Santa Clara University

current-students-130-rnd
 
 

New Cohorted Core Courses

ACTG 3100

Financial Reporting and Management Control

(Part 1 of 6 unit cohort course) This course focuses on issues and techniques relating to the gathering, presentation, and analysis of the financial information firms publicly report to the capital markets regarding firm position and performance. The course subsequently considers the use of this information, along with non-financial and proprietary information, in tactical and strategic decision processes designed to enhance stakeholder value for an organization.

ACTG 3102

Financial Reporting and Management Control

(Part 2 of 6 unit cohort course) This course focuses on issues and techniques relating to the gathering, presentation, and analysis of the financial information firms publicly report to the capital markets regarding firm position and performance. The course subsequently considers the use of this information, along with non-financial and proprietary information, in tactical and strategic decision processes designed to enhance stakeholder value for an organization.

Students who have completed ACTG 300 and ACTG 302 in the old curriculum have satisfied the ACTG 3100 and 3102 requirement. Students switching to the new curriculum who have only completed ACTG 300 must register for and complete ACTG 302 before Summer 2014 and are not eligible to register for ACTG 3102.

ECON 3400

Microeconomics & Macroeconomics in the Global Economy

(Part 1 of 6 unit cohort course) The first part of the course utilizes the tools of microeconomic theory to analyze and understand essential topics related to optimal business decisions. Topics include the characteristics of costs and demand and profit maximization pricing. Market structures are studied with a focus on differences and the concomitant consequences for business decisions. Students will understand the various market structures in the context of the global trade environment. Regression analysis is used to rigorously estimate costs and demand. The class utilizes many examples from the Silicon Valley to help integrate market theory and practice and provides a powerful analytical basis for the further study of business topics.

ECON 3402

Microeconomics & Macroeconomics in the Global Economy (6 units)

(Part 2 of 6 unit cohort course) Part two of the course is designed to help students better understand the macroeconomic environments - national and global - in which businesses, households, and governments operate - and why those environments change. Some of the questions addressed are: Why does an economy grow over time? What causes recessions and unemployment? Why do we have financial crises, and why are they potentially so damaging? Are government deficits detrimental or beneficial, and under what conditions? What determines changes in interest rates, the rate of inflation, and the foreign exchange rate, and what are the consequences of such changes?

Students who have completed ECON 401 and ECON 405 in the old curriculum have satisfied the ECON 3400 and 3402 requirement. Students switching to the new curriculum, who have only completed ECON 401 must register for and complete ECON 405 before Summer 2014 and are not eligible to register for ECON 3402.

MGMT 3500

Building and Leading High-Performance Teams and Organizations

(Part 1 of 6 unit cohort course) Leaders are successful when they build teams and organizations that can accomplish critical goals, adapt to changing conditions, and maintain the motivation and commitment of employees. Doing these things requires understanding how individuals’ characteristics affect their behaviors at work, how the dynamics of work teams are related to their performance, and how the technology, structure, and human resource systems of organizations influence performance. This course explores those general issues and addresses questions such as “What are the characteristics and behaviors of high performing managers?” “How does one build high performing cross-functional and cross- cultural teams?” “What is the ‘best’ way to structure an organization when rapid changes may be necessary?” and “What are the consequences—both intended and unintended— of systems (compensation plans, performance management systems, etc.), organization culture, and leaders’ actions on individual and organization performance?”

MGMT 3502

Building and Leading High-Performance Teams and Organizations(Part 2)

(Part 2 of 6 unit cohort course) Leaders are successful when they build teams and organizations that can accomplish critical goals, adapt to changing conditions, and maintain the motivation and commitment of employees. Doing these things requires understanding how individuals’ characteristics affect their behaviors at work, how the dynamics of work teams are related to their performance, and how the technology, structure, and human resource systems of organizations influence performance. This course explores those general issues and addresses questions such as “What are the characteristics and behaviors of high performing managers?” “How does one build high performing cross-functional and cross- cultural teams?” “What is the ‘best’ way to structure an organization when rapid changes may be necessary?” and “What are the consequences—both intended and unintended— of systems (compensation plans, performance management systems, etc.), organization culture, and leaders’ actions on individual and organization performance?”

