallery in Portland, OR; andthe World Affairs Council in San Francisco. Pace’s photographs of rural Africa have appeared in LensCulture, aCurator.com, Slate, Daylight Magazine, Lenscratch, Photo District News (PDN), The Atlantic Cities, View (Germany). His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and in the Art Photo Index (API).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 12, 19

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Thursday, Feb 19, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Many of our conceptions of Africa are misconceptions. We seldom see what life is like on a day-to-day basis. The Western media routinely offers negative images of conflict, famine and disease. At the other extreme we encounter images of exotic tribal cultures and safari adventures. My experience living in West Africa has given me a different perspective. For nearly a decade, I have spent two months each year in Bereba, a remote village without electricity or running water, in the country of Burkina Faso. I am photographing the activities of daily life. The Friday Night series documents the weekly dance at a small outdoor club called Le Cotonnier, where villagers dance all night under the stars on a small patch of concrete. The Sur La Route series features portraits of farmers as they travel home at twilight along a dirt path that passes by the house where I live. I also photograph villagers at work in the local brick quarry, in the gold mines, in their fields and in the market.  Photographing as a member of the community, I strive to portray the strength and dignity that I see in my friends and neighbors, capturing the beauty and complexity of a simple village. In this class, I will share my experiences and images of life in Bereba and present a unique perspective on West Africa.

    Instructor: David Pace has been teaching photography in the San Francisco Bay Area for more than 20 years. As Resident Director of Santa Clara University’s study abroad program in West Africa from 2009 – 2013, Pace spent ten weeks each fall in the small country of Burkina Faso, where he has been photographing annually since 2007. Pace received the 2011 Work-In-Process Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and Daylight Magazine.  His work was included in the 2012 biennial Anthology at the Southeast Museum of Photography. He has had solo exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA; Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, OR; 511 Gallery in New York City; Corden/Potts Gallery in San Francisco; the Camerawork Gallery in Portland, OR; andthe World Affairs Council in San Francisco. Pace’s photographs of rural Africa have appeared in LensCulture, aCurator.com, Slate, Daylight Magazine, Lenscratch, Photo District News (PDN), The Atlantic Cities, View (Germany). His work has been featured on NPR’s The Picture Show and in the Art Photo Index (API).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 12, 19

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Ash Wednesday Tri-School Liturgy
Bad Girls of the Bible
  • Monday, Jan 5, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Jan 12, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Feb 2, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

    Register Here

    Hero and harlot, victor and victim, deviant and divine, revolutionary and repressed, courageous and catty – the stories of women in the Bible offer a treasure trove of intrigue and insight.  We will examine both famous and ignored “bad girls of the Bible” and unearth stories of resistance, creativity, and power.  Using feminist hermeneutics and a close reading of the biblical text, this course will explore the continuing impact these biblical women may have for subverting contemporary paradigms of oppression, domination and violence, and fostering new ways of seeing and being in the world.   

    Instructor: Diana Gibson is an Academic Year Annual Lecturer at Santa Clara University in the Religious Studies Department.  She teaches classes on scripture, justice, liberation theology, feminism, and human suffering.  She is an ordained Presbyterian pastor and received her Doctorate of Ministry working with biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
Beautiful Gardens: Then and Now
  • Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Optional Field Trip Saturday, March 21
     
    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Mar 5, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Optional Field Trip Saturday, March 21
     
    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Optional Field Trip Saturday, March 21
     
    What makes gardens beautiful and memorable?  We'll begin by examining features such as fountains and hedges that help create a harmonious design.  We'll look at European and American gardens from the Renaissance up to today, both iconic examples and some less familiar, illustrated with historic views (prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture and photographs), as well as contemporary images.
    Our tour begins in Italy at Medici gardens in and outside of Florence, created in the late 16th century, then in Rome and its environs, including Villa d'Este at Tivoli, of grander, more ambitious designs.  A century later, we move to France to survey the brilliant landscapes created by André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV's many royal residences.  By the 18th century, innovative ideas in England open gardens to the surrounding landscape.  The 19th century witnessed the rise of smaller, domestic gardens and the emergence of urban parks.  By the end of that century, the new profession of landscape designer arose.  By the early 20th century, with ever-increasing ease of travel, wealthy Americans adapted iconic European gardens in such examples as Filoli and Villa Montalvo. 

    Recent garden designs have begun to address such issues as health, sustainability, and drought, through an expanded palette of plants.  Among the byways we will look at are sculpture gardens.  Art and gardens form a rich companionship.    

    Instructor: Betsy G. Fryberger was the McMurtry Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, until her retirement in 2009 after some forty years at the museum. Among her favorite projects and publications was the 2003 exhibition catalogue The Changing Garden: Four Centuries of European and American Art, chosen by both the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best books about gardens published that year.  This is Betsy’s first Osher course.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 26 and March 5, 12 

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Behind the Scenes: Santa Clara Chorale's
  • Thursday, Dec 11, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.

    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Dec 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.

    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Book of the Quarter: We Need New Names
  • Thursday, Feb 26, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

    Join the University Library in welcoming author NoViolet Bulaway, author of We Need New Names. Bulawayo will read excerpts from and discuss her book as well as take questions from faculty, staff and students.

    From the book jacket:

    A remarkable literary debut -- shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize! The unflinching and powerful story of a young girl's journey out of Zimbabwe and to America.

    Darling is only ten years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo's belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad.

    But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America's famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few. NoViolet Bulawayo's debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her-from Junot Diaz to Zadie Smith to J.M. Coetzee-while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.”

    All SCU students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend.

    This event is co-sponsored with Silicon Valley Reads, an annual community program engaging the public in reading, thinking and discussion.

     


    Location: Learning Commons and Library, St. Clare Room
Boston AFO- Volunteer at Greater Boston Food Bank
Broncos @ Saint Mary's Men's Basketball Game
  • Saturday, Dec 27, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

     

    $30 PER PERSON

    Catch all the action as the Broncos take on the Gaels in Moraga! The Alumni Association and Santa Clara Athletics have secured a limited number of tickets for our East Bay Alumni. Buy yours today! Due to the proximity to the holidays, we will not be hosting a pre-game reception, but we hope to meet you at the game and share your holiday cheer. 

     

    RSVP ONLINE

Broncos Take On The Spartans: Meet & Greet
  • Sunday, Nov 23, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM

    Join fellow Broncos as you watch the men's basketball team prepare for their game against the Spartans of Michigan State. A player and coach meet and greet will follow practice.

    The time for this event will be between 10am and 2pm. Once a final practice time is scheduled, the Alumni Association will contact you immediately with more event details.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Breslin Center, Michigan State Campus
Broncos Take On The Spartans: Reception & Basketball Game
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 6:30 PM

    Enjoy a reception prior to the Santa Clara versus Michigan State men's basketball game! The reception will feature food, drink, and a "chalk talk" from a member of the coaching staff. Following the reception, guests will attend the basketball game and cheer the Broncos on to victory!

    $30 per person includes heavy hosted appetizers and a game ticket.

    RSVP Online
     


    Cost: $30 per person
    Location:
         Dubling Square Pub and Breslin Center
Bruno Ruviaro - Electronic Music
Careers for the Common Good Industry Panel
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    A panel of alums and other professionals working in industries including social entrepreneurship, healthcare, corporate social responsibility, nonprofits and more will share their reflections and insights on their work and industry.  The panel will be followed by an informal networking hour.


    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Challenges to the Indian Judicial System
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM

     Justice Dinakaran has a disposition of over 87,000 cases, has written several papers, and is a very distinguished person in the Indian Judiciary System. He will be here to talk about the challenges facing the Indian judiciary and how that affects the common person.


    Location:
         Bannan Room 139
Challenges to the Indian Judicial System
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 at 12:00 PM

     Justice Dinakaran has a disposition of over 87,000 cases, has written several papers, and is a very distinguished person in the Indian Judiciary System. He will be here to talk about the challenges facing the Indian judiciary and how that affects the common person.


    Location:
         Bannan Room 139
Chapter Workshop
Classical Electronic Music: Is There Such a Thing?
  • Friday, Jan 16, 2015 from 8:30 AM to 10:30 AM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-concert discussion.
     
    Is there such a thing as "classical electronic music"? What software would Mozart be using to compose music, if he was alive today? This course presents a gentle introduction to modern electroacoustic music.  Familiar terms such as melody, harmony, and rhythm are revisited and expanded under a new light.  Innovative and unconventional concepts such as acousmatic music and orchestra of loudspeakers will be introduced with plenty of musical examples.  Following the lecture, class participants are invited to a performance by the instructor, as a part of SCU’s “Faculty Recital Series.” A post-concert discussion will follow the performance.

    Instructor: Bruno Tucunduva Ruviaro is a Brazilian-born composer and performer from São Paulo.  Before joining the Santa Clara University faculty in the Fall of 2012, he was often found at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University. He now lives in San Francisco and seems to enjoy riding Caltrain every day.  His main field of research is Music Composition, with an emphasis in Electronic Music. Related interests include: electronic music composition; laptop orchestras; live-electronics; acousmatic music; sampling and musical borrowing; and music and politics.

    A selection of Bruno's scores, recordings, and texts can be found at: www.brunoruviaro.com

    Short Course, Other Dates:  January 16 (Class) 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

                                                    January 23 (Performance)  7:30 PM

    Location: TBA 

     


    Cost: 40.00
  • Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-concert discussion.
     
    Is there such a thing as "classical electronic music"? What software would Mozart be using to compose music, if he was alive today? This course presents a gentle introduction to modern electroacoustic music.  Familiar terms such as melody, harmony, and rhythm are revisited and expanded under a new light.  Innovative and unconventional concepts such as acousmatic music and orchestra of loudspeakers will be introduced with plenty of musical examples.  Following the lecture, class participants are invited to a performance by the instructor, as a part of SCU’s “Faculty Recital Series.” A post-concert discussion will follow the performance.

    Instructor: Bruno Tucunduva Ruviaro is a Brazilian-born composer and performer from São Paulo.  Before joining the Santa Clara University faculty in the Fall of 2012, he was often found at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University. He now lives in San Francisco and seems to enjoy riding Caltrain every day.  His main field of research is Music Composition, with an emphasis in Electronic Music. Related interests include: electronic music composition; laptop orchestras; live-electronics; acousmatic music; sampling and musical borrowing; and music and politics.

    A selection of Bruno's scores, recordings, and texts can be found at: www.brunoruviaro.com

    Short Course, Other Dates:  January 16 (Class) 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

                                                    January 23 (Performance)  7:30 PM

    Location: TBA 

     


    Cost: 40.00
Climate Change in the 21st Century
  • Monday, Dec 1, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
Combined Choral Concert
Commencement Recital
CPSY X231:Prenatal and Postpartum Mood Disorders
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
    CPSY X231:Prenatal and Postpartum Mood Disorders
    Saturday, February 28, 9AM-5PM
    Rm. 136, $145
     

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
    Up to 20% of women experience mood disorders during pregnancy and the postpartum period; many are undiagnosed and untreated.  The consequences of untreated maternal illness can include low birth weight and preterm labor, chronic depression and relapse, relationship discord, cognitive and developmental delays in the infant, childhood modd disturbance, and potentially suicide and infanticide.
     
    We will cover risk factors and prenatal and postpartum screening.  We will learn to differentiate between depression/anxiety, panic, OCD, PTSD, and psychosis as seen in pregnancy and postpartum period. Treatment modalities and specific techniques will be discussed as they relate to perinatal mood disorders, specifically: Interpersonal therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and group therapy. Psychopharmacological treatment, in particular during pregnancy and nursing, will be reviewed. You will learn about resources available for pregnant and postpartum women and families. 
     
     
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Pec Indman, Ed.D., MFT has worked in the field of perinatal mood disorders for the past seventeen years. Dr. Indman has her Ed.D. from USF, and a M.A. in health psychology from Santa Clara University. Additionally, she trained as a family practice physician's assistant, and worked in family practice, women's health and health promotion. As Director of Women’s Health for Regroup Therapy, she’s involved with web based psychotherapy 
    and support groups. She is involved with several international organizations dedicated to perinatal mental health, and has been an invited participant on several federal grants on perinatal mood disorders. Dr. Indamn is co-author 
    of the book Beyond the Blues, Understanding and Treating Prenatal and Postpartum Depression & Anxiety. (Moodswings Press: 2010) 

     


    Cost: $145
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 136
CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy

    DATE: Saturday, December 6 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This course will present Aperture as the powerful central focus for couples therapy. In it we will discuss the neurological concomitants of this openness, what we know about the conditions that result in opening or closing, interventions for maximal effectiveness in opening apertures, use of the evaluation and early sessions in relation to ApertureTM, maximizing early progress, and the relationship between ApertureTM as a focus and the various models for couples therapy.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Explain the relevance of a focus on Aperture for couples therapy.
    • Be able to practice the interventions flexibly in response to the diversity, culturally and otherwise, in their clients.
    • Describe the possible neurological correlates of Aperture.
    • Discuss how to use Aperture awareness to guide their interventions.
    • Perform interventions for opening Aperture through: eye contact, pacing, balance, internal self-management, reassurance, and inquiry.
    • Describe the relationship between Aperture focus and treatment models.
    • Discuss methods for maximizing early change.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: This course is appropriate for clinical practitioners working with individual, couples or families and for graduate students working toward degrees leading to the practice of psychotherapy including individual, couples and family therapies.

    Level: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Kathryn Ford, M.D. has been working with couples for 20 years and has a private practice in Menlo Park. She has developed Learning Partners, an approach to helping couples see their difficulties as part of their development and to bring their creative strengths into the relationship. She has taught and supervised at Stanford University School of Medicine and at local graduate schools of psychology, including The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology and Santa Clara University. She received her M.D. from Brown Medical School and completed her training in psychiatry at Stanford.

     

    In addition to teaching and her clinical practice, Dr. Ford offers individuals a group consultation to therapists and workshops for both couples and therapists.   


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x550: Secrets in Psychotherapy: Concealment, Disclosure, and Therapeutic Success
  • Saturday, Jan 17, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x550 - Secrets in Psychotherapy: Concealment, Disclosure, and Therapeutic Success

    DATE: Saturday, January 17th

    TIME: 9-4 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

    Course meets the qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Register for WInter »

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Most therapists have witnessed how a client’s disclosure of troubling personal information can often be a turning point in therapy, but the process of uncovering long-hidden areas of experience challenges both client and therapist. Secrets that are most tightly held, such as sexual abuse, rape, self-hatred, extramarital affairs, disenfranchised grief, and serious medical conditions, including HIV-status, are painful and often stigmatized experiences. Navigating this world of secrets and helping clients negotiate conflicts surrounding disclosure are hallmarks of the effective therapist.
     
    This one-day seminar will look at secrets in everyday clinical practice and identify
    therapeutic techniques and relationship qualities that can bring the dialectic of concealment and disclosure into the center of therapeutic action. Recent work on self-concealment, trauma disclosure, covert processes in therapy, therapist and client disclosure, and end-of-life closure will inform lectures and discussion.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dale G. Larson, Ph.D. is a Fulbright Scholar, a Fellow in the American Psychological Association (Division 17, Counseling Psychology, and Division 38, Health Psychology), and a licensed clinical psychologist and marriage and family therapist.  His academic interests bridge counseling and health psychology, including self-concealment, stress management, process experiential therapy, and a variety of issues in the end-of-life area, such as grief counseling research, interdisciplinary team development, and advanced illness care coordination. A recognized national leader in end-of-life care and training, Larson was Senior Editor and a contributing author for the Robert Wood Johnson-funded national newspaper series, Finding Our Way: Living with Dying in America, which reached 7 million Americans.   

    Larson has published extensively in his areas of interest, and is the editor of the text, Teaching Psychological Skills: Models for Giving Psychology Away, and the author of the award-winning book, The Helper's Journey:  Working With People Facing Grief, Loss, and Life-Threatening  Illness.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 136
CPSY x647: Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CPSY x647– Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting

    DATE: Friday, December 5 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-5PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $192

     

     

     

    Course meets the qualifications for 7 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The course will meet all of the requirements of California Business and Professions Code Section 28. Training will be provided in child abuse assessment and reporting including detailed knowledge of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act and the assessment and method of reporting of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporal punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
     
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES
    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:
    • Discuss mandatory child abuse law requirements, rights, responsibilities, and methods of reporting.
    • Recite law definitions of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporate punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
    • Predict consequences of failure to report, and assess how to provide for a child's need after a report is made.
    • Discuss assessment considerations.
    • Discuss basic crisis counseling considerations and techniques.
    • Explain the impact of abuse and neglect on children and adults.
    • Predict traumatic impact of abuse and neglect and related implications for treatment, and evidence based forms of treatment for children and adults.
     

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Marriage & Family Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students and Undergraduate Students. 

    LEVEL: Intermediate

     INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Steve Baron, M.A., MFT, is the retired director of Family Court Services in Santa Clara County, California, former adjunct faculty for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on the subject of juvenile dependency mediation, retired from 25 years of private practice, an occasional trainer for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Superior Court in Santa Clara County, and various community agencies on subjects including domestic violence, the impact of trauma on child development and victims of domestic violence, trauma-informed systems, mediation and custody evaluation, and ethics, and has been the recipient of awards from Legal Advocates for Children and Youth for services to families and children, “The Judge Len Edwards Champion of Peace Award” from the Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council, and the Santa Clara County Psychological Association for the training of mental health professionals in the areas of divorce, child custody, and domestic violence.  He has been a lecturer for Santa Clara University in the graduate Counseling Psychology division for the past 27 years on subjects including child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse, and trauma. He has authored or co-authored articles for the Family Court Review, California’s Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, and the Juvenile and Family Court Journal.