Students who have completed MGMT 501 and MGMT 503 in the old curriculum have satisfied the MGMT 3500 and 3502 requirement. Students switching to the new curriculum, who have only completed MGMT 501 must register for and complete MGMT 503 before Summer 2014 and are not eligible to register for MGMT 3502.

OMIS 3350

Decision Making and Analysis

(Part 1 of 6 unit cohort course) The widespread use of the Internet and the increased power of computing resources have created new sources of data and new capabilities for analysis. More than ever, statistical methods and optimization techniques play a fundamental role in understanding consumer related data and incorporating it into business the decision making. This course will provide an integrated treatment of analytical methodologies applied to these important areas. Included is a discussion of basic probability theory including random variables and distributions, basic statistical theory including estimation and hypothesis testing, and both simple and multiple regression. These topics will be integrated with decision analysis and basic optimization including linear, integer, and non-linear methods. Examples will be drawn from modern applications of these methods.

OMIS 3352

Decision Making & Analysis

(Part 2 of 6 unit cohort course) The widespread use of the Internet and the increased power of computing resources have created new sources of data and new capabilities for analysis. More than ever, statistical methods and optimization techniques play a fundamental role in understanding consumer related data and incorporating it into business the decision making. This course will provide an integrated treatment of analytical methodologies applied to these important areas. Included is a discussion of basic probability theory including random variables and distributions, basic statistical theory including estimation and hypothesis testing, and both simple and multiple regression. These topics will be integrated with decision analysis and basic optimization including linear, integer, and non-linear methods. Examples will be drawn from modern applications of these methods.

Students who have completed OMIS 353 and OMIS 355 in the old curriculum have satisfied the OMIS 3350 and 3352 requirement. Students switching to the new curriculum, who have only completed OMIS 353 must register for and complete OMIS 355 before Summer 2014 and are not eligible to register for OMIS 3352.

New 3-unit Core Courses

MGMT 3504

Innovation in Silicon Valley

The course will cover the skills, practices and processes for understanding and managing technology and innovation in fast paced environments. The course delivery is informed by extant foundational and emerging empirical work in innovation. This course will complement content in elective courses (product marketing, product development, and intellectual property, small business entrepreneurship) and core courses in strategy.

Students who have taken MGMT 524 in the old curriculum are not eligible to take MGMT 3504 and vice versa. MGMT 3504 will satisfy the Managing Technology and Innovation concentration in the old curriculum and will serve as the required innovation course in the 2013 curriculum.

MGMT 3505

Business. Integrity, and Society

This course focuses on the interplay between business and society, and examines managerial decision making. The course challenges students to think about the role that business plays in society, and examines how organizations can help improve people's lives across the globe. The course also analyzes the root causes of corporate disasters and failures and looks at the role of human psychology therein. Students will be stimulated to think critically about their own ethical reasoning and will learn intervention strategies that may help to mitigate ethical risk factors in their own organization.

Students who have completed MGMT 505 have fulfilled the MGMT 3505 requirement and are not eligible to register for this class.

OMIS 3357

Operations Management

Examines analysis, design, and implementation of enterprise information systems as they relate to the accounting function and corporate financial management. Emphasizes learning not only what functions the systems provide, but also understanding their technological structure and linkages with business strategy. Moreover, enables students to recognize organizational situations for which information system controls and assurance would help achieve organizational goals, and to participate in planning, development, and implementing control devices in highly automated contexts.

Students who have completed OMIS 357 have fulfilled the OMIS 3357 requirement and are not eligible to register for this class.

New 4-unit Core Courses

FNCE 3452

Financial Management

Introduces the basic concepts and tools of finance. Reviews balance sheet and income statement categories. Emphasizes the time value of money, present value calculations, the opportunity cost of capital, valuation of simple securities, and evaluating investment opportunities in a capital budgeting system.