     


    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy
  • Friday, Jan 23, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Jan 24, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy

    DATE: Friday, January 23rd &  Saturday, January 24 *Must register by January 14

    TIME: 9-3PM each day (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    WORKSHOP FEE: $288

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 9.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Systemic and intrapsychic perspectives are provided as organizing frameworks for treating sexual desire discrepancy, with special attention to understanding the meaning underneath details of sexual behavior. The course emphasizes using sexual difficulties for psychological and emotional development. The course includes practical application (via case studies, role plays, and skill building exercises) for better learning, understanding and integration of this perspective into clinical practice. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe the systemic concept of desire discrepancy within a couple.
    • List some common presentations of this clinical problem.
    • Recognize differences in the systemic relationship between desire discrepancy and other common relationship problems.
    • Compare the systemic nature of desire discrepancy to other more linear clinical approaches.
    • Formulate a systemic "big picture" description of the couple dynamics.
    • Demonstrate how to intervene in the couple system using this "big picture" to provide forward movement in the system.
    • Analyze family of origin, dyadic and intrapsychic issues displayed through the clients' sexual behavior. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Clinicians wishing to expand and update their expertise treating sexual desire discrepancy and other sexual difficulties. This 10-hour course will fulfill the BBS requirement for study of human sexuality.

    Level: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Monica Stone MFT maintains a full time private practice in Menlo Park where she treats couples and individuals and runs time limited women's sexuality groups. She has specialized in treating sexual issues since 1996, receiving her AASECT Sex Therapist Certification in 2001. 


    Cost: $288
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 138
CPSY x855: Aging and Relationships
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Feb 7, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 1:15 PM
    CPSY x855 – Aging and Relationships
    TWO DAY WORKSHOP: Saturday, February 6, 9AM-4:30PM and Sunday, February 7, 9AM – 1:15PM
    Rm. 160, $288
     

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    As the population grays, we will see more and more people in the 60 plus age group. Is there anything unique about this population? Are there problems and issues specific to aging that are within the expertise of the counselor?
     
    Aging can be considered a continuum. On one end are the seriously distressed. Here clients may be concerned about memory gaps, disorientation, and general loss of function. This may include those who are dementing, depressed, or severely anxious. The counselor needs to be aware of the signs and symptoms of these disorders as well as the treatment opportunities.
     
    On the other end of the continuum are those who have been consciously successful at aging. Here are people who seem to be alive and present. They enjoy all aspects of their lives and continue to grow and make new memories. What are the values, attitudes, and behaviors that contribute to this? These qualities are teachable and the counseling format may be the most appropriate context to teach them.
     
     
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Hayes has had a dual career as a therapist and u teacher since 1966. After Spending three years working in State hospitals and five and one half years working for Santa Clara County Mental Health, he began his private practice. He continues his practice in Saratoga, working with individuals, couples and seniors.
     
    He has taught at a number of colleges and universities including San Jose State and, for thirty five years, at Santa Clara University. Even though he taught courses in Psychopathology and Clinical Assessment, his main interest has been Health Psychology.
     
    He spent twenty five years focusing on chronic illness and worked closely with the Multiple Sclerosis Society. He was able to bring this interest to Santa Clara University by starting the Master’s program in Health Psychology. From there it was an easy transition to his interest in Aging as a component of Health Psychology.
     
    For ten years now Dr. Hayes has led courses on Aging for the Center for Professional Development as well as giving talks and seminars at various hospitals in the area.
     
    From his beginnings as a Health Psychologist, Dr. Hayes has been interested in how individuals form the experience of themselves. Bodies evolve and change. Aging certainly involves physical and psychological change. Yet individuals continue to create and maintain an identity, often transforming these changes into consciousness and growth.
     
     

     


    Cost: $288
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x932: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
  • Saturday, Mar 14, 2015 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x932– Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychotherapy
    This course is available as a 4 hour or 6 hour course.

    Saturday, March 14, 9-1:15PM, Rm. 160, $96
    OR
    Saturday, March 14, 9-4:30PM, Rm. 160, $168

    Register for WInter »

     
     
     
     
     
     
    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION
     
    Tired of listening to someone spew information at you all day? This day-long interactive workshop will provide you with the information you need, but will also give you a chance to sharpen your own ethical decision-making skills at the same time. We will discuss issues of informed consent, confidentiality, reporting laws, client rights and counselor responsibilities, etc. The format will include case studies, brief presentations, discussion, and didactic exercises designed to help you explore your own values and ethical framework. This workshop is tailed specifically for MFT’s.
     
    INSTRUCTOR BIO
     
    A former Jesuit, Donald St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministries and Counseling Psychology.
    St. Louis completed his D.Min. from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. in 1986. He is the Founder and Director of The California Institute for Sexual Recovery in San Francisco and maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in San Francisco and Santa Clara. A former Jesuit, St. Louis specializes in the integration of psychology and theology and is active in counselor education in a variety of settings. He teaches courses in both the Graduate Program in Counseling Psychology and Pastoral Ministries.

     

     

    Cost: $96/$168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Deadline for late registration/full refund/oral defense
Democracy in Crisis: Europe and the EU
  • Monday, Jan 5, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Jan 12, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Jan 26, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Feb 2, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    In May 2014, EU parliamentary elections highlighted the chasm that has come to exist between European governments, the EU and the European public. This election brings up very big questions about democracy in Europe and the long-simmering popular backlash against the EU. This course on current European and EU politics will examine how European governments and EU government institutions work, with a focus on representation and democratic accountability in parliamentary government. We will discuss how well European political systems absorb and resolve recent challenges such as the Euro-crisis, immigration and disillusionment with the EU. Finally we will explore the consequences of a possible British exit from the EU.

    Instructor: Diana Morlang is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at SCU. She teaches courses on comparative politics, European politics and the EU, American economic policy, and research methods. She also works as an undergraduate advisor in the Drahmann Advising Center on campus. Diana holds a B.S. in International Relations from UC Davis and a Ph. D. from Duke University in Political Science. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 5, 12, 26 and February 2, 9

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand 102

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES Remembering FDR
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here 

    Historians consistently rank Franklin D. Roosevelt as among the most consequential of presidents. His unmatched twelve-year-tenure in the White House changed the terms of life for generations of Americans thereafter, and transformed the international system as well as America’s role in it, in ways that persist well into the twenty-first century. This presentation will explore the sources – personal as well as historical – of Roosevelt’s remarkably deep and durable legacy.

    Speaker:  David M. Kennedy is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History Emeritus and Director Emeritus of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. For more than four decades he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses at Stanford in the history of the twentieth-century United States, American political and social thought, American foreign policy, American literature, and the comparative development of democracy in Europe and America. Graduating seniors have four times elected him as Class Day speaker. He has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. In 2008, the Yale University Graduate School presented him with the Wilbur Cross Medal, its highest honor. He has also written about a broad range of subjects in American history. Originally from Seattle, he earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford in 1963 and his PhD from Yale University in 1968.

    Social Gathering:  9:30 AM - 10:00 AM  
    Event:  10:00 AM - 12:00 PM                           

    Event Location:  Fess Parker Studio Theatre 


     

     


    Cost: 25.00
    Location: Mayer Theatre, Fess Parker Studio Theatre
Distinguished Speaker: Kaiser Permanente and the Future of Medicine in America
  • Saturday, Jan 31, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

     

    Preceded by social gathering 9:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
     
    There are many who feel that Kaiser Permanente is the model for the future of medicine in the United States.  As the Physician in Chief of the Kaiser hospital in Santa Clara, which serves more than 300,000 members in Santa Clara County, Dr. Susan Smarr will address the current status of its operation and share her vision on how they will deal with the issues and challenges of the future.

    Instructor: Dr. Susan Smarr is originally from Savannah, Georgia, and graduated from Duke University with a BS in Botany.  After earning her medical degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, she went on to complete her residency in obstetrics and gynecology there.  She joined Kaiser Permanente in 1987.  Prior to being named the physician-in-chief at its Santa Clara Medical Center, Dr. Smarr held a variety of leadership positions, including chief of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, as well as chief of quality for the medical center.  She is involved in teaching both medical students and residents and is on the teaching faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  January 31, 2015

    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102

     


    Cost: 25.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2015
East Bay Warriors Game
  • Wednesday, Mar 18, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Come watch as the Warriors take on the Atlanta Hawks, two playoff teams from the year before. We will also be courtside for the pre-game shoot around warm ups.

     

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 Per Person
    Location:
         Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way Oakland, CA 94621
Easter Bunny Brunch
Easter: Library Closed
EDUC x520: Mindful Discipline: A Loving Approach to Setting Limits and Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child
  • Monday, Jan 19, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x520: Mindful Discipline: A Loving Approach to Setting Limits and Raising an  Emotionally Intelligent Child

    DATE: Monday, January 19 *Must register by December 15 to receive book on time

    TIME: 2-5PM 

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $65 per person. Special Offer for Couples: $100 per couple.(Book included with fee)

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    In this workshop, mindfulness expert Shauna Shapiro weaves together ancient wisdom and modern science to provide new perspectives on parenting and discipline. The workshop is based on her new coauthored book, Mindful Discipline: A Loving approach to Setting Limits and Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child. Dr. Shapiro redefines discipline and outlines the five essential  elements necessary for children to thrive: unconditional love, space for children to be themselves, mentorship, healthy boundaries, and mistakes that create learning and growth opportunities. Parents and educators will also discover practices such as setting limits with love, working with difficult emotions, and forgiveness and compassion meditations that place discipline within a  context of mindfulness. This relationship centered approach will restore your confidence and support your children in developing emotional intelligence, self-discipline and resilience—qualities they need for living an authentic and meaningful life.

    Learning Objectives

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to:

    • Describe the key elements of mindfulness
    • Explain the importance of intention in mindfulness practice
    • Describe specific attitudes of mindfulness
    • Explain the importance of neuroplasticity for mindfulness practice
    • Describe the five key elements of Mindful Discipline
    • Explain the importance of self-compassion in parenting

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Parents
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists
    • Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
    • Physicians
    • Others

    Instructor Bio

    Shauna Shapiro, PhD, is a professor, clinical psychologist, and internationally recognized expert in mindfulness. With twenty years of meditation experience studying in Thailand and Nepal, as well as in the West, Shapiro brings an embodied sense of mindfulness to her scientific work. She has published over 100 journal articles and chapters, and coauthored the critically acclaimed book, The Art and Science of Mindfulness, as well as her new book, Mindful Discipline: A loving approach to setting limits and raising an emotionally intelligent child. Dr. Shapiro is the recipient of the American Council of Learned Societies teaching award, acknowledging her outstanding contributions to graduate education, as well as a Contemplative Practice fellow of the Mind and Life Institute co-founded by the Dalai Lama. Dr. Shapiro has been invited to lecture for the King of Thailand, the Danish government, and the World Council for Psychotherapy in Beijing, China. Her work has been featured in Wired, USA Today, Oxygen, The Yoga Journal, and the American Psychologist. She lives in Mill Valley, CA with her 9-year-old son, Jackson.


    Cost: $65,$100
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers
  • Saturday, Jan 31, 2015 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers

    DATE: Saturday, January 31 *Must register by Wednesday, January 21st

    TIME: 8AM-5PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement

    Register for Winter »

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse; staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location:
         Room 138
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)
  • Monday, Jan 12, 2015 to Friday, Jan 16, 2015

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)

    DATE: January 12th through January 16th, 2015 *Must register by December 24

    TIME: Any time that works for you.But assignments must be completed by due date.

    LOCATION: Anywhere you have access to the internet.

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement.

    Register for WInter »

     

     



    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Friday, December 5 *Must register by November 26

    Time: 1-5PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 137
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Friday, Jan 30, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Friday, January 30 *Must register by January 21st

    Time: 1-5PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    Workshop Fee: $55

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 138
EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online Course)
  • Monday, Jun 16, 2014 to Wednesday, Dec 31, 2014

    EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online)

    DATE: Since this is an online, asynchronous course, there is NO official start date.  A link to the course will be sent within 72 hours of registration, at which point you will have a minimum of two weeks and a maximum of six months to complete the course. The link will be sent to the email address you provide during registration.

    TIME: At your convenience. 

    LOCATION: Online

    Workshop Fee: $285

    Register Here! 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Welcome to Advanced Classroom Management: Children as Change Agents, a course geared primarily for professionals (e.g., regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologist, counselors) serving children and youths presenting behavior problems in the school or community.  This course focuses on cognitive and cognitive-behavioral interventions (often lumped together under the rubric "social skills") with an emphasis on teaching students how to change and manage their own behavior.  Since previous knowledge and understanding of traditional behavioral (operant) concepts and strategies is required, it is strongly recommended that you take an introductory behavior management course to learn the basic terms and concepts of behavior management prior to taking this “advanced” course.
     
    OBJECTIVES

    As a result of this course, participants will demonstrate their ability to:

    • Know the terminology in the areas of behavior management, self-management and cognitive-behavior modification
    • Know the relative merits and limitations of the behavioral and social-cognitive approaches to behavior management
    • Understand the rationale for teaching students how to self-manage their behavior  
    • Understand the roles that cognitions and emotions play in the development of behavior problems
    • Apply the self-management strategies covered in the course to the behavior problems of their own students 
    • Diagnose behavior problems and assess the efficacy of self-management interventions
    • Increase the probability of students using self-management strategies in and outside of the classroom setting 
Engineering Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Engineering


    Location: Locatelli Center
Faculty Chamber Music
Fall Semester 2014 Ends
Family Weekend
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 to Saturday, Feb 21, 2015

     Santa Clara parents are important members of the SCU community. We thank each family for their support and partnership with all students through their journey here at Santa Clara University.

    We want to extend a special invitation to join us on campus for the 2015 Family Weekend. These events provide you with a great opportunity to learn more about the University and spend some quality time in a fun, social environment with your SCU student.

Feast of Juan Diego
Festival of Lights: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     A festival of lights can have many religious and cultural meanings for people across the world. The Jewish holiday, Hanukkah and the Hindu holiday, Diwali (Tihar), both draw on the imagery of lighting lamps or candles. Culturally, many cities celebrate the change of seasons and the lengthening of days by lighting landmarks in vast and complex displays, and here at Santa Clara University, the Festival of Lights performance has marked the beginning of the holiday season for many for over a decade. The Festival of Lights program draws on many traditions, those formed here and those celebrated across the world, as it explores the changes of the seasons, a variety of holiday traditions, and concludes with a stunning arrangement of Silent Night sung by candle light in the beautiful Santa Clara Mission Church. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers
Film Odyssey: Working Stiffs - Films about People Who Labor
  • Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Women and men at work - the pleasures and the pains of working 9 to 5 – that’s the theme of this special edition of Film Odyssey!  Please join filmmaker and historian Mark Larson for this tour of cinematic treasures from Hollywood and around the world, depicting the complex world of labor (and capital too!). See Melanie Griffith divide and conquer in Working Girl (1988); watch a bus driver change the world in Mr. Thank You (1935); Doris Day fights for seven and a half cents in The Pajama Game (1957); William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck balance the books in Executive Suite (1954); and revel in a special double bill of two classic short films - Work (1915) from Charlie Chaplin and the beautiful Fake Fruit Factory (1986) from the late Bay Area filmmaker Chick Strand.   A robust and open discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor: Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years.  His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013 and produced at Marquette University in November 2014.  In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose.  A film, based on this work, is currently in production and will be presented in 2015.  Mark, who is one of Osher’s most popular instructors, is now taking some time off from his work in film and theatre to concentrate on reading Homer; listening to Bach, Ellington, and Bernstein; and watching every episode of Columbo with his daughter. 

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
French Conversation Table
  • Monday, Dec 1, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
Freshman/Sophomore Internship Fair
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU freshmen & sophomores of all majors.


    Location: Locatelli Center
From the Supreme Court to Legislated Death: Current U.S. Legal Issues Series
  • Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Mar 11, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Based on their individual expertise, a different Santa Clara Law School faculty member will teach each of the five classes on major legal issues.  Leading off will be Professor Margaret Russell who will address the United States Supreme Court.  She will profile the nine justices, explain the implications of recent decisions, and identify major pending cases.  The second class will analyze immigration laws.  Professor Lynette Parker will address existing laws and the evolving emphasis on legal and illegal immigration.  The third class by Ellen Kreitzberg will examine the death penalty and whether California has witnessed its last execution.  Former Law School Dean Jerry Uelmen will teach the fourth class with a focus on whether current laws that address illegal drugs really make sense.  The final of the five classes will deal with legislating death.  Professor Michelle Oberman will provide a perspective on this sobering, but increasingly important topic.   

    Instructor: Jack Callon, a member of the OLLI@SCU Curriculum Committee, will serve as moderator for this five part series.

    Margaret Russell (February 11) has been a member of the School of Law faculty since 1990.  Prior to joining the SCU faculty, she was a fellow at the public interest law firm Public Advocates, Inc. in San Francisco.  Her undergraduate degree was from Princeton in 1979, and her law degree from Stanford in 1984.
    Lynette Parker (February 18) has been teaching and supervising law students handling immigration cases at the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center since 2000.  Prior to coming to Santa Clara, she worked as a staff attorney at the International Institute of the East Bay for 10 years. She has extensive experience representing asylum applicants, as well as battered spouses and children who are self-petitioning for permanent residence, victims of crimes and victims of human trafficking.
    Ellen Kreitzberg (February 25)joined the School of Law in 1988.  Prior to that, she was a trial attorney for the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C.  Her law degree is from George Washington University, and her undergraduate degree is from the University of Pennsylvania.
    Jerry Uelmen (March 4)served as Dean of the Santa Clara School of Law from 1986 to 1994.  In 1994-95, he was part of the defense team for the trials of O.J. Simpson.  He has served as President of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, California Academy of Appellate Lawyers, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association Law Foundation.  In 2008, he returned to full time teaching at the Santa Clara School of Law.
    Michelle Oberman (March 11)joined the School of Law faculty in 2004.  She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan in 1988, and her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1983.

    Long Course, Other Dates: February 11, 18, 25 and March 4, 11 

     

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
Fusion: Santa Clara University Choirs and Orchestra
  • Friday, Jun 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The final concert of the year is a collaboration between the Santa Clara University choirs and orchestras. The evening’s program is eclectic and features selections from Mozart’sVespers.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
General Registration for Spring Semester 2015
Geology of the National Parks of the West
  • Friday, Jan 16, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 23, 30 and February 6

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Friday, Jan 23, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 23, 30 and February 6

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Friday, Jan 30, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 23, 30 and February 6

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Friday, Feb 6, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The National Parks contain some of the most spectacular scenery on Earth, and the foundation for that scenery is the underlying geology. We will focus on parks of the west as we attempt to understand the processes, rocks, and landforms responsible for their great beauty. Understanding enhances the aesthetic appreciation of these features; and we will explore all the major landform environments, so that you may better enjoy these sites. We will explore parks that feature magnificent panoramas and secluded vistas, glacial terrain and river gorges, sand dunes and volcanoes, coastal settings and deserts. Most of the National Parks are located in the Western United States, and so we will likely cover those you will be most interested in, and are most easily accessible.    