Students who have completed FNCE 451 and FNCE 455 in the old curriculum have satisfied the requirement of FNCE 3452 and 2 units of free elective credit. Students switching to the new curriculum, who have only completed FNCE 451 have the option of completing FNCE 455 by Spring 2014 or completing FNCE 3452.

MGMT 3519

Strategic Analysis

This course focuses on the processes by which managers position their businesses to develop and sustain an advantage relative to rivals in the face of uncertainty, rapid change, and competition. Strategy involves understanding the utility of different choices and tradeoffs – choosing what not to do is as important as choosing what to do. As a result, the course covers a variety a tools, frameworks, theories and concepts for analyzing a firm’s strategic position and the environment in which it is operating. By focusing on the factors that make some strategic positions strong and viable, students will develop the ability to evaluate the effects of changes in resources & capabilities, industry forces, macroenvironmental forces, and technology on industry structure and firm behavior and, in turn, on a firm’s opportunities for establishing and sustaining a superior position relative to rivals. The course also requires that students integrate and extend the knowledge and skills they have developed throughout their MBA program course work (i.e. marketing, finance, economics, organizational behavior, ethics, information systems, accounting, etc.) into a "total” business perspective. Analyzing real world situations best facilitates this activity; therefore, case analysis plays a large role in the course. Students will develop skills in developing a coherent, social responsible, viable and defensible strategic position that will carry a firm into the future.

MGMT 3519 is required by all students who opt to follow the 2013 curriculum. Students who are not switching must complete MGMT 619 by the end of Spring 2014. If this is not possible, please consult with the GBP Office regarding possible options for completing your MBA degree.

MKTG 3552

Marketing Strategies and Decisions

Focuses on decisions faced by managers concerning market segmentation, targeting, and positioning. Covers concepts such as new product development, pricing strategies, distribution channels, customer relationships, and performance metrics within a strategic planning framework. Students apply these key concepts and frameworks to cases and to formulating a comprehensive marketing plan centered on sustainable profitability and capabilities. Cases cover various environments and industries, especially those of concern to Silicon Valley firms.

Students who have completed MKTG 551 and MKTG 553 in the old curriculum have satisfied the requirement of MKTG 3552 nd 2 units of free elective credit. Students switching to the 2013 curriculum, who have only completed MKTG 551 have the option of completing MKTG 553 by the end of Spring 2014 or completing MKTG 3552.

New 1-unit Core Courses

IDIS 3700

Effective Business Communications

Intensive practice in forms of communication specifically for business settings, geared to the student's level of prior preparation. The focus will be primarily on oral communication and writing to support the oral communication. Emphasis on communicating complex issues and quantitative data to inform, advocate or persuade.

IDIS 3799

Managing Transitions (endcap experience)

The course is based on critical transitions, formative experiences, and personal conflict that characterize the common challenges MBAs are likely to face as they progress in their careers. One objective is to help students gain a more robust understanding of some of the pitfalls they may encounter as they make transitions within or across organizations. Research demonstrates that career failures are often associated with individual failures to successfully make these transitions. Blending theory and practice sessions will illustrate the lessons learned by others (such as SV executives) that have sometimes stumbled in making what seem to be straightforward transitions. Why are transitions challenging? Typically transitions require learning new skills and strategies for managing people who have different responsibilities, needs, goals and expectations than the individual has led in the past. For example, the role as individual team member vs. managing a team requires a shift in mindset from getting a job done through personal skills and effort to getting work done through others; shifting from a manager to a leader requires a shift in attention from focusing on doing things right to doing the right things. Such transitions often mean letting go of the very things that have made us successful in the past and deriving satisfaction from others’ accomplishments. Although easy to understand conceptually, this marks a fundamental shift in individuals’ identities.

Students in the 2013 curriculum must take this in their last quarter.

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