    Instructor: Ray Pestrong is presently an Emeritus Professor of Geology at San Francisco State University.  He received his PhD in geology from Stanford, and has co-authored two texts and written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines.  Dr. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes.  He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education.  A popular OLLI@SCU instructor, he will accompany the Life Long Learning through Travel with OLLI @ SCU “Classical Splendors of Western Turkey” trip in June 2015.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 16, 23, 30 and February 6

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Gerald McKevitt, S.J. Lecture: Restoration and Relapse: Jesuit Education in the U.S., 1814-1900
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 at 7:00 PM

    The presentation, entitled "Restoration and Relapse, Jesuit Education in the U.S., 1814-1800," will explore the challenges entailed in the restoration of the Society of Jesus in 1814 and the subsequent success enjoyed by the Jesuits, mostly European immigrants, in establishing colleges across the United States. We will examine the central features of the Jesuit educational network, why it thrived in nineteenth-century America, and the serious challenges posed to that system by American higher education at large in the early twentieth century.

    Professor Gerald McKevitt, S.J. is the author of Brokers of Culture: Italian Jesuits in the American West 1848-1919, published in 2007 by Stanford University Press. He is an expert on Jesuits in the western United States. He has written about Christopher Columbus, Jesuit higher education, 19th century Native Americans, and the history of Santa Clara University. He earned his doctorate from UCLA, his master's from the University of Southern California, a BTS degree from Pontifical Gregorian University, and a bachelor's degree from the University of San Francisco.


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
Good Friday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
GTU Administrative Holiday
Guadalupe Celebration
  • Sunday, Dec 7, 2014 at 2:00 PM

    We invite you and your families to the 18th Annual Presentation of "La Virgen del Tepeyac."  This year's presentation will integrate the realities of the border children. All are invited to be a part of the celebration in drama, dance, and song that tells the story of  the apparitions of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The wonderful re-enactment is made possible through the collaboration of Teatro Corazon of Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish and Santa Clara University Students. The performance will be in Spanish with English commentary throughout.

    Event is free and open to the public.

    For more information, contact Dr. Ana Maria Pineda, RSM (408) 554-6958 or Rosa Guerra-Sarabia (408) 554-5011. In compliance with thte ADA/504, direct your accommodation requests to the Mission Church at (408) 554-4203.


    Location: Mission Church
Hawai'i Job Search Workshop & Networking Event
  • Wednesday, Dec 17, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

     

    SCU Career Counselor, Jon Sakurai-Horita is coming your way for a job search presentation and career networking reception on December 17th! No matter where you are in your career journey, this event is for you. John will touch on Resume writing, interview techniques, job search strategies and networking tips.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $15 per person
    Location:
         Haleakala-Kilauea Room
Holiday Dinner
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Join us for our annual Holiday Dinner.

    Date:  Monday, November 24, 2014 

    Time: 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
     
    Location: CA Mission Room, Benson Memorial Center
     
    Event:  Dinner and Entertainment
     
    Cost:  $45
      
    Dinner will be preceded by a social gathering. The dinner will take place in the beautiful California Mission Room, located in Benson Memorial Center, and is always a sell-out.

     


    Cost: 45.00
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
         Benson Memorial Center
HUB closes
HUB closure (Thanksgiving Holiday)
Ignatian Leadership Symposium
Independence Day: Administrative holiday/Library Closed
Indonesian Immersion
Indonesian Immersion
International Student & Scholar Update
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 at 12:00 PM

     Discussion of ongoing trends at SCU related to International Students & Scholars.  Food will be served, please contact hbodey@scu.edu with any questions.


    Location:
         Benson Williman Room
International Student & Scholar Update
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

     Discussion of ongoing trends at SCU related to International Students & Scholars.  Food will be served, please contact hbodey@scu.edu with any questions.


    Location:
         Williman Room Benson
Intersession 2015 Begins
Intersession 2015 Ends
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
J-1 Thanksgiving Social
Jazz Band/Combo Concert
  • Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band and Combo present concerts throughout the academic year. These exciting programs feature music in the American jazz tradition from the bright energy of the Big Band era all the way forward to the jazz music of today. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
JST Admissions Visit: 2014 Faith Formation Conference
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 to Saturday, Nov 22, 2014

    JST Admissions @ the 2014 Faith Formation Conference:

    November 21-22, 2014
    2014 Faith Formation Conference
    Exhibit Hall
    Santa Clara Convention Center
    Santa Clara, CA
     
    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Santa Clara!

     


    Location:
         Santa Clara Convention Center
JST Admissions Visit: Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
  • Friday, Mar 13, 2015 to Sunday, Mar 15, 2015

    JST Admissions at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress:

    March 13-15, 2015
    Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
    Exhibit Hall
    Anaheim Convention Center
    Anaheim, California

    Email or call for an appointment to meet wtih us while we are in Anaheim!


    Location:
         Anaheim Convention Center
JST Baccalaureate Liturgy
JST Commencement Ceremony
Language, Thought, Culture: A Reanalysis
  • Thursday, Jan 8, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, Jan 15, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, Jan 22, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If Eskimos have several words for snow, do they perceive it differently from us? Are the Piraha, a tribe in the Amazon rainforest whose language lacks number words, not able to keep track of exact quantities? And do speakers of Australian aboriginal languages, who say north, south, east, and west rather than left and right, have better spatial orientation than English speakers? In short, does our language affect how we think and perceive the world? Or are there universal aspects of human language and cognition that transcend linguistic divisions?
     

    In this course, we will discuss some of the most hotly debated and fundamental issues concerning language and thought; examine important theories of language and its relationship to thought and culture (such as the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis and Noam Chomsky’s parametric theory of language); and scrutinize current research on both culture-specific and universal aspects of human languages. We will read and discuss Guy Deutcher's Through the Language Glass, which claims that "different languages can lead their speakers to different thoughts" and John McWhorter's The Language Hoax, which argues that the idea that "the language we speak shapes the way we perceive the world" is plainly wrong. Our overarching goal is to gain a better understanding of human nature through what the philosopher Leibniz called “the best mirror of the human mind”—our language. 

    Instructor: Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012.  Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program; and this course is an updated and revised version of a course she taught several years ago.

    Long Course, Other Dates: January 8, 15, 22, 29 and February 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: O'Connor Room 106 (January 8)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (Januay 15, 22, 29 and February 5)
     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
Late Registration Spring Semester 2015
Level 1- Gottman Couples Therapy: Bridging the Couples Chasm, A New Research-Based Approach
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Mar 7, 2015 at 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x274 Level 1- Gottman Couples Therapy

    DATE: March 6th & 7th 

    TIME: 9-4:30PM (lunch provided) Both days

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 137

    WORKSHOP FEE: $360

    **PLEASE NOTE** Additional Costs for this Course: 300-page Gottman Clinical Manual: $85
    The price of this mandatory manual is not included in the course registration price; students will be required to buy one of these manuals with cash or check or credit card the day of the course. Please contact us if you have any questions.

    Register for WInter »

     

     

     

     

    Course Objectives:

    • Name the four negative interactions predictive if divorce.
    • Describe the three components of relationship functioning in the Sound Relationship House Theory.
    • Describe three interventions in Gottman Method Therapy to strengthen the couples friendship system.
    • Describe and explain the Dream Within Conflict intervention to help couples manage a perpetual gridlocked problem. 

    Course Description:

           When couples enter the therapy office, they sting with pain and despair. They look to the clinician to referee chronic conflicts, fix their partners, and rebuild burned bridges. Now, based on Dr. John Gottman's 40 years of compelling research with over 3,000 couples, there's a practical and highly effective approach to guiding these couples across the chasm that divides them. In this workshop, Dr. Navarra provides clinicians with proven, research-based roadmap for helping couples to compassionately manage their conflicts, deepen their friendship and intimacy, and share their life purpose and dreams.  

           This inspirational two-day workshop focuses on 1) understanding couples' struggles using new research-based assessments and effective interventions,  2) empirically supported strategies and tools to help couples successfully manage conflict, 3) skills that empower couples to dialogue about their worst gridlocked issues by uncovering their underlying dreams, history, and values, 4) Methods to help couples process their fights and heal their hurts and 5) techniques for couples to deepen their intimacy and minimize relapse
     
            You’ll receive a 300-page Clinical Manual featuring new relationship assessment questionnaires and clinical interventions that you’ll be able to use immediately with your clients.

           Clinicians who take this workshop will be equipped with new methods and tools to help couples break the cycle of criticism, defensiveness, contempt and stonewalling. Through demonstrations and films from the clinical office, you'll see how to apply the research-based principles and interventions of Gottman Method Couples Therapy to strengthen the Friendship System - the building block for intimacy, passion, and good sex; the Conflict System - the basis for helping couples manage solvable problems and understand and manage irresolvable differences and the Shared Meaning System - the existential foundation of the relationship that helps couples create shared purpose in building a life together.
     

           Instructor:

    Bob Navarra, Psy.D., M.F.T., trained with Drs. John and Julie Gottman and is Certified by the Gottman Institute to teach Level 1; Level II: Assessment, Intervention, and Comorbidities; and the Art & Science of Love: A Weekend Workshop for Couples. Dr. Navarra and Dr. Gottman recently co-authored a chapter titled Gottman Method Therapy: From Theory to Practice, in Case Studies in Couple Therapy: Theory-Based Approaches (2011).  He has also written extensively and published in the areas of alcoholism and drug addiction co-Morbidity. Dr. Navarra is a Research Scientist at the Gottman Relationship Research Institute and Research Associate at Mental Research Institute, where he co-founded the Center for Couples. He has presented his original research at conferences for AAMFT, CAMFT, and the Gottman Institute.

    This is a two day event - 11/14/14 - 9am-4:30pm & 11/15/14 - 9am-4:30pm


    Cost: 360 (+ $85 day of course)
    Location: Loyola Hall
Literary Cuisine: A Tribute to Maya Angelou
Looking Back After 150 Years: The American Civil War
  • Tuesday, Jan 6, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Tuesday, Jan 13, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
  • Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    The American Civil War was one of the most important events in the history of our country. Yet its origin and significance have been debated from the time the war began until the present day. Even its proper name—“Civil War, “ “The War Between the States,” or “The War of Northern Aggression”-- has been and continues to be the subject of controversy.

    Instructor: Robert Senkewicz is a Professor in SCU’s  History Department and former Director of the OLLI@SCU program.. He received a B.A. at Fordham University and his M.A. and Ph.D. at Stanford University.   He has written many books, including::Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women; and Lands of Promise and Despair: Chronicles of Early California.  He has also written articles and essays for numerous publications.  

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 6, 13, 20, 27 and February 3

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand room 102 (January 6, 27, February 3)
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A room B & C (January 13, 20) 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Room 102
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles President's Club Dinner
  • Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Michael E. Engh, S.J., President of Santa Clara University cordially invites you to the Los Angeles President’s Club Dinner honoring members of the President’s Club and the 37th Annual Santa Claran of the Year award recipient(s) (still to be named).  


    Location:
         The California Club
Los Angeles SCU vs. LMU Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM

     

    Root for our men's basketball team with fellow alumni as they take on the LMU Lions! Coaching staff will provide a Chalk Talk at the reception. Don't forget to wear your Bronco red!

    Check back for RSVP information soon...


    Cost: $20 per person
    Location:
         Loyola Marymount University
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
MBA / MS Info Sessions
MBA/MS Spring 2015 Deadline
Memorial Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Men, Women and Travel: Tourism in Europe Since the Renaissance
  • Friday, Feb 13, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Feb 27, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course offers an overview of the nature of tourism and its practice, from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the period from the middle of the 17th century, with the development of the terms “tourism,” “picturesque,” and “romantic.”  A focus will be on similarities and differences in the experiences of man and women travelers through the many changes into the 21th century, when women travel in ever larger numbers and, for the first time, apply for more American passports than men do.

    Instructor: Bert Gordon, a professor of history at Mills College, is a specialist in World War II France.  His books focus on French collaboration with Nazi Germany during the war.  As a part of his research, he interviewed dozens of French participants, including volunteers with the German Waffen-SS and high-ranking members of the Vichy government.  He has also written about popular foods, notably the history of the hamburger, as well as chapters on chocolate history in England, France, California, and China in Chocolate: History, Culture, and Heritage (New York: John Wiley, 2009). Tourism throughout history is another area in which Bert has done extensive research.  He is currently writing a book on France and wartime tourism.  Bert is one of OLLI’s most popular instructors.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 13, 20, 27 and March 6

    Location: Loyola Hall, Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Modern Architecture: From Europe to America
  • Saturday, Feb 21, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    When and why was Modern Architecture started? How was Modernism different in Europe than in America?  What role did California Modernism play in relation to the world scene?  And, even more specifically, what was the contribution of the Bay Area to the culture of Modernism in architecture? These are the central questions that this course will address with rarely seen material.  No previous knowledge of architecture is required.

    Instructor: Pierluigi Serraino is an architect, author, and educator.  He holds multiple professional and research degrees in architecture from Italy and the United States.  Prior to opening his independent design practice, he worked at Mark Mack Architects; Skidmore Owings, & Merrill; and Anshen + Allen, working on a variety of residential and institutional projects in the U.S. and overseas.  His work and writing have been published in professional and scholarly journals, among them Architectural Record and Journal of Architectural Education.  He has authored four books, including Modernism Rediscovered.  He has lectured widely on the subjects of mid-century modern, architectural photography, and digital design.  Projects under construction are in Berkeley and Alameda.  Forthcoming publications are The Creative Architect: The Great Lost Study of 1958 at UC Berkeley (2015)and, with Alan Hess, History of California Modernism (2016).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 21, 28

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

     


    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    When and why was Modern Architecture started? How was Modernism different in Europe than in America?  What role did California Modernism play in relation to the world scene?  And, even more specifically, what was the contribution of the Bay Area to the culture of Modernism in architecture? These are the central questions that this course will address with rarely seen material.  No previous knowledge of architecture is required.

    Instructor: Pierluigi Serraino is an architect, author, and educator.  He holds multiple professional and research degrees in architecture from Italy and the United States.  Prior to opening his independent design practice, he worked at Mark Mack Architects; Skidmore Owings, & Merrill; and Anshen + Allen, working on a variety of residential and institutional projects in the U.S. and overseas.  His work and writing have been published in professional and scholarly journals, among them Architectural Record and Journal of Architectural Education.  He has authored four books, including Modernism Rediscovered.  He has lectured widely on the subjects of mid-century modern, architectural photography, and digital design.  Projects under construction are in Berkeley and Alameda.  Forthcoming publications are The Creative Architect: The Great Lost Study of 1958 at UC Berkeley (2015)and, with Alan Hess, History of California Modernism (2016).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 21, 28

    Location: Vari Hall, Wiegand Room 102

     


    Cost: 65.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Wiegand Room 102
Monterey/Salinas 11th Annual Dinner
MSE-GI Application Deadline
MSF Application Deadline
MSF Application Deadline Early Decision
Nancy Wait-Kromm - Soprano Voice
New Music Festival
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM to Friday, Jan 30, 2015

    The 2015 New Music Festival at Santa Clara University will celebrate the life and work of Alvin Lucier, American composer and pioneer of experimental music and sound installations. The Festival comprises three days of concerts, lectures, and workshops with the presence of the composer himself.

    Lucier has been a pioneer in many areas of music composition and performance, including the notation of performer's physical gestures, the use of brain waves in live performance, and the evocation of room acoustics for musical purposes.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
New York Chapter All-Jesuit Young Alumni Happy Hour and Pajama Drive
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Celebrate the season and mix and mingle with local young alumni from other Jesuit schools. Hors d'oeuvres will be served.

    In the spirit of the season, we will once again be partnering with the Pajama Program, founded by Fordham alumna Genevieve Piturro, FCRH '86, to host a pajama drive for homeless children. The first 100 attendees to arrive with new pajama donations will receive a free drink ticket.

    Come and enjoy a festive happy hour with fellow alumni and help make this season a warmer one for the city's underprivileged children.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $10 per person
    Location:
         Stout
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Palm Springs Mass & Brunch with University President, Michael Engh, S.J.
  • Sunday, Feb 8, 2015 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

     Michael E. Engh, S.J. preferred

    Mark your calendars, Broncos!  Father Engh will be visiting our Palm Springs Chapter for Mass and brunch on Sunday, February 8.  You won't want to miss this chance to hear about the latest happenings at SCU!

     

Pasta Feed and Bronco Legends Celebration
Pastel Workshop (Studio Course)
  • Friday, Jan 9, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This 3-session studio workshop will provide an overview of pastel technique, and the opportunity to explore still- life, botanical, and plein air sketching in the SCU Mission Gardens.  Students with various levels of experience with pastel, including beginners, are encouraged to attend.  This course is offered as part of a special partnership with the studio art program in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.   

    Instructor: Julie Hughes is an installation artist and painter.  A full-time Lecturer in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History, she currently teaches all levels of drawing, painting, and two-dimensional design.  Julie has exhibited her work throughout the country, including a public art installation for the Los Angeles International Airport.  She received her M.F.A. in Painting from California State University, Northridge.  This is Julie’s first course for SCU Osher.

    Special Note: Because this is a studio course, class enrollment is limited to 15.  All materials and supplies will be provided by the Department of Art and Art History.  Because of the nature and location of the class, this course may not be suitable for those with some physical limitations.

    Short Course, Other Dates: January 9, 16, 23

    Location: Fine Arts Building, Room C

     


    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room C
  • Friday, Jan 16, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This 3-session studio workshop will provide an overview of pastel technique, and the opportunity to explore still- life, botanical, and plein air sketching in the SCU Mission Gardens.  Students with various levels of experience with pastel, including beginners, are encouraged to attend.  This course is offered as part of a special partnership with the studio art program in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.   

    Instructor: Julie Hughes is an installation artist and painter.  A full-time Lecturer in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History, she currently teaches all levels of drawing, painting, and two-dimensional design.  Julie has exhibited her work throughout the country, including a public art installation for the Los Angeles International Airport.  She received her M.F.A. in Painting from California State University, Northridge.  This is Julie’s first course for SCU Osher.

    Special Note: Because this is a studio course, class enrollment is limited to 15.  All materials and supplies will be provided by the Department of Art and Art History.  Because of the nature and location of the class, this course may not be suitable for those with some physical limitations.

    Short Course, Other Dates: January 9, 16, 23

    Location: Fine Arts Building, Room C

     


    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room C
  • Friday, Jan 23, 2015 from 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This 3-session studio workshop will provide an overview of pastel technique, and the opportunity to explore still- life, botanical, and plein air sketching in the SCU Mission Gardens.  Students with various levels of experience with pastel, including beginners, are encouraged to attend.  This course is offered as part of a special partnership with the studio art program in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History.   

    Instructor: Julie Hughes is an installation artist and painter.  A full-time Lecturer in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History, she currently teaches all levels of drawing, painting, and two-dimensional design.  Julie has exhibited her work throughout the country, including a public art installation for the Los Angeles International Airport.  She received her M.F.A. in Painting from California State University, Northridge.  This is Julie’s first course for SCU Osher.

    Special Note: Because this is a studio course, class enrollment is limited to 15.  All materials and supplies will be provided by the Department of Art and Art History.  Because of the nature and location of the class, this course may not be suitable for those with some physical limitations.

    Short Course, Other Dates: January 9, 16, 23

    Location: Fine Arts Building, Room C

     


    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Room C
Presidents' Day Holiday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Rebellion vs. Conformity in Contemporary American Short Stories
  • Tuesday, Jan 13, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    In this course, we will read and discuss four finely crafted and thought-provoking short stories by 20th century American writers who explore the tensions between conforming to social, cultural, or familial norms and expectations and rebelling against or rejecting them. These texts will give us the opportunity to explore the diversity of styles, voices, experiences, and perspectives that have shaped, and are continually reshaping, American fiction.
    In the first class, we'll read and discuss John Updike’s story “A & P,” a tale of adolescent identity and rebellion, and Amy Tan’s “Two Kinds,” a tale of childhood rebellion against, and possible reconciliation with, a parent. In the second class session, we’ll read Kurt Vonnegut’s “Harrison Bergeron,” a science fiction story about rebellion in a futuristic dystopian society, and Alice Walker’s “Elethia,” a tale of rebellion in the context of the Civil Rights movement.

    It will be the responsibility of class members to secure their own copies of these short stories, prior to class discussions. Due to both copyright and cost issues, Osher will not copy and distribute them.  Class members, upon enrollment, will be sent an email that provides instructions on accessing, downloading, and printing these stories using the University’s electronic reserve system.  Otherwise, these stories are available separately, or in collections, at public libraries, bookstores, or on amazon.com.

    Instructor: Marilyn Edelstein is an Associate Professor of English at Santa Clara University, where she has been teaching since 1987. She also teaches in SCU's Women's and Gender Studies Program. Her teaching and scholarship focus on 20th and 21st century American literature, feminist theory, multicultural literature, and literature and ethics. She has been teaching Osher Lifelong Learning courses regularly since 2007 and is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  January 13, 20

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
  • Tuesday, Jan 20, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    In this course, we will read and discuss four finely crafted and thought-provoking short stories by 20th century American writers who explore the tensions between conforming to social, cultural, or familial norms and expectations and rebelling against or rejecting them. These texts will give us the opportunity to explore the diversity of styles, voices, experiences, and perspectives that have shaped, and are continually reshaping, American fiction.
    In the first class, we'll read and discuss John Updike’s story “A & P,” a tale of adolescent identity and rebellion, and Amy Tan’s “Two Kinds,” a tale of childhood rebellion against, and possible reconciliation with, a parent. In the second class session, we’ll read Kurt Vonnegut’s “Harrison Bergeron,” a science fiction story about rebellion in a futuristic dystopian society, and Alice Walker’s “Elethia,” a tale of rebellion in the context of the Civil Rights movement.

    It will be the responsibility of class members to secure their own copies of these short stories, prior to class discussions. Due to both copyright and cost issues, Osher will not copy and distribute them.  Class members, upon enrollment, will be sent an email that provides instructions on accessing, downloading, and printing these stories using the University’s electronic reserve system.  Otherwise, these stories are available separately, or in collections, at public libraries, bookstores, or on amazon.com.

    Instructor: Marilyn Edelstein is an Associate Professor of English at Santa Clara University, where she has been teaching since 1987. She also teaches in SCU's Women's and Gender Studies Program. Her teaching and scholarship focus on 20th and 21st century American literature, feminist theory, multicultural literature, and literature and ethics. She has been teaching Osher Lifelong Learning courses regularly since 2007 and is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.

    Short Course, Other Dates:  January 13, 20

    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C 

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Bannan Hall
         Room 142
Rush Hour Concert - Alex Christie
Rush Hour Concert - Kristen Strom
Rush Hour Concert - SCLOrk
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 5:30 PM

     Enjoy 50 minutes of music from our Laptop Orchestra (SCLOrk) and and then breeze through your commute!


    Cost: free
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Russia Beyond the Russians: The Who, Where, and Why of Current Events
  • Wednesday, Dec 3, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Russia Beyond the Russians: The Who, Where, and Why of Current Events (Second Session)
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Sacramento Annual St. Patrick's Day Luncheon with USF & St. Mary's
Sacramento Chapter Annual Christmas Reception
  • Wednesday, Dec 10, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    Celebrate the season with fellow Broncos over holiday food and drink. In the spirit of the holiday season, we encourage attendees to bring canned food items as a donation toward the Sacramento Loaves & Fishes Food Drive.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $30 per person
    Location:
         At the Home of Susan Bitar, Class of 1991
San Diego SCU vs. USD Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
  • Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 9:30 PM

     New Student Calling

    Join fellow alumni as our Broncos take on the University of San Diego Toreros. Prior to the game, enjoy appetizers, beverages, and a "Chalk Talk" featuring a men's basketball coach with some insight into the game. Be sure to wear your Bronco red! 

    Check back for RSVP information soon...


    Cost: $20 per person
    Location:
         University of San Diego
San Francisco AFO- Serving Meals at St. Anthony's Dining Room
San Francisco Economic Forecast
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Home Safe Holiday Party
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Pizza and Basketball with Nativity students
SCU Basketball Game at Gonzaga
  • Saturday, Jan 10, 2015

     Join fellow Broncos support our Men's Basketball Team take on Gonzaga!


    Location:
         Spokane, WA
SCU Basketball Game at Portland
  • Thursday, Jan 8, 2015

     Come join fellow Broncos support our men's Basketball team as they take on Portland.


    Location:
         Portland, Or.
SCU Basketball Game at USF
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015

     Come join fellow Broncos support our Men's Basketball team take on USF in San Francisco.


    Location:
         San Francisco, CA
Seattle Young Alumni Brewery Tour
  • Saturday, Dec 13, 2014 from 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM

    Join fellow Broncos as we travel through the greater Seattle area in search for the best brewery and learn about the brewing process. Our first stop will be Everett-based Scuttlebutt Brewery, the only brewery in Washington owned by a SCU grad! Following our VIP tour at Scuttlebutt, we will head to Fremont and Outlander Brewing.

    Included in the tour is transportation, beer tasting, and a commemorative glass. A no-host lunch will take place during the day.

    Spots are limited, so RSVP today!

     


    Cost: $30
    Location:
         Seattle Area
Slavery in America, 1600-1861
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Song and Dance Men of the Silver Screen
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Feb 23, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Mar 2, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
  • Monday, Mar 9, 2015 from 1:30 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Ray Bolger, Donald O'Connor, Bill (Bojangles) Robinson--has the silver screen ever seen greater dancers?  Join popular Osher instructor Bonnie Weiss for her latest course and learn about the fascinating lives of the marvelous men of the movie musical genre, who have enchanted us with their fabulous feet and their way with a song.  A highlight of the course will be rare footage of these beloved entertainers,  from their early careers through the heights of their stardom.

    Instructor: Bonnie Weiss, M.A. is a seasoned theatre educator, writer and professional speaker.  She teaches musical theatre appreciation for the OLLI programs at San Francisco State University and Dominican University, as well as SCU, and also for retirement communities, elder hostels and professional groups throughout California.  She has taught at the San.Francisco Conservatory of Music, U.C. Berkeley Extension and the Colleges of Marin and San Mateo.  She writes for The Sondheim Review and Stage Directions.  She has also co-produced, directed, and written dialogue for 12 sold-out cabaret shows and 3 radio programs.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 9, 23 and March 2, 9

    Location: Learning Commons, Library Viewing and Taping Room A 

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Spring 2015 Recess
Spring Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Spring Semester 2015 Begins
Spring Semester 2015 Ends
Start Up Expo
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Sunday Morning Liturgy
Tavola Italiana - Italian Conversation
  • Wednesday, Dec 3, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
Teresa McCollough - Piano
Thanksgiving Holiday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
The War in the Pacific: The U.S. Versus Japan
  • Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Mar 3, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Tuesday, Mar 10, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    On December 7, 1941 the Japanese attacked the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, initiating some three and half years of brutal warfare in the Pacific.  This course will examine why the Japanese made the fateful decision to challenge a far richer and much more powerful nation.  It will also cover the course of the war, which began with a series of spectacular Japanese successes, but soon brought a series of naval and military disasters, capped by the dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945.  

    Instructor: E. Bruce Reynolds, Professor of History at San Jose State University, has taught East Asian history and the history of World War II for many years.  He is the author of Thailand and Japan's Southern Advance, 1940-1945 and Thailand's Secret War: OSS, SOE, and the Free Thai Underground during World War II.  He also edited and contributed to Japan in the Fascist Era.  He has also become a very popular Osher instructor.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  February 10, 17, 24 and March 3, 10

    Location: Benson Center, Parlors B & C

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
Theatre Behind the Scenes: A Moon for the Misbegotten
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
     
    A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O’Neill, is a sequel  to his  Long Day’s Journey into Night. It deals with themes of finding peace through human kinship rather than the whisky bottle, forgiveness and self-forgiveness.  It had its world premiere in Columbus, Ohio in 1947.  The play has been produced five times on Broadway, starting May 2, 1957.  It also was a television production, garnering five Emmy nominations and winning one.  Between October 13 and November 13, 2013, it was produced for the first time in Low German in Hamburg.  The role of James Tyrone, the play’s hero, is said to be based on Eugene O’Neill’s older brother, Jamie O’Neill.  This offering includes a pre-production class, tickets for the Sunday matinee production, and a post-production discussion.  Information about SCU’s play production and a tour of the theater is included. 

    Instructor: Frederick Tollini, S.J., has been at Santa Clara University since 1971, and has taught in the English and Theatre & Dance Departments (Chair 1980-93), specializing in Drama and Theater History, Shakespeare Studies and directing plays.  He holds a doctorate in Theater History from Yale University and has published three books:  Performance and Culture I-II  (American Heritage Press, 1995); Scene Design at the Court of Louis XIV (Edwin Mellon Press, 2003); and The Shakespeare Productions of Max Reinhardt (Edwin Mellon Press, 2004).  A fourth work, The Art of Variation in the Scene Designs of Donald Oenslager, is obtainable directly from the Mellon Press.  Fr. Tollini has directed over fifty plays and musicals, and acted in productions both at Santa Clara and in regional theater.  His musical background at Santa Clara includes founding the Bronco Philharmonic, predecessor to the current university symphony orchestra.  He is a Past President of the California Educational Theater Association (CETA).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  Class: February 28

                                                    Performance: March 1 

    Location: Class: Benson Center, Parlors B & C
                     Performance: Louis B. Mayer Theatre 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
  • Sunday, Mar 1, 2015 at 2:00 PM

    Register Here

    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
     
    A Moon for the Misbegotten by Eugene O’Neill, is a sequel  to his  Long Day’s Journey into Night. It deals with themes of finding peace through human kinship rather than the whisky bottle, forgiveness and self-forgiveness.  It had its world premiere in Columbus, Ohio in 1947.  The play has been produced five times on Broadway, starting May 2, 1957.  It also was a television production, garnering five Emmy nominations and winning one.  Between October 13 and November 13, 2013, it was produced for the first time in Low German in Hamburg.  The role of James Tyrone, the play’s hero, is said to be based on Eugene O’Neill’s older brother, Jamie O’Neill.  This offering includes a pre-production class, tickets for the Sunday matinee production, and a post-production discussion.  Information about SCU’s play production and a tour of the theater is included. 

    Instructor: Frederick Tollini, S.J., has been at Santa Clara University since 1971, and has taught in the English and Theatre & Dance Departments (Chair 1980-93), specializing in Drama and Theater History, Shakespeare Studies and directing plays.  He holds a doctorate in Theater History from Yale University and has published three books:  Performance and Culture I-II  (American Heritage Press, 1995); Scene Design at the Court of Louis XIV (Edwin Mellon Press, 2003); and The Shakespeare Productions of Max Reinhardt (Edwin Mellon Press, 2004).  A fourth work, The Art of Variation in the Scene Designs of Donald Oenslager, is obtainable directly from the Mellon Press.  Fr. Tollini has directed over fifty plays and musicals, and acted in productions both at Santa Clara and in regional theater.  His musical background at Santa Clara includes founding the Bronco Philharmonic, predecessor to the current university symphony orchestra.  He is a Past President of the California Educational Theater Association (CETA).

    Short Course, Other Dates:  Class: February 28

                                                    Performance: March 1 

    Location: Class: Benson Center, Parlors B & C
                     Performance: Louis B. Mayer Theatre 

    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         Parlors B & C
What Does a Conductor Do?
  • Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    You see them waving their arms and taking credit for the great performance an ensemble just gave, but what does a conductor actually do? The job of a conductor is complex and multifaceted, but often difficult to fully understand from the audience's perspective. If you've ever wondered what it takes to stand in front of a symphony orchestra or choir, and to take charge of the music they make, this class will reveal some of the mysteries. Participants will learn the basics of conducting gesture including patterns, cuing, and cut-offs, and take a behind the scenes tour of the preparatory work of a conductor. While years of formal music training are required to be a conductor, for this course all that is required is an appreciation of music and a willingness to try new things.  

    Instructor: Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire. Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling; the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch; the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus; and the Maryland Opera Studio. Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival. Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 17, 24

    Location: Benson Center, Room 21  

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center
         Room 21
  • Tuesday, Feb 24, 2015 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    You see them waving their arms and taking credit for the great performance an ensemble just gave, but what does a conductor actually do? The job of a conductor is complex and multifaceted, but often difficult to fully understand from the audience's perspective. If you've ever wondered what it takes to stand in front of a symphony orchestra or choir, and to take charge of the music they make, this class will reveal some of the mysteries. Participants will learn the basics of conducting gesture including patterns, cuing, and cut-offs, and take a behind the scenes tour of the preparatory work of a conductor. While years of formal music training are required to be a conductor, for this course all that is required is an appreciation of music and a willingness to try new things.  

    Instructor: Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. As a conductor, singer, pianist, and teacher, he is known for his insatiable desire for excellence and deep connection to the personal joy of music making.  Equally at home in front of choral and orchestral forces, he has lead a great variety of ensembles in a vast array of repertoire. Hanna-Weir has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Helmuth Rilling; the National Orchestral Institute under Maestro Asher Fisch; the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus; and the Maryland Opera Studio. Most recently, he assisted in the premiere of Matthew Halls' own reconstruction of the Bach St. Mark Passion at the Oregon Bach Festival. Hanna-Weir previously served as director of the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC and as director of the vocal music program at Tecumseh High School in Tecumseh, MI. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  February 17, 24

    Location: Benson Center, Room 21  

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Benson Center
         Room 21
Where Is the United States Economy Going: Stagnation or Growth?
  • Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Loyola Hall 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Loyola Hall 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Loyola Hall 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Loyola Hall 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    This class will review the performance of the U.S. economy over the recent past, especially the financial crisis of 2007-8 and associated recession, and then look at the "big picture" for future growth.  Many economists are concerned about the negative effects of growing inequality, rapid technological change, and continued globalization. Are these serious and different threats to the well-being of the average American?  Come explore the issues!

    Instructor: Michael Kevane is Associate Professor in the Economics Department at Santa Clara University.  Recent research focuses on the importance of libraries in promoting reading and the impacts on societies of a reading public, with particular reference to West Africa.  He is the author of Women and Development in Africa: How Gender Works (Lynne Rienner, 2004).  He is past President of the Sudan Studies Association, and co-director of Friends of African Village Libraries (www.favl.org), a non-profit he co-founded in 2001, that has established numerous village libraries in rural Africa.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    Location: Loyola Hall 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Wind Symphony presents concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Winter Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni.


    Location: Locatelli Center
Zora Neale Hurston & the Harlem Renaissance: Folklore, Gender & the Black Vernacular
  • Wednesday, Jan 7, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
  • Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    The Harlem Renaissance (1919-1938), was a moment when artists and writers in the African diaspora, congregating in New York City’s Harlem, sought to build upon and redefine black America.  This course aims to give participants a general introduction to the history, culture, music, and politics of this movement, as well as an intensive introduction to critical reading.  You will be asked to reflect not just on what a written or visual text means, but on how it makes its meaning.  Focusing on anthropologist and writer, Zora Neale Hurston, this course introduces students to the issues of gender, folklore, and the black vernacular (language, dialect, voice, and the relationship among them) by critically reading Hurston’s essays, ethnographic pieces, and short stories, alongside her renowned novel Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937). 

    Instructor: Christine Montgomery is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at Santa Clara University. She earned her PhD in Literature at UC Santa Cruz.  Courses taught include: The Harlem Renaissance; Pan-African Literature; and Contemporary Black Women Writers. Her current book project, Anachronistic Prophecies: Arna Bontemps and Comparative Freedoms in Neo-Slave Narratives, investigates the slave archive, time, gender and the terrain of slavery. Material from this project is under review at MELUS.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4

    SPLIT ROOMS: 
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall Building A, Room B & C (January 14, 21, and February 4)
    Location: Vari Hall, Weigand Room 102 (January 7, 28)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall, Sobrato Hall A
         Room B & C
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If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please contact or 408-551-6068 two weeks prior to the event.

Jesuit Education at SCU

jesuit-education

Caring for the whole person.
An important principle of Jesuit education is care for the whole person. The Jesuit philosophy places a student's humanity first, creating a personalized educational environment where thoughtful questions can be considered.
